Food Waste

I just learned something and I’m so excited to share it with you, because I think it relates to our Bright Line Eating journeys in a couple of very significant ways. Watch this week’s Vlog to hear all about it.


Comments

  1. Sarah

    I struggle with this topic. From the time I was a child, I could not waste anything. I had to finish my food. (There are starving children in Africa you know) This way of thinking has led me to my weight problems. I can’t throw food away. It’s wastful. We spent hard earned money on that. Waste not want not. All of these have led me to eating my children’s leftovers, eating past my fullness cues. Saving evey little scrap is hoarding mentality. I hoard food in my body. I have to be able throw food away. Leftovers, my kids scraps. I have to be able to throw it away or I will eat it. I was and will be a garbage can.
    A wise person once told me “It is better to go to waste, than to your waist”

    This is part of the reason I am fat. Not being able to waste food. Just throw it away!

    Reply ·
    1. Em

      I hear you on all of what you said!! It’s so hard to throw it away….

      Reply ·
    2. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts, dear Sarah. Many of us can relate to your experiences. Sending love to you! 🧡

      Reply ·
  2. Em Crone

    Fridge management – that’s a great term!!

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  3. Rita Griebel

    I live on a farm. I normally make as much food I know I will eat each meal. Most people know how much food their family used in a meal. Unless you plan on using what’s left in the next day or so, don’t make more . I have a wild possum on our farm. I put leftovers we won’t eat in a bowl below our three season porch and he eats it. Even bones. Yesterday I made a roast, today will take the juice to the possum and when I check tomorrow, it will be gone. Had seen a wild cat late winter when I started putting extra food I did not want for it. Haven’t seen the cat for awhile, so know the possum is being feed. Once in awhile find meat in freezer that was there too long and again the possum get a extra treat.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      This is lovely, Rita. Fun to envision those little creatures benefiting from your leftovers. 🧡

      Reply ·
    2. Mereth

      I use many of my “scraps” in the compost to grow more veggies.

      Reply ·
  4. Joyce

    Good message in this vlog. In VT where I live we mandate composting food scraps. Makes me feel a lot better about not eating more than ‘prescribed’ and having food waste.

    Reply ·
  5. Barbara

    I agree that we need to be more mindful with our choices and buying and for me I try to really use all the produce that I buy. However I also do gardening in season and compost all the fruit and veggie scraps and left over produce. The significant amounts of waste seem to come from grocery stores and restaurants. I have heard of great programs in california and some on the east coast that purposefully recycle what theyhave – either by donating to food banks, soup kitchens and other composting ideas. Certainly more needs to be done. Good VLOG

    Reply ·
  6. Patricia

    Why don’t you compost?

    Reply ·
    1. Emily Horton

      …for more than 35 years now, our garden is quite lush.

      Reply ·
  7. Denise

    Please be aware of the Second Harvest, Local Harvest, local food banks, rescue missions and homeless shelters that make good use of the food that can no longer be sold at the stores, but is still fresh enough to use. My husband works at a rescue mission that gets truckloads of food from local grocery stores, so they use it to feed those they are housing, to give out prepared meals at suppertime for those who are living on the street but choose not to come in and stay at the mission, and they have a food bank which is open to anyone with a need. Emergency need is on a no-questions-asked basis, and those who are in our area and food challenged can come on a monthly/twice monthly basis to get good food. I’m really proud of how the agencies in our area work hard to ensure that as much food as possible is redistributed and not wasted. And, yes, they make banana bread, banana pudding and anything else with bananas that they can come up with, because it seems that there is always an abundance of bananas! 🙂

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      This is fantastic, Denise! Thank you for sharing your experience with these wonderful services. 🧡

      Reply ·
  8. Stefi

    Super important vlog!! Thank you fir this 😉 Many people also never learned to cook in childhood. Makes me sad . NO girl or boy should ever be beholding to anyone for a meal. Knowing how to make something ( even small /not fancy ) is power. So many turn to fast food .
    There are many moving parts to the food waste. Everything counts so lets all just keep at it

    Reply ·
  9. Emily

    Great vlog. I’m an intermittent ble-er, but steadily losing weight and enjoying every bite because of the planning structure. This little essay will definitely be on my mind for awhile, especially via “fridge management”.

    Reply ·
  10. AMY

    Good post. One thought. A person could always freeze those ‘little scraps” to use in soup stocks, smoothies, soups, etc. Thanks

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Great idea, Amy! Thank you for contributing to the conversation! 🧡🧡🧡

      Reply ·
  11. Amanda

    Thanks for delving into this topic, Susan. I would like to point out, that while a lot of food waste happens in our own houses, restaurants, and grocery stores, the issue is multi-faceted. There are definite problems with distribution of food, as well as the presence of food deserts in many North American cities. The fact that we expect our fruit and vegetables to look perfect means that a lot of food gets wasted right in the field just because it isn’t perfectly shaped or coloured. And then there’s the issue of forcing cultures who were previously self-sufficient with their food supply to start growing food for us because of some trade agreement, just so that we can have strawberries and tomatoes in January. My point being, I think our society needs to take a good hard look at ourselves and what we are perpetuating. It’s all well and good for the UN to have these goals, but unless people actually start taking responsibility for their food choices and start demanding better from our governments and corporations, nothing will change.

    Also, like people have already commented, composting food scraps is awesome! You can also use your veggie and meat bone scraps to make a homemade broth that can then be used in soups and stews. And over-ripe bananas can be turned into banana bread or thrown into smoothies.

    Reply ·
  12. Celine Horan

    Living in Switzerland we have large compost bins outside our complex to throw out the food safely. I have no idea what happens to it after that, but it sure makes me feel better knowing that I can put my leftovers in the compost. That said, I just read that we wasted 2.8 million tonnes in 2017 alone. Goodness knows what we have wasted since then. So glad I am a Blifer. All you said SPT resonated with me. I too find that when I manage my food properly much less food gets wasted. And that makes me feel good about what I am doing for myself and for the environment.

    Reply ·
  13. Sherri Healey

    Great vlog! I had to laugh though when you mentioned the leftover wrapping paper that you wouldn’t hesitate to throw out… not me! I use every scrap, usually to wrap the small stocking stuffers. It’s something I learned in my childhood that we do not waste ANYTHING and quite frankly I hate that about myself because it can be so annoying, especially when I’m trying to find something that is small enough to use the tiny piece of wrapping paper that I just had to save LOL and yes I reuse gift bags and boxes too!! It was really hard for me to throw out the extra food but your comment about not treating myself as a garbage can really helped. As a child we had to eat everything or we’d be punished so it took awhile to rewire my brain to be okay to just throw that 1/4 oz away. Still even after years of doing BLE I still hesitate at times with throwing that food out so thank you for the reminder, I really needed to hear it again.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Isn’t it just so amazing how our brains get wired that way, Sherri! And yes, the reminder to not treat ourselves as garbage cans is so powerful. At the same time, those little scraps–just the wrapping paper that can be saved for a small gift–can be saved to make up a meal later in the week! 🥰

      Reply ·
    2. Denise

      LOL! Yes! And even the tiny scraps of wrapping paper make confetti!

      Reply ·
  14. Erica

    Perfect timing with this subject following the Earth Day events last week. So glad that you have shaken my tree!

    Reply ·
  15. Lisa

    Composting is what we should be doing with those leftover scraps. Collect the scraps and put them in the refrigerator or freezer. If your city or town doesn’t have a composting program, check out your local community garden. They often take compostables.

    Reply ·
  16. Monica Dean

    Great Vlog! I remember after I started my journey my sister one time commented on all the vegetables and fruit in my refrigerator. I commented back that there may be a lot but everything will be eaten, nothing wasted. To this day that remains true. Glad to be doing my part to help.

    Reply ·
  17. Rita

    Family leftovers are the biggest threat to my Bright Line Eating program. When it is just the two of us, we rarely have leftovers. My daughter’s family of 5 eat with us twice a week. It is difficult to estimate the amount of food to cook for that many people so that is where the leftovers are generated. Most of the time my husband does not eat leftovers so the choice is to throw them away or eat them myself. I have been very aware of the tremendous food waste in America so it is very difficult for me to let leftovers sit in the refrigerator until they have to be thrown away.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      This is understandable, Rita. We’re curious if there’s a creative solution here. Could you possibly pack up the leftovers into to-go containers for your grandkids to take home with them, maybe? 🤔

      Reply ·
      1. Rita

        Thanks for your response. I have tried that many times but my daughter’s family does not eat leftovers either. My husband makes a great pizza so my grandson will always take those leftovers. When the family has pizza, I make red lentil, cauliflower or zucchini crust for myself. Not sure if that is 100% BLE compliant but no flour in the recipe.

        Reply ·
  18. Diane

    I don’t throw the snibbles of fresh produce out, I compost it which is collected in my area and used to make commercial compost for gardening. A win-win all around.

    Reply ·
  19. Nancy Porambo

    I LOVE YOUR SHORT HAIR!!!!!!!

    Reply ·
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