SOLIDARITY

There’s a lot of pain in the world right now. Society, hearts, and souls are inflamed, and for good reason. The topics on everyone’s minds right now affect us all, both individually and collectively. I have been thinking deeply about my role in promoting equity and inclusion as I’ve watched events unfold. There is much work to be done, on a personal level and also within the Bright Line Eating movement. Hear my thoughts in this week’s vlog.

ANTIRACISM RESOURCES


Comments

  1. Ellen

    Please email me the text of the piece from the outhouse and the name of the author.
    I would like to print it and post it where I live.

    Many thanks, Ellen

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi Ellen! Here you go: “Solidarity is not a matter of altruism. Solidarity comes from the inability to tolerate the affront to our own integrity of passive or active collaboration in the oppression of others, and from the deep recognition that, like it or not, our liberation is bound up with that of every other being on the planet, and that politically, spiritually, in our heart of hearts we know anything else is unaffordable.” –Aurora Levins Morales, Medicine Stories: History, Culture and the Politics of Integrity

      Reply ·
    2. Patricia Ann Trainor

      Thank you so much for this Susan. I joined the Bootcamp this week and in my first post in the FB house group I shared the pain I was experiencing in my heart because my daughter was calling me every morning feeling deep sadness regarding how Black people are suffering . Not one person acknowledged my sadness and I felt that I was in the wrong group for sure. I was seriously considering asking for my money back. Thank you for your committment to a just, inclusive and equitable world. #BlackLivesMatter

      Reply ·
      1. Bright Line Eating

        Oh, Patricia, dear. We’re sorry you had that experience. Don’t stop reaching out and asking for the support you need. We’re here for you.
        🧡

        Reply ·
  2. Christine Murphy

    Hi Susan:
    I love you as you probably saved my life but this was NOT your issue to weigh in on! I don’t come to your VLOGs to hear your thoughts on THIS issue!
    I wish I could say that I appreciated this but it was not appropriate.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi Christine. This is an issue close to Susan’s heart. She explains toward the end of the vlog that, as a business owner who serves and employs a diverse community, and as someone with a social media platform, she feels it would be irresponsible to not acknowledge the current social climate and inform our BLE community of what she and her staff are doing to educate themselves on issues of cultural and racial inclusion.

      Reply ·
      1. Lynn

        Thank you so much BLE for this explanation. It is very important for all businesses to inform their customers of their cultural and racial policies, and hope that businesses will do just that. Thank you again.

        Reply ·
    2. Julia Carol

      Hi Christine… with a great deal of love, I ask you to look in the mirror and get curious about your privilege. No shame, no blame… just look at your privilege in needing Susan to stay quiet about this issue. I believe this is ALL of our issue, and for those of us who are white, it’s a really hard one. We can do it together, baby steps, lovingly… come, I invite you in to the conversation.

      Reply ·
      1. Sara Anderson

        Thank you, Julia, for saying this for all of us. Beautifully done.

        Reply ·
      2. Brenda Flanagin

        Do well put Julia. Your right. We all do need to take a look in the mirror, hard though it may be. Thank you.

        Reply ·
    3. Stephani Horstman

      Christine Murphy I don’t know why you say this wasn’t appropriate when the majority of this video was SPT speaking to her experience and her plans for her business. Was this not her issue to weigh in on because she is a white woman? I felt she handled that sensitively and spoke of her actions and experiences. Was it not her issue because you are uncomfortable talking about/listening to the topic of systemic racism? I felt that she gave great resources to support education to overcome that discomfort. Overall, as a business owner and American, this issue is 100% hers to weigh in on. Sending you zen hugs and peace as I’m saying this all in love and hope it is received as such.

      Reply ·
    4. Carole

      I totally disagree. It would be nice to see emails from organizations that sent things out about COVID to send out emails about racism and inclusion. Perhaps Christine, you should look at your blind spots and biases,

      Reply ·
    5. Helen Roberts Spingola

      I hear you Christine and kinda feel as you do and expect we will get some flak on this. Our feelings have nil to
      do with our love and respect for Susan. She is beyond terrific!!

      Reply ·
  3. Don

    This vlog has me in tears from the start.

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Love. ❤️

      Reply ·
  4. Shirley Ammeter

    Thank you Susan, I’m so glad to be doing BLE. I feel much better health wise. I started May 9/20. I’ve lost 18 lbs. and 6”. I will be honest, I have a hard time eating all the salad and veggies. I really do try, but then I feel very full and feel sick. Also I’m 72, alone in my home. I would love to get a cook book, but can’t afford an expensive one. Also I don’t eat peppers. I would love to thank you for your weekly flog. You are an interesting and smart young lady, and I enjoy listening to what you have to say. Thanks again

    Shirley Ammeter

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Hi Shirley. You can reduce the dinner salad down to 4 ounces.
      I hope that helps. And have you checked to see if the BLE cookbook is available through your library system?
      Sending so much love. Be well, my dear.
      Susan

      Reply ·
  5. Tina

    I have lost 40 lbs on your eating plan. I am grateful for your plan. Truly
    I am awestruck by your reference to yourself “I am an upper middle class white woman etc….”
    Really Susan? Why is it important for you to let us know your monetary classification?

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Good question, Tina.
      Why is it important?
      Because socioeconomic status intersects with and impacts perspectives on race, equity, and inclusion in America. It’s one of my social identities, and the reality is that all of my social identities are woven into my experience. And that’s true for all of us. Being open and clear about the social identities we hold is one way to begin to frame and language a helpful and healthy conversation on these topics.

      Reply ·
  6. Pamela Haas

    Levins Morales’ brother Ricardo is a well known poster artist and organizer and lives in Minneapolis, MN. The son of her brother Ricardo is Minneapolis-based hip hop artist Manny Phesto.[8][9]

    Reply ·
  7. Diane O’Sullivan

    Beautiful vlog this week. I appreciate you sharing your heart and believe you will help many of us we we journey on this path. Great resources list. Thank you to those who compiled it. Proud to be part of this learning, striving community.❤️

    Reply ·
  8. Sharon

    Thank you for sharing. I had not heard the statistic of 1 out of 1000. What can I do? I am going to say
    “ hi” with everyone I see or come near to. Everyone is someone’s son or daughter. How can it be that we ever got to this level of disrespect for others! So much separation. It hurts to search for the words to express the pain I feel. And yet I have a feeling that just getting to recognize that so many are feeling this overwhelm, too means we are moving in a better direction. I watched The Help last evening. I had not seen it in years. It is still relevant.
    Love and Peace

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you, Sharon. Thank you for listening and for getting curious. ❤️

      Reply ·
  9. Gabriele

    thank you Susan,
    for speaking up AND for trying to make BLE more equal – it is interesting there is a difference in drop out rate and it is wonderful you care and take action. This world can, must and will be a better place with more equality, consideration and responsible mindful action.
    Fantastic idea to provide resources – so who ever accepts the invitation can at once become active and start the process by informing themselves to learn, gain insights and possibly change their mindset (it is a process).
    Who ever feels the need to criticize this great initiative of you and your team might have a farther way to go. I wish them the ability to let go of outdated prejudices and possibly long time ago imprinted misleading ideas so they too might learn to open their hearts and life a life feeling more positive about themselves.

    respect

    Reply ·
  10. Nancy Goss

    Thanks, Susan.

    Reply ·
  11. Vicky

    I appreciate what you’ve shared with us today. Thank you. BTW, today is my 14th day doing Bright Line Eating, and i’ve already lost 9 pounds! Thank you,Susan! I don’t find myself wandering into the kitchen, and rummaging around for something, anything to snack on. You had the golden ticket , and shared it with me. I will tell anyone who will listen. Thanks, again! Vicky Goddard

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Yay Vicky! You’re doing GREAT! And thank you for your appreciation, on both topics.
      So much love,
      Susan

      Reply ·
  12. Julia Carol

    Susan and team, I cannot thank you enough. Sometimes, not only is silence consent. Silence is emotional violence. May ALL beings be safe and protected. May ALL beings be healthy and strong. May ALL beings live with ease. May I use my open heart, curiosity and compassion, to overcome all shame and blame, and to dig deeper into myself to check my own privilege and to be a part of creating a truly equitable world for all living beings. That’s what you’re standing for. And I stand with YOU.

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Just basic human rights. Life. Liberty. The pursuit of happiness. For all. BLE can’t stand for love without standing for that.
      Love you, Julia.

      Reply ·
  13. Martina Brehmer

    Listening to this blog makes me sad. I have decided to cancel my Facebook account due to the fact that Mark Zuckerberg refuses to take action against Donald Trump’s comments which incite violence. Therefore, I, who have paid to be a part of Bright Lifers, can no longer access my account. I welcomed the opportunity to share my experiences as well, on Bright Lifers. This is a political and individual statement that I have made. Solidarity is bound up with every single person on the planet. There is no room in my heart for obnoxious comments, inciting violence, especially by the President of the United States!

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi Martina! We can totally understand where you’re coming from and commend you for taking a stand in this way. The good news is that we have an option for you to continue with the Bright Lifers support community! If you write in to our customer support team at https://support.brightlineeating.com, they will set you up with a Bright Lifers account in our new platform, Bright Liners’ Land, which is our own platform outside of Facebook. ❤️

      Reply ·
    2. Linda Wilkins

      I do not use Facebook for this same reason. Thank you for a BLE option,.

      Reply ·
  14. Toni

    Wow. Wow. Wow. Susan….you delivered in ALL WAYS. It was exactly as it needed to be! Yes yes yesssss. I just finished watching it – the second it landed in my inbox. I can’t imagine it being said any other way. Your authenticity reached through the screen and touched me. I have truly been expanded. Thank you for showing up and stepping into this space. I bow down to you ❤️🙏❤️ Love incarnate❤️🙏♥️

    Reply ·
    1. Toni

      And I am committed to a forever practice of continual inward discovery and growth…and illumination of my own blind spots. Thank you for creating a loving, safe and supportive space for this conversation and journey of evolving inquiry🙏

      Reply ·
      1. Susan Peirce Thompson

        LOVELOVELOVE your commitment to a forever practice. YESSSSS!!!!
        On the path with you, sister. Arm in arm.

        Reply ·
  15. Joel Ruiz

    Wow….great, great, Blog…..soy Mexicano y me siento mejor con tu mensaje de esperanza y ternura.

    Joel Ruiz

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Gracias, Joel. Aprecio mucho tu comentario y amo a tu dulce corazón.
      xoxo
      Susan

      Reply ·
  16. Allie B

    Thank you for making me think about what actions I need to take moving forward to educate myself on this issue. I admit to not recognizing that I have responsibilities to do more than just have an opinion. Now that I know better, I can and will do better.

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Oh Allie. I love you and I love your openness. You are such a dear. It’s that simple. We learn a little, grow a little, and then we can do better. I see you and I feel your sweet heart. The willingness you’re expressing here is precious.
      xoxo
      Susan

      Reply ·
  17. Lisa Rowe

    💖I appreciate your share today about racism. I stand in solidarity. Equity and inclusion are essential values to BLE and for humanity.

    Reply ·
  18. Ariann

    Thank you Susan. Great Vlog. This is needed to be everywhere to everyone. I totally agree.

    Reply ·
  19. Cindy Blair

    Thank you SO much Susan! <3 As I’m coming to understand, it is so very important to speak about this, no matter how perfectly or imperfectly (and so I am speaking up now, too). Thank you for speaking so honestly, and with such clarity, humility, and heart! I just finished Bright Line Grit and have loved learning about parts work (Internal Family Systems) and my own parts. For anyone who feels uncomfortable with this vlog, I invite them to do BFF (Breathe. Find your feet, or your seat. Find your center.) From that place, you can get curious about the part of you that feels uncomfortable. It (as ALL our parts do!) has good intentions. What is it afraid will happen if you (or others in your sphere) begin to think (or speak) about this topic? Personally, I have found both deep grief and anger, and that isn’t fun or easy to deal with. BUT, far more importantly, I have also found deep relief and joy in liberating a part of myself that was so deeply in shame, and now has been re-purposed to creating solidarity with my fellow beings on the planet. Thanks again – I love being a part of your community (and am glad to be starting Bright Line Mind)!

    Reply ·
  20. Tess Rigby

    Hi,
    I loved this piece and I’m inspired to do the work Susan mentions. However, I have just looked at the articles shared to start doing this and there is some worrying stuff in there. There is a directive to fund the bail for protesters. The things is, the people being bailed with these funds are criminals, not peaceful protestors. Black people are being used as pawns in a political protest between the left and right and the victims of the crimes of rioters are suffering so much. Bright line eaters should not be being directed to funding criminal activity by donating to their bail outs so they can go and continue doing this.
    I would ask you to please pass on the message Susan Pierce Thompson. I implore her to watch this YT video. Old though it is, it is made by a previous black lives matter leader and he sums up his understanding in a much better way than I ever could. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpZbVrIP1zc
    Thank you Susan and the bright line crew.
    Love Tess

    Reply ·
    1. Maggie Vining

      Tess, The assumption that all people who are arrested are criminals is not accurate. That’s the problem. I have donated to bail funds because Black people are disproportionately kept in pre-trial detention compared to white people. This extended detention due to lack of ability to pay bail effects their ability to maintain jobs, child care, and a myriad of other things that could significantly disrupt their lives, all before they have even been proven guilty. I think that is profoundly unfair and unjust.

      Reply ·
      1. Tess

        Hi Maggie,
        Thanks for this. In the conversations I’ve had since SPT bought up this issue and I got involved, I see I have a hell of a lot to learn. I have joined a great facebook group recommended by a fellow BLE : https://www.facebook.com/groups/BetheBridge and I am learning so much here. Thank you for taking the time to educate me Maggie. Tess

        Reply ·
  21. Tess Rigby

    Oh and I need to add, going out and protesting – as it suggests we do in one of the documents you have posted – this is really worrying. Please, please, please watch this before considering doing this
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpZbVrIP1zc
    The black lives matter movement has been compromised

    Reply ·
    1. Ann Louise

      Thank you!

      Reply ·
    2. Joseph Fleischman

      Tess. You need to stop getting your information from youtube about political matters. Youtube is not serious research.
      Joseph in Missoula

      Reply ·
      1. Tess

        Where would you suggest?

        Reply ·
  22. Maggie Vining

    I want to help. I feel so powerless. And I am so angry that Black people are still being hurt. It means so much to me that people like you with a voice and an audience use it to do something, so thank you. Thank you so much. I feel like this is exactly what we all need to be talking about. Everywhere. This is not politics. It’s human decency, and it shouldn’t be silent any more, by anyone anywhere with the heart to speak out.

    Maybe a Special Interest Group for Black people in Lifers would help. Or Scholarships specifically reaching out to People of Color. Or a BLE class for all of us by Lifers of Color about how we can help keep People of Color involved in the programs. If I had money I would give it to these efforts. If I had expertise I would give that. I feel like I have nothing to give but support, so you have it. Just one more voice to say “Thank you for caring enough to speak out.”

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you for your sentiments and ideas, Maggie. We just wanted to let you know that we do have a SIG called Bright Lifers of Color! 🧡

      Reply ·
  23. Pat

    Thank You! Beautiful .

    Reply ·
  24. Linda Ryan

    Thanks for this Vlog. It took guts, courage and deep thought…to put those words out there. It is every white person’s role to speak up and NOT remain silent. Some of us have bigger roles as you referenced…business owners can influence in different ways, etc. We can all educate ourselves. I hope this time is different. That some proven system of action is put in place. If so, we all benefit. It is my job as a white person to seek out and find various actions that I can take; acts of kindness; speak up when racial statement are made by family, relatives, friends, whoever. …we can all do something to help cure the madness.

    Reply ·
  25. Sam DuBois

    Yes, we each have to see what we can do, NOW! Thanks, Love, Sam

    Reply ·
  26. Jamie Keith

    At the beginning of this vlog, I just gave myself permission to cry, and I did cry. That you, Susan for addressing this important topic, not simply in speech, but actually expending your time and money to make changes that really help. And have to say, that boy who is singing, “I just want to live” is SO BEAUTIFUL.

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Love.

      Reply ·
  27. Mashael

    I so appreciate this vlog. Blacks have been and are being hunted. I am very moved by the ending of the vlog. The young black singer says: I just wanna live, God protect me. Something so basic.

    Reply ·
  28. Brandi Martinez

    I have even more respect for the compassionate work that you do knowing how inclusivity is high on your business and personal agenda. Just from a very practical perspective the obesity epidemic experienced in the U.S. impacts African-American people the most. I was just at the CDC website to look at stats on the matter and here is what I found, “Non-Hispanic blacks (49.6%) had the highest age-adjusted prevalence of obesity”. I’m sure you already know this statistic and I’m sure you probably know that institutionalized racism has been identified has a contributing factor in this dismal health statistic and the overall health disparities between black and white populations. I’m also a woman of color, a Latina, and a new member of the BLE movement. In perusing the materials on the BLE website I came across the demographic information of members and at that time I thought the BLE organization is so positioned to capture and help people of color because there are so few of us in the movement. Susan, you have a lot to offer people seeking relief from the unhealthy condition of being overweight and obese and it brings comfort to be part of a group that seeks to consciously pursue inclusivity.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you, Brandi. We appreciate your perspective and your insights. We’re so glad you’re here as a part of our BLE community! 🧡

      Reply ·
    2. Susan Peirce Thompson

      YES. You’re so right, Brandi. So right.
      Welcome to Bright Line Eating.
      I am so glad you’re here!!!!!
      The best is yet to come.
      xoxox
      Susan

      Reply ·
  29. Ann Louise

    I suggest that any Special Interest Group honor inclusivity. In the 70’s, I attended a New York State professional meeting for Home Economists where Shirley Chisholm, then representing NYC in Congress, told us she experienced far more prejudice/discrimination as a woman than as a person of color. Yes, we all have blind spots. GRIT was a good place to start doing our inner healing and housecleaning, which we all must muster the courage to do. Be curious! Susan, I especially appreciate this vlog, and the SISU -> GRIT process you went through! All lives matter. Long ago I stopped listening to MSM propaganda. Yesterday, my friend born in DR (Dominican Republic) and I were discussing this on a walking trail. We look into the eyes of the person we are with, being present with them, not caring what “garment/space suit” we chose for this life. I have no idea how her skin color compares to others in her family she is currently living with. She is more comfortable with me than some of her blood family. When I taught in Rochester, I would hear my students gossip about “light-skinned (name)”, “dark-skinned (name)”… I was extra careful not to verbally abuse anyone. My supervisor commended me for my gentleness. I would redirect from verbally abusing their “friend”. Students would protest saying the other knew they did not mean it, just playing… I would tell them if they did not mean it, don’t say it. We could take a look at our family dynamics. Is there abusive teasing/disrespectful commenting??? Look at our own inner critics. How can we improve our self care? As within, so without.

    Reply ·
  30. Marcia

    Thank you, Susan, for using your platform to go beyond BLE and take a stand for the marginalized folk in this world. It’s appropriate and timely and make a me respect the work you do even more.

    Reply ·
  31. madison frederick

    Way to go Susan. I think this is absolutely appropriate to be talked about, and I appreciate this vlog. I thank you for the list of resources Because I certainly don’t know what I don’t know. God bless you and your integrity.

    Reply ·
  32. Sonia

    Hey there Susan, Thank you for sharing your roller coaster ride. Very good reminder of where you have come from. You could have chosen freedom after escaping that life, but you chose “us”! Let’s remember why we are here in this community: that being in an over weight or obese body can be it’s own kind of prison, with its own burden of discrimination, and even death. We are so much stronger and more likely to speak up and take action for what we believe when we feel free of judgement and discrimination (whether it be race, or religion or nationality or appearance). I hope this community can be a welcoming and loving refuge for finding freedom and inner strength to do our best work.

    Reply ·
  33. Carole

    Thank you for this. Spot on.

    Also, I need to change my picture! I’m not heavy any more because of you and this movement.

    Reply ·
  34. Jb

    You are the CEO and you can talk about any darn thing you want and if you want to talk about your inclusion efforts that is your prerogative… This was just a painful Vlog to listen to I almost didn’t based on the title. I couldn’t even finish it. Everything is very in our face these days… I was hoping to just get a little break and listen to something besides the pandemic and racism… Oh well I will go back and listen to some of your old vlogs.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      We can appreciate that, JB. A lot of nerves are very raw right now. But Susan didn’t feel she could, in good conscience, stay silent. Perhaps someday you’ll be in a place where you’ll want to come back and listen. If so, the vlog will still be here! 🧡

      Reply ·
    2. Joseph Fleischman

      It’s been 401 years since the first slave ships hit our docks, and to this day, Blacks get hunted and killed by the cops. And your complaint is that you don’t want to hear it?! That’s BS Jb! Crawl back to your crib.
      Joseph in Missoula

      Reply ·
  35. Paola Daziani

    I appreciate all the work BLE is putting into this issue. I am trying to do my part as well. I think it’s kind of contagious and surely inspiring. Thank you.

    Reply ·
  36. Kathy

    Good that you stated that you´re white. If you´d defined yourself as a “woman of colour” I´d have believed that too. So often I hear people defining themselves as “people of colour” and, honestly, if they hadn´t said it I would have thought they were caucasian. Yes there are people with very fair white skins and very dark black skins but often I´m confused and recently it seems to have become increasingly important to make the distinction. I think it´s a bit sad. But I talk from a European perspective and it seems that colour – or more particularly race/racial ancestry is in the USA is horribly complex. I wish it would be OK to not be sure and not concerned about our neighbours´ colour.

    Reply ·
  37. Andrea Belair

    I very much appreciate this vlog and this stance. I was banned from another food related group “Clean Food Dirty Girl” for speaking up against white silence. I saw them censoring posts, “reporting” myself and women of color for expressing anything other than gratitude to them, even within the one area that they allowed for discussion of race. Although they were willing to make anti-Trump statements themselves, for some reason race was considered political, and any expression of outrage was deleted and reported. As a white woman, I am granted an enormous amount of privilege, and those with white privilege cannot be silent. Silence is part of the problem, and spaces such as this should not be silent. In a place where we are working on internal work, this is essential. Thank you for being willing to say this and express it–it is very important.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you for your perspective and for using your voice, Andrea. You are welcome here. 🧡

      Reply ·
  38. Deborah Buss

    Thank you, Susan. You have never been more inspirational.

    Reply ·
  39. Becca Pronchick

    Thank you Susan, for your clear, heartfelt and completely appropriate message for our community.

    Reply ·
  40. Vanessa Barnard

    Hello Susan, I have never commented on any of your vlogs or post. But as an African American women and BLE lifer I want to say thank you for starting this conversation in BLE. As you may know obesity among African American women is at an almost epidemic level. We are eating ourselves to death, for a plethora of reason. Which is why I am here. It is my hope to complete your program as much as possible to be able to teach it to my community.
    I am in two MM groups, that I love, but none of the other women look like me. I tell myself it does not matter. I have never felt anything but love and support from both groups. But still, yes something is missing. I wish there was a way that I could feel like I didn’t have to check my culture at the door to sit at the table of BLE. I wish your cookbook had more recipes that included healthy foods I’m more familar with. I wish the parts work could have spoken to the part of me that feels oppression on a regular basis and how to heal her. I wish the cost for your life saving knowledge was within reach to more of my sisters ( appreciate the scholarships tho). I wish there were more women who look like me because my sisters are dying…
    Be well, stay hopeful
    Vanessa

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you so much for sharing these powerful sentiments, Vanessa. These are some very apt and specific observations about our own community and its structures and conversations. We will pass these comments along to be sure that you are heard.

      Reply ·
      1. Vanessa Barnard

        Thank you, it is always nice to be heard.

        Reply ·
    2. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Yes, Vanessa, YES.
      I love you, and I’m listening.
      I’m going to reach out.
      xoxo
      Susan

      Reply ·
  41. Diane

    Beautiful blog! Thank you.

    Reply ·
  42. Renee Tucker

    Thank you ,thank you, thank you for this! It’s the first vlog I’ve actually watched since I joined BLE in January and I’m so glad I saw it and took the time to listen. I’m African American and this time, like all the other times, have been very difficult and your words let me know that you and your organization aren’t just moving on like “it doesn’t affect me” and I really appreciate it!! I love this community and now that leadership has taken a vocal stand against racism, I love it even more. Thank you!

    Reply ·
  43. Diane Angotta

    Hello Susan, Thank you for this beautiful, timely vlog. Your courage in starting this conversation today inspires me , gives me hope and. I embrace the opportunity to tap into the resources you are offering. Much love to you and your team.

    Reply ·
  44. KT

    I have been living on (national chain) salad place dinners while living in a Times Square hotel (which does not have a microwave or refrigerator in the room). I am living there in order to continue bringing my expertise as an intensivist (and trauma surgeon) to COVID-19 patients in the epicenter hospital in NYC without bringing the virus home to high-risk family members. They closed all these (national chain) salad restaurants when the NYC curfew started, a curfew that now makes it nearly impossible for my husband to drop off food for me because he is not an “essential worker” and I work into the curfew hours. This is a personal statement. The political statement is that a curfew in NYC is unacceptable. That is not the City I fell in love with decades ago. The why is inadequate. Outrage by EVERYONE over this latest display of police brutality is appropriate. It should never end.
    The same Black Man that is being barricaded from bringing his COVID ICU doctor wife food had family members killed by police in the 70s and 80s. Now, we joke that I (a White Woman) am protecting him and my Black kids from the police when I am in the car. But deep down, it isn’t really a joke. I hope that someday, I will no longer be afraid for my Black husband, and moreso, my Black son.

    Reply ·
    1. Ellen

      KY, thank you for the work you are doing and the sacrifices you and your family are making. 🧡

      Reply ·
    2. Bright Line Eating

      Oh, KT. What a tough situation on ALL fronts. We thank you for using your expertise in what you are doing. Sending much love to you and your family.🧡

      Reply ·
    3. Susan Peirce Thompson

      KT. Thank you for sharing your experience. I’m feeling speechless. Wanting you to know how much I appreciate you and value what you shared here. I am loving you, and hoping conditions improve, both for you right now in the micro NYC sense and for your husband, your family, and all people in the macro America/global sense. Standing with you. Listening. Hugest hugest hug.
      Susan

      Reply ·
  45. Karen Palmer

    Hello Susan, I am only 34 days in to bright line eating but you are showing me that when we put the food down, our sensitivity to the important matters in life goes up. I have been moved and saddened by the events of these past two weeks. I belong to a community that has pledged anti-racism for years and even displays a black lives matter banner. We intersect and associate with our local NAACP. But like you said, we can do better. We must do better. I am letting the emotions come up and not stuffing them down with food. When that young man sang at the end of your vlog so beautifully, the lyrics just made be well up with grief and longing for solutions. What I need to do is listen—just listen and be ready to serve in a way that those who have been hurt want me to serve. Thank you for this, Susan. My BLE journey is now richer and more meaningful.

    Reply ·
  46. Ronda Stocks

    Thank you thank you thank you. THIS is one reason I LOVE BLE so much. Compassion, self improvement, and inclusion.

    Reply ·
  47. Marion McGuire

    Thank you for your words and wisdom to help each of us learn more about our blind spots. It takes a lot of courage to want to be better as a human being and to invite all of us to join you.

    Reply ·
  48. Mary Gates

    I love you SPT!
    I quit participating in BLE because as a black woman in amerika I experienced a couple of slights in my FB house that made staying in not worth my woman power. I have remained flour and sugar free for 3-4 years now after losing an initial 49 lbs with 50 to go.
    I chose focusing on my community and especially my black children over getting ticked off by cluelessness. I have enough white people in my life to be in relationship with than to engage with slights I am not willing to not address…

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Mary, we hear you and we invite you to reach out to our support team (https://support.brightlineeating.com) to let them know of your Boot Camp experience so that we can work on improving the experience in the future. Thank you for reaching out and thank you for being here. Sending you love. 🧡

      Reply ·
    2. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Mary,
      I would love to hear you. I want to listen and learn.
      I am going to reach out.
      So much love. And so much respect.
      Thank you for sharing your experience here.
      Susan

      Reply ·
  49. Lynne Fretz

    You gladen my heart Susan. Hearing a CEO talk about transforming company values into personal and corporate action is inspiring. Silence is complicity. I’ve been burned by other weight loss programs and have been on the fence about BLE. I ask myself, “Is Susan and BLE for real”? With this vlog you’ve convinced me that BLE values are much deeper than empty words printed on a glossy piece of paper. So, I move a few more steps away from extreme skepticism and tip-toe into trust. Issues of life, death and trust are permeating our world and my life. It hurts like hell. Numbing out with sugar is my way to bury those feelings, sort of. My morbid obesity is a living death. Thanks for sharing the Bright Life and hope.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Susan is for real, Lynne. So very for real. 😃
      We are here for you when you are ready, dear. 🧡

      Reply ·
    2. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Loving you SO VERY MUCH, dear Lynne. So very much. I hope that one day soon you will “Come all the way in, and sit all the way down.” This program works if you work it.
      There are other vlogs where I’ve really shared my heart and stepped out on a limb. You might not agree with everything I said in them, but you’ll at least get a further sense of what you “get” with me. You just get…me.
      Here are a couple of links:
      https://brightlineeating.com/2016/09/the-jumping-off-point/
      https://brightlineeating.com/2018/04/faith-and-adult-development/

      Reply ·
  50. Tess

    Does anyone have any links UK related anti racism resources? Thanks in advance

    Reply ·
  51. Kathryn

    Thank you.

    Reply ·
  52. Wendy Welsh

    Hello Susan, I just stumbled on your program today and I have spent a few hours familiarizing myself with BLE. My investigations have culminated with this Vlog, which I think is quite on point, and I really appreciate it. The issue of Civil Rights for people of color has always been important to me. I am white and grew up during the 50s and 60s. I am upset to find us at this point in that journey, but hopeful. Especially when I see things like this blog. The last song was beautiful.

    I want to suggest something. There are a lot of food related issues in the black community. Diabetes, hypertension… science geek that you are, you can easily find data on this. I imagine your work with Trudy includes outreach. Perhaps with her help you could do some targeted outreach to the black community to offer the potent tool of BLE to address these issues for those who are so choosing. Perhaps you are already doing that. If so, pardon me.

    Just wanted to make this suggestion if you haven’t done this.

    You are doing great work.

    Best to you,

    Wendy

    Reply ·
    1. Susan Peirce Thompson

      Yes, Wendy. So yes. Thank you for highlighting this critical avenue of action. And welcome to Bright Line Eating!!!!!
      xoxo
      Susan

      Reply ·
  53. Tamara

    Thank you for your efforts this year and your message today Susan. I’m a white woman, but my family is biracial. So I know that this is still an issue and have learned so much by listening. I hope good will come out of all this and I appreciate hearing the support. People are people. We should all be included and invited and welcome. We should all feel safe. We are all Americans.

    Reply ·
  54. Sophie

    Hi There!
    Thank you so much for this vlog Susan, and for opening the discussion and awareness for many of us. ♥
    Thanks also for the link to the resources – can we share this link with our community? Or is it private?
    Many thanks and love to all!!
    Sophie

    Reply ·
  55. Moji

    You are an amazing person, Susan… a good soul! I have watched your vlogs for quite a while (& never commented) … I am especially moved by this one, I have to let you know. Please keep up the good work! 😉

    Reply ·
  56. Mabruka Yazidi

    Thank you for having the courage to speak about this on your platform. Nobody gets to choose when and where racism affects them; therefore, this needs to be brought up everywhere.

    Reply ·
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