Healing the Brain

A few weeks ago, someone posted a comment in the Bright Line Eating OFFICIAL Facebook group that really got me thinking about something I’ve never considered before. Watch the vlog to hear all about it.


Comments

  1. Melissa Kerby

    Another fascinating piece of the puzzle is that we are really in the infancy of understanding the complex interaction of humans and food, how food interacts with our micro- and myco- biomes, genetic SNPS, etc. This is an amazing time to be investigating brain/behavior/internal and external ecology. So much more to learn, but I’m thrilled to be on the journey with BLE as guide and with a skilled, experiences captain at the helm who is honest and open about reality of the struggle. We like to believe in once-and-done cures. It’s not comforting to accept every day, every moment we may confront challenge, but guidelines of BLE enable smoother sailing the more they are implemented. In the end, what is comforting and useful is truth. I thank Michelle for her question. That has nipped at the edges of my mind too.

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      So true, Melissa–there is no “one-and-done” quick fix! We’re so happy to have you here! 💕

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  2. Lee Ann Hunter

    I, personally, am so happy that no one is perfect at anything in our lives! Thank you for being honest about your humanity and the humanity of others.

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    1. Marilyn

      Thank you so much for your vlogs – I really look forward to them! Even though I’m not overweight or doing BrightLine, your information keeps me aware of my eating habits, keeps me onto healthy eating. Thank you!

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    2. Blythe

      Thank you for the topic today . The way you explained the pathways and the river beds made so much sense to me. Great topic. And I have to say, just because the old river beds will always be there, it doesn’t mean we can’t live our working on creating new ones. Even if for whatever reason we get off track in any way, it doesn’t take away from the amount of moments, days and years of feeling at peace with food. An off moment can just be an off moment as a result of things going on in life. It’s when we make it more than just an off moment that we can go down a rabbit hole. Rezoom makes great sense, as I don’t respond well to punitive measures to keep me on track. I would just end up binging more. I felt that way in my own experience if different 12 step programs and was not able to stick with it. And honestly, if the approach at BLE were more of a “you must be perfect” approach, I would have Never have joined because it’s not realistic for me to be 100% on target all the time for anything. And because I don’t have to punish myself for not being perfect, I am actually better able to follow bright lines well. Feeling good and having good results due to not having an overly intense, perfectionist approach. iIt is actually reassuring and inspiring to see how you, Susan, live a healthy, happy life without being perfect. You are so easy to relate to because of your honestly.

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    3. Arlene

      I love your honesty. I have been in a 12 Step program for over 42 years. It took me 12 years and becoming bulemic to finally surrender. I have been at a normal weight for 30 years. I practice continuous recovery as opposed to back to back recovery. If I make a mistake because my emotions and/or my senses have been aroused I build a bridge to the next meal or the next day. I need self-compassion not self hatred to restore myself to sanity and , as you say, “rezoom “

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  3. Nicola Connell

    Great information shared today, thank you. I value your honest and frank videos you do as I feel it shows you as a real human being with real issues like the rest of us that we can all identify with. No one is perfect and I gain comfort knowing if I am not perfect that’s its OK tomorrow is another day and I can rezoom and you show us to. You are very brave and you should be proud of your journey. Thank you for being you.

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  4. Richard Huffmon

    I have recently had a stretch of 10 consecutive Bright days, I’m on day 98; Even when my lines were at their worst, I still lost some weight because I could REZOOM after one meal, snack etc. off plan. Since starting the Boot Camp I have released 25+ pounds. My personal research has resulted in Whole Food Plant Based eating and the 10 consecutive Bright days. Am I healing? Based upon observable evidence the answer appears to be yes. Is my brain healing? Again, based upon “anecdotal evidence” the answer appears to be yes. The reality is that I weigh less than ever in my 25 year old daughter’s experience. Only family members who are still in touch with me can see the changes. I expect to reach goal body in 6 to 8 months. I’m 5;9″ tal and have a goal range of 151-155 pounds. I have lowered my goal range by some 15 pounds since starting BLE. I unabashedly admit that I love SPT, because she has shown me how to live Happy, Thin, and Free! I’m not thin yet, but Happy and Free are already part of who I am. I have changed my identity to a Bright Line Eater. Thank you Susan and David for the priceless gift you have given the world!
    PS How is James doing?

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      That’s wonderful! We’re so happy to have you here as part of our community, Richard. 🧡
      PS: We’re sure we’ll be checking in with James again before too long!

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  5. Marjolaine

    Letting reality be what it is… I honor your/our bravery and compassion, Susan
    Thank you 😘

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  6. Jody

    EXACTLY what I went through. And once again, Susan you put it in a scientific framework that I can accept. God love ya!!!

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  7. Heather Hudson

    Susan, we deal with food, cunning, baffling and powerful….. God bless you. I love you more each and every day. If you ever want to come to Welland, Ontario I’m here and my home is open to you “Mi casa es tu casa”
    Heather

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  8. Esther

    Loved that blog. You are the one who sacrifices her brught lines to experiment for us. Thank you. If people wanted a perfect 12 step leader they would find one. Hugs.

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  9. Ellen

    Another really good one. Thank you for being you, and for making what you know about our brains accessible to all of us. We appreciate you and your version of perfection – you are perfect just as you are.

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  10. Madonna

    Great information and explanation. Your honesty is always appreciated. Thanks so much. Madonna

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  11. Shelly

    Thank you for your strength and vulnerability. We can all only hope to be as humble and kind to our own body if we stray into the unwanted river. Knowing we can jump out again if we fall into the river means we can show resilience. For now, I am strong in my resolve to stay on course. God bless you.

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  12. Deborah Garrard

    “Ring the bells that still can ring. Forget your perfect offering. There’s a crack in everything. That’s how the Light gets in.” ~Leonard Cohen

    Grace is a gift, to ourselves and to each other. Keep up the joyful, real, authentic, and imperfect work. It is as Wendell Berry wrote, “Our Real Work.”

    Blessings all. Ring the bells!

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  13. Gloria

    Susan please make clear that u belonged to a 12 step program for coe that is a right wing/extreme version probably called OAHOW and is not main stream OA which has been successfully running in Sydney for 60 yrs.

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  14. Dana Rachuy

    Awesome vlog! I saw this question on the facebook page too! You nailed it SPT!

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  15. Theresa

    I’m not a BLE… but I have been following SPT since the beginning. I sometimes carry an extra 5 pounds but watch my eating. So why don’t I join BLE you may ask? Simple… I’m not willing to give up a few foods that are taboo… But never do I question the science of BLE….
    As always SPT was her compassionate self….

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  16. Sarah

    Perfection is over-rated. It takes coeur-age to stand vulnerable, not knowing all the answers for oneself or others, but merely to offer from the heart a possibility for others to embrace, or not. Like the Buddha, Susan, you have offered the path you have taken and suggested that others can try and see if it works for them. May all beings be happy!

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  17. Jackie Duczman

    Thanks for talking about this. I am 10 months into this new lifestyle and down 65 pounds, but am still feeling sorrow over the NMF I dearly miss. It never let’s up, but most days my lines are bright.

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  18. Lyn Wynters

    I LOVE that you are REAL!
    Thank you for relating to us in a way that keeps with scientific evidence, but is still personable and real!
    Many Blessings to you, your family, and all on the Bright Line journey,

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  19. Elissa

    I left the official Bright Line Eating program a couple of years ago . I’m a 9 on the susceptibility scale and did loose a bunch of weight, but not more than I had in other programs. The biggest issue I had was that the Bright Line eating program made me feel anything but “Free” in fact I had never felt more enslaved by a program than I did on Bright Line eating. It wasn’t the science or the food, it was the method. I realized I was trading one obsession for another, replacing obsession with food for an obsession with following a program. Listening to this Vlog reminded me of where Susan’s background in the 12 step program influenced this piece of the program. The 12 step program described seems more like torture than therapy, in effect mentally beating people into submission. When I did the Bright Line eating program I developed extreme food obsessions, in a way I had never experienced before, I would dream about binge eating (something I had never once in my life done before, even when on other programs) and I found my life devolved into nothing but thoughts of food and restriction. In the end I gave up the program and opted to focus on eating a predominantly veggie heavy diet, avoiding sugar and flour for the most part. I still binge from time to time, but I try to binge on “safe foods” things like fruits and veggies, I’ve been known to eat 5 lbs of fresh blueberries in a day from time to time. And for the most part the weight has stayed off, I can fluctuate about 10 lbs, usually going up a bit in the winter and coming back down in the summer. I consider myself stable and am currently smaller than I was in high school. The Bright Line motto “Happy, Thin and Free” ….I just couldn’t get there, I didn’t feel free, happy or thin. I really lost the program with the Facebook group, the “support” didn’t feel supportive, it was fake, don’t say anything that could offend anyone don’t talk about your problems because it might make someone else feel bad and fall off the wagon. I have enough of my own problems I didn’t have the energy to worry about how my problems might make someone else feel. And then theses, Thin, I guess that’s in the eye of the beholder. I’ve had people tell me I’m thin, but I don’t think I will ever see that in myself. My body issues go way beyond the weight and no eating plan will fix that. I think there are good elements in the program but I also think its just another over simplified approach to a very complex issue. But Susan is right about the paths worn into the rock, they never get filled in.

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    1. DK

      Ditto!

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      1. Fay Thompson

        I have read your comment with interest. I’m happy you have found something that works for you. I am in the BLE programme but I have also been in a 12-step programme (AA) for 42 years. I can say that the way we treat each other in AA is nothing like the treatment handed out to members of Susan’s food addicts group. We share our problems, we support each other and we just want to help anyone who falls off the wagon to get back on it again. But my main point is this: when I first joined AA, it was all I thought about. I had to lean heavily on other members. As the years passed, my life became full of other things, I began to wear AA like a loose garment rather than a tight one. The new riverbeds that Susan talks about are well established in my brain. It doesn’t matter what happens, I don’t even think of picking up a drink. Drink is no longer on m radar. I am not yet at that stage with food, but my experience in AA makes me confident that one day it will happen with food too and I shall be happy thin and free.

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    2. Catherine

      I think it’s a personality thing, I can technically score a 9 on the susceptibility scale if I think about my WORST eating times, but those have always been in direct correlation to the amount I thought about food directly prior to those times on some sort of restrictive eating plan. When I don’t think about food or myself obsessively, I am much much more free than I could ever be on BLE. I can leave cookies sitting on the counter until they go stale and throw them away weeks later. If I labeled myself an “addict”, told myself I can never have a cookie again, I would probably think about them non stop. A bigger problem is that my lifestyle would cause me to think about myself non stop as special. I believe there are such things as free will, self control, and sin. The most freedom I’ve ever felt with eating is when I made my first personal “bright line”, that if God made it, people have eaten it for centuries, including under obedience to God in the Bible, then neither myself or any food scientist was too special for it. This was the beginning of freedom for me. “It is not what goes into a man that defiles him, but rather what comes out of him …which proceeds from his heart”. For me this included self absorption, which swings back and forth from self indulgence to the motivation of human respect and control. As a Catholic I fast two seasons out of the year, Advent and Lent, and those were always the happiest times of the year for me, and also why I don’t believe you “can’t “ say no to food because I could do so easily out of obedience to God. While I’m not recommending it as a theology manual, the only person I’ve ever seen adequately address this issue as well as offer a solution is the Weigh Down Workshop book from the 90’s. When I said to God “I surrender, I give up control, heal my heart, heal my body”, he began working immediately. I had started my pregnancy overweight and didn’t gain until my weight stabilized at a healthy point where it should have been. I did not engage in any special eating to achieve that, God did it for me. Then he reminded me of some tapes my mom listened to in the car when I was a kid. I bought the original edition of the book on Amazon and have found the true answer to happy, thin, and free not just physically but spiritually.

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      1. Jenna C Reed Livingston

        Catherine—thank you for sharing. This is interesting…

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  20. Eudora

    Absolutely Brilliant analogy. So right on.❤

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  21. Laura Carlanell

    Perfection doesn’t exist in any human being and I appreciate you SO much Susan. Words are inadequate. “Appreciate” is inadequate. Thanks for considering things and for your authentic BLE journey.

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  22. Clare Conway

    For me healing (meaning to become sound or healthy again) is the perfect word and not to be confused with cure (meaning to eliminate condition). We can never cure our brains from being 10 on the suceptabilty scale , but we can create an environement of healing where we are freer from the symptoms of our underlying condition. BLE is a lifelong process of healing (which for me needs to be rezoomed at time), not a cure (and that’s okay with me).

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    1. Emily

      Brilliantly said and so true.

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  23. Ariann

    Thank you Susan. Most of us are not perfect. Thank goodness we recognize and acknowledge this is a journey not a prison or I couldn’t be here. After almost 2 years, I still dream of sexy foods but the new riverbed holds. Your story is so relatable that is what makes it compelling. These vlogs are very important..

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  24. Donna Morales

    Dear Susan,
    I am grateful that you have had “breaks”, because those may have and seemed to have propelled thought and experience to help us more fully. As an example, the RBRZ program being developed. Because I know you have been there, I believe in your authenticity and compassion to those who may be struggling. I have been in BLE for 9 months with only a few times of wobbly lines. My cravings are gone, but occasionally I still get thoughts, but they seem to be lessening and I just let them go by. This is amazing to me. I have lost 39 lbs with 30 more to go, but I rarely thing about weight now or food. I think about getting on with life, self care, habit stacking, etc. I am very grateful.

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      So wonderful, Donna! You are healing and working your way to Happy, Thin, and Free. ❤️

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  25. Megan

    Thank you SPT for always being so courageous, so brave, and so real! I am a clinical social worker, specializing in eating disorders. I have recommended your book to so many clients, and bright line eating has totally changed the way I view food, food addiction, recovery and how we go about encouraging healing.
    I feel that your willingness and openness and confidence to be exactly who you are, and to share that with the world is truly amazing, and we are so lucky to not only have you in this community, but to have you contributing to this world. It has been a long time waiting for a person like you to come and shake things up, get real and actually have a truly impactful and beautiful presence in this world! Thank you thank you thank you, sending you lots of love and gratitude!

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    1. Emily

      Megan, this makes me so happy to read. I suffered from binge eating disorder since early childhood, and if one of my therapists had exposed me to BLE early on, it would’ve saved so much agony and so many health problems.

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    2. Bright Line Eating

      Thank YOU for doing the important work that you do, Megan. ❤️

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  26. Michael Bowers

    Susan, I think the problem is your genuine, good-faith efforts to show your own struggles and weaknesses. Though you obviously have good intentions and are being humble, you end up losing some or a lot of your credibility as an expert in the type of eating and lifestyle you so vehemently advocate and promote. No one wants the expert/lecturer/teacher to show doubts in his own discourse. We want that person to be certain of what he or she is instructing us to do. You undermine your own message by being TOO honest and too humble. That is where you get people like Michelle displaying skepticism at your message. If people hear that even the founder and longtime follower of her program has enormous problems following said program, it makes them think, “Wow, then what chance do I have?”

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    1. Fiona

      I disagree with this. I think that it shows Susan is not afraid to say that she doesn’t have all the answers for every little thing all the time but she is willing to investigate, do the work and get the answers for people. I believe this enhances rather than detracts from her credibility. This is how plans and people grow, develop and evolve into higher and more complete versions of themselves. I don’t see it as expressing a lack of certainty in the program but rather she is troubleshooting along the way as things come up for people and for herself. When did Susan say she had “enormous” problems following the program? She didn’t ~ she expressed how dramatically her life changed, how stressful and busy it had become and now has 95%-98% adherence to bright lines after years of squeaky clean lines when her life was much different. She explained succinctly and specifically the brain healing possibilities of following BLE which answered Michelle’s question. Many of the cutting edge functional medicine professionals who study neurology will validate the brain research on how sugar and refined grain based carbohydrate damage the brain and how stopping them heals the brain. Doesn’t mean you will never have another craving but your brain can and will heal if you stop ingesting those addictive substances just like any addictive substance ~ and you will have a lot less cravings if you stop.

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      1. Sharon Silvestri

        Q a

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  27. Richard Pozzuto.

    Great VLOG. Glad I watched it. I am literally on my first day back on BLE after losing 92 pounds… keeping it off for 18 months and then “filling up the old river bed.” You are right. It was gradual. It started as a trickle, and then it become a stream, and then a flood. It started with me becoming very athletic and trying to supplement with artificially sweetened protein drinks, et al. I’m not glad I gained back 35 pounds, but I DID learn EXACTLY what you are talking about to be absolutely true. Thanks for the validation.

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    1. Richard Pozzuto

      Also, it’s way better to practice perfection, but never have a perfect practice.

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  28. Marcy Sanchez

    I’m not a commenter, but I really appreciated your vlog. Michelle’s question seemed to imply that addiction could be cured. I am not a neuroscientist, but my understanding is that once you are involved in an addictive relationship with food or drugs or sex or whatever, you will always have that risk or that addiction. BLE allows me to find the most peaceful productive way of living my life and still actually eating! It allows me to co-exist with my addiction without having my addiction drive my life. I’m not cured, but I am learning how to live with a chronic condition in a physically and emotionally healthy way. Thank you. Perfection isn’t my goal, particularly, because I don’t imagine perfection to be freeing. Thinking that every day has to be perfect would eat up so much of my brain space, which is precisely what most of us are trying to get away from. So thank you, again. BLE is it for me because it accepts I don’t have to be a cristal vaser to be happy, free, and thin.

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  29. Jill Kelly, PhD

    This is a wonderful discussion of this very important topic. As someone who is 30 years sober in AA, I want to add that not all 12-step programs are as rigid as the one Susan describes. And I have found nothing that works better for us food and sugar addicts than BLE.

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  30. Kathleen

    I think your honesty gives you credibility .Our food world and food addiction there is bound to be a slip up. Alcohol can be 100% once able to beat because it is not part of daily life., for example. Your honesty makes me think I can do it , instead thinking I made mistakes and no one does etc

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  31. Stefi

    Dear Susan, You are HUMAN & so are those hearing/watching you … I do not trust “perfect” anything. Rock on👍

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  32. Catherine Owens

    You are human. You are not perfect. It’s not about how we fall, it’s all about how we pick ourselves back up. You are a testament to that. Thank you!

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  33. Claire Harder

    Hello Susan,
    I have no idea why I did not learn ‘PORTION SIZING’ when I was growing up, but I don’t think that was ever on my radar…and then I found myself lightly scoffing at the statements that the food servings were just “So Much” but couldn’t ever say that for myself…..well I now say I am loving the portion sizes in BLE. I am working on being aware of what the ounces look like, what the serving sizes really look like, what it looks like to be in my lines with portion sizes. Thank you for this “new to me” picture of portion sizes! Peace and Freedom!

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  34. Janeen

    A quote from Hal Elrod author of ‘The Miracle Morning’ : “Give up being perfect, for being authentic. Give up the need to be perfect, for the opportunity to be authentic. Be who you are. Love who you are. Others will too.” Thank you, Susan & BLE for starting me on a journey of discovery.

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  35. Susan Clow

    That was a great question and a great answer.

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  36. Karen Hartley

    Well said, Susan! Personally, I am grateful that we can learn from your struggles. For many of us, this journey is not always easy and we seem to need to work to stay on track… even with the best of intentions. Knowing that even SPT is not a “crystal vaser” offers me encouragement to keep working at it and continue to rezoom when things go astray. It’s not an excuse or justification but just gives me permission to be human and feels more normal to know that others are working on it too.

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  37. Lori Ann Pierce

    I love that your journey has not been perfect. It shows that imperfection is still successful. My journey has been filled with ups and downs so far, but each time I stumble, I get back up and rezoom. Thanks for always keeping it real! Thank you for making sense of why I eat as I used to. BLE is a lifestyle, not a diet…..I can live this way.

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  38. Lynne

    If only I watched this earlier today, I would possibly have had a perfect BLE day. Tomorrow’s another day and I am definitely sure I’m going at it 100% . My river runth over. Thank you for the timely topic 🙂

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  39. Val Overell

    I so enjoyed this blog, to me it was the best so far that I have listened to, although I am relatively new, the river bed example was such an eye opener to me, and thank you that you bother with new questions and address them to us, Keep on doing what you are, obviously some people are going to disagree, but look at how many you help. God bless you heaps

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  40. Sandee Atkins

    I am so grateful for this vlog! My entire perspective on weight loss has shifted! Perfection of food lines has led me to dive deep into that dangerous zone. So many times. One bite off program and I might as well eat NMFs until I get that “new spark of inspiration”. It’s so interesting to me that as I attempt to have the brightest lines , I’ll admit, there have been times when it wasn’t perfectly bright. Yet, after seeing the rezoom webinars I don’t have to go all the way down. A lapse does not have to result in complete and utter defeat. Amazing!! I am feeling sooooo much better! The scale is not the measure of my abstinence. My inner peace is….
    Thank you Susan!

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Yes, Sandee! That’s the “Happy” and “Free” part. 🙂

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  41. Kathy Ocana

    I loved this blog, because noone is perfect. It actually made me cry. I followed 2 protein shakes and 1 meal right after surgery because I was scared to die. But now I am almost back to my original weight. I am so disappointed. I need help. I have been following the blogs but of course so skeptical of giving up flour .

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Oh Kathy, sweetie. Sending you healing light and energy. Please keep reaching out for support. We’re here for you. ❤️

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  42. Debra Marie

    Your imperfection Susan has saved my life. Thank you for sharing the real you with us all. And thank you for being willing to iterate as you go with BLE. You have my utmost respect.

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  43. Greg

    I’m a bit unusual among your followers, Susan, being about a minus 1 on your food susceptibility scale. But I totally identify with your general description of what it’s like to be a “foodaholic” because if we were to talk about alcohol instead of food, I would be about an 8 on that susceptibility scale. That’s why I quit drinking entirely 18 years ago. And I totally understand how much harder it must be for you than it is for me to decide exactly where to draw your bright lines, because after all you can’t just stop eating entirely the way that I did with drinking.

    Anyway, the point I would like to make relative to the topic of this vlog is that, just as surely as (I have learned over the course of my own recovery) there is no such thing as a typical alcoholic, I’m sure there is also no such thing as a typical over-eater. Our personalities are all over the map. But I bet there are strong correlations between personality type, like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and whether Bright Line Eating is going to work for them or not. For example, I have noticed that the AA 12 Steps often work great for the Extroverted/Judging types (like AA founder Bill Wilson), and can be totally useless to Introverted/Perceiving types like myself. But I’ve stayed squeaky clean sober for 18 years, and with no struggle at all for over 16 years, because I was able to figure out and work on the issues, in particular nutritional deficiency issues, that literally drove me to drink, instead of wasting my time addressing Bill Wilson’s psycho-social issues which I’ve never had.

    It would be fascinating, Susan, if you could get a few hundred of your followers from all over the susceptibility scale to take a free online Myers-Briggs test and see how that correlates with whether your BLE program works really well for them, just so-so, or really not at all. If you don’t know how to do the statistical analysis yourself, I’m sure with your academic background you know plenty of people who do.

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      That’s a really interesting thought, Greg. Thanks for bringing it to us.

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    2. Kim Cramblet

      I’d second this approach!

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    3. Rosie

      Hi Greg, you may find this video interesting. I agree with you that there is no such thing as typical–and recent scientific findings with regard to food tell us that there are different foods required for different bodies because of the variation in microbiomes (our gut microbes and bacteria). As there are no 2 microbiomes that are identical, even folks with the same M-B Type could have very different food requirements!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ryc5M3Ciytg

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  44. Birgit Peet-Bleys

    I’m missing the emotional challenges in your talk Susan. Emotional pain is most of the time what drives me into food!

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  45. Diane Boissett

    A big, no, a huge thank you! This vlog has resonated so deeply with me. I’m 3 years into my BLE journey, bootcamp in January 2017, got to goal in 10 months and maintained for a year. I’ve put on weight since having some major medical issues and then did the first reboot Rezoom program in January 2019 to try and get back on track. It wasn’t a success for me and I realised that the problem is me and my external locus on keeping my eating reigned in. As soon as I stopped donating blood, because I can’t with the meds I’m on, which required me getting on scales to be weighed by an RN I started eating off plan and gained weight, shocker! I then stopped completing the monthly research surveys because I was embarrassed that I’d put on weight. Letting that go meant that I wasn’t accountable to anyone and so weight gain here I came. I haven’t gone completely off the rails, but enough to go up a dress size which I’m not comfortable with. I am struggling with accepting me as I am now. I think that accepting that to keep my bright lines bright, making being accountable to myself more important that being accountable to others is imperative. I’m looking forward to having this sink in and getting my thin and free back as a consequence.

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  46. Gail Johnson

    I did FA and was fairly successful with the weight loss but really did not appreciate the “social shame” involved. I was kicked out of 3 attempts to do the 12 steps online because I lost my abstinence. When my brother died, I lost my abstinence, lost my ability to keep sponsoring and lost my sponsor at the same time because she lost her abstinence. I am not a fear based person who is easily controlled by extrinsic circumstances so I so appreciate your conscious choice to come from self-compassion, love , support etc and am totally excited about the Reboot Rezoom experience I am currently having!

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thank you for sharing your experiences, Gail. We’re so glad you’re loving Reboot Rezoom! ❤️

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  47. Rosie Mroczynski

    Wondering Susan if you will read this, I hope so

    Is there anywhere you talk about working with targeted aminos for engaging with cravings while doing BLE?
    Is there a mastermind available with that as part of it’s focus?

    The book The Craving Cure by Julia Ross was enlightening for me–as is the myriad of research done since that book was written..

    What if cravings can also be a message from the microbiome (which feeds the brain) about something the body requires it is not getting ?

    What if our food, even organic, veggie rich, BLE crystal vaser perfect, no longer provides the nutrients the body requires, because of the depletion of nutrients in the earth?
    What if the kind of craving a person has can also be a signal informing us about specific aminos our microbiome requires that are missing–which can be easily and cheaply provided?

    What if our moods (The Mood Cure by the same author) can also be a signal informing us about specific aminos our microbiome requires that it is not getting?

    What if working with targeted aminos could be of assistance in BLE, especially for people who have had a poor diet for an extended time and have a large amount of weight to lose?

    Food for thought–
    Much appreciate what you contribute to my life, thanks much for that!!!

    Reply ·
  48. Veronika

    What’s healing to me is also the restoration of the dopamine receptors, the fact that my brain can now read the leptin – the restoration of the intricate signalling system that is going on. It doesn’t mean I can’t mess it up again, but it means I don’t constantly fight my biology to keep my physical and mental freedom from overeating.

    Reply ·
    1. Emily

      Yes! I was surprised that the vlog didn’t address the literal biochemical healing of the brain, which is profound.

      Reply ·
  49. Andrea

    No one’s perfect! This is such great vlog. Thank you Susan for sharing that your bright lines are not perfect at times. This makes me appreciate you and respect you even more. This actually makes me more at ease with BLE.

    Reply ·
  50. Kate Scammell-Anderson

    Totally agree Susan, perfection is a myth and a sure fire way to self hatred, which is the fuel to addiction. We are all learning on our journeys together , massively helped by your honesty and sharing of experience, thinking and knowledge- which is how this life saving and life changing programme exists- and I thank the universe for that every day!

    Not sure I have this 100% correct but another aspect of brain healing is related to dopamine/leptin and insulin and the changes to the body/brain from abstinence from sugar and flour.

    Thanks for the weekly vlog and love to the BLE community x

    Reply ·
  51. Daphna Alon

    I must comment hear.
    I’m in my goal weight and keep my line bright as much as I can, however I know that the moment I’ll take a tea spoon of a cake , the next day I’ll take a whole slice and the following day I’ll be binging sugar and flour endlessly. That’s the chemistry. Only here in BLE I found the path to exit understand and exit those binges. Haleluya.

    Reply ·
    1. Daphna Alon

      Here…

      Reply ·
  52. Fay Thompson

    Thank you, Susan, for another great vlog. I should be horrified if you presented yourself week after week as being absolutely perfect. That would not work for me at all. I’d feel so inadequate. Your honesty and your approach of “we’re all in this together” presents the real picture, one that we can all engage with. So thank you again for your honesty. I believe totally in the new neural pathways, the river beds. I have been in AA for 42 years and my new river beds are worn deep. It doesn’t matter what happens, the thought of drink never enters my head …… butI know that the old ones are still there.

    Reply ·
  53. Deborah Bussewitz

    I love this. I love the reasoning and I love your explanation about imperfection. Thank you. Your compassion for self and others moves me.

    Reply ·
  54. Susan Belt

    Really great information and the analogy of the river beds in the brain and the identity shift that creates a dam that doesn’t allow water to flow in the addictive river beds. This was very helpful for me. I’ve been following the 4 lines for over a year and lost 65 pounds by end of September 2019. Maintenance has been a little tricky for me as I have made little exceptions here and there and haven’t been consistent about using all the tools. But I do feel like my identity has shifted and that this way of eating is a lifestyle change for me. It’s amazing to like vegetables and salad so much and not walk around feeling deprived!

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Yes, Susan. It is definitely an identity shift and a lifestyle change. ❤️

      Reply ·
  55. Karina

    Thank YOU Susan. I am feeling as though you (and perhaps Michelle, too) heard me through cyberspace, and just reached out and gave me a hug! I myself began just a few weeks ago to experiment with intermittent fasting and eating only two BLE meals per day in a fairly small time window. It’s actually going VERY well, as somewhat surprisingly I have lots of energy and even fewer thoughts about food, BUT at the same time I have also been feeling a bit guilty about not respecting the 3 BLE meals… Hearing you today fixed that, so THANK YOU! …and then the rest of your vlog gave me SO much to think about! Since I began BLE last year I have been struck by the enormous humanity and compassion, and the very high levels of honesty and true acceptance that are built in to the entire approach. The concept of re-zooming is in itself a way of a) accepting that we might not always be perfect and b) quickly resolving the issue so that the lack of perfection does not continue and then create any further damage. Your frank discussion on today’s vlog about perfection, and the lack thereof, and the compassion that we all need to bring not only to other members on the program but also to ourselves (often harder!) was so brave and so honest, and will certainly help countless others as much as did me today!

    Reply ·
  56. Harvetta Wright-Mims

    Way 2 go. Unless you have been there u don’t truly understand. Only by being there can you speak of how hard it is. It allows us to know it does work and you can do it for life. I’ve been thin and like now I’m fat. I’m reading the book and learning before I jump back in.. As both times when I lost weight I somewhat did a BL but the weight was followed by 3-4 hrs a day everyday in the gym killing myself to get and keep the weight off. My struggle is coming to realize that the weight would have come off anyways? ???

    Reply ·
  57. nicola algar

    Thank you for such a brilliant Vlog Susan I did bootcamp, and got to goal weight then started adding my own variations, of course it didnt end well gaining all my weight back on. But this vlog really helped me realise that that dry riverbed is always there and understand my brain a lot more. Maybe you said this before but the penny has really dropped and will help me immensely on my new journey ( Im in RBRZ now.) Also I love the acceptance of not always being a crystal vase, my rebel would not have accepted the 12 step programme approach.
    You are such a super star…..

    Reply ·
  58. Meri

    Susan thank you I really needed to hear this today. So many good reminders. Starting with the extrinsic motivation…and the river that can run dry by is always there.

    Reply ·
  59. Kristie

    Awesome response and information.

    Reply ·
  60. Karen Wilt

    It’s great to hear someone who’s in charge of something actually admit they’re human, lol. I love it. I have heard you say on many other vlogs that you have gone down the slippery slope more than once, but this was a “welcome to my world” vlog that makes me feel like I don’t have to be perfect all the time. I already knew that, but sometimes you need your leader to admit they aren’t too. One question tho: did you really answer that lady’s question? I thought she was asking about the actual ‘brain healing’ physiology like the dopamine receptors, not the mental brain pathways that you build as you start new patterns of thinking based on what you’re trying to train yourself to do. I was a little concerned because I was waiting for the neuroscience and you basically went to the side that we, as humans, have to train ourselves to do, which is the hard part for me. The science is what drew me to this program because it gave me hope that there really was a way to undo the damage I’ve done to myself over the years instead of just counting on me to be the strong one (which it actually goes hand in hand), but just the idea that there’s a physical healing that takes place in my brain to allow me to get “free” from my own physical self, was what worked for me. That’s sort of what I thought she was asking. I even went back and read all the stuff you wrote about it in your book to make sure it was there, lol.

    Reply ·
  61. Don Benedik

    Susan hit another home run! BLE establishes a new intrinsic value for yourself. I have been a BLE follower for the past 9 months. I am another person- happier, healthier, and almost completely free. From former eating patterns that brought about diabetes, overweight, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, I now am off most meds, reduced diabetic medication by 3/4 th( I have normal blood glucose levels and a normal A1 c count.) Normal cholesterol levels and weight loss around 50 lbs , I have been into maintenance for the past month. But, I could not do it without Dr. Thompson’s 2 books and her weekly vlogs. Thank you so much for BLE.

    Reply ·
  62. Nancy

    This vlog doesn’t respond to all the ways Susan has spoken of the Brain Healing with BLE: She has made the claim that a brain deprived of processed sugar will free up Leptin, and that element will help heal us. Please explain the relative power of chemical changes in promoting true healing, vs the power of a change in the habit of eating differently. Right now, I’m wondering if the Leptin information that has been shared was just an interesting tidbit, instead of a prediction to the powerful physical change we were going to experience.

    Reply ·
  63. Sandra AlMeaarek

    Beautiful, ‘not being perfect shows Compassion’, a very heartfelt message indeed 💕

    Reply ·
  64. Allison Bennett

    Thank you for explaining this aspect of healing/recovery. I am so grateful that you are honest about not having a perfect journey because I haven’t either and it helps to know from example that not being perfect does not prevent us from being successful in BLE provided we persist with pursuing that goal. This is a journey of a lifetime, not an event. I used to worry sometimes that people I share my story with might judge me or challenge me but that has not been my experience so far (I am six months in, about halfway to my goal of losing around 200lbs and, for the first time in my life, confident that I will succeed in reaching my goal of a right size body). I have found that being imperfect makes me relatable instead of intimidating. It allows me to encourage others to consider this (and sometimes even try it) with an open mind. I am extremely grateful to you for your gift of knowledge to us and your willingness to share your challenges as well as your triumphs.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Exactly, Allison. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and for showing up with all your perfect imperfections. 🧡

      Reply ·
  65. Tina Fisk

    Thank God you haven’t had a perfect journey because if you had, I would never be able to relate! Because of you and others that have had a less than a perfect road to recovery, I still have hope and keep coming back!

    Reply ·
  66. Michele Carreiro

    Well said, Susan. To ask if the brain heals assumes that the brain is damaged, or sick and can be healed, which isn’t really the case. It’s not just the brain “healing”, it’s the nature of the brain’s response to addicting substances. You explained the science well. AND that because those old additive neuro pathways are still there, albeit as “dry river beds”, if you start sliding off plan and eating sugar (a proven addicting substance), it becomes a catch 22. That is, the more you eat it, the more it fires up those old neuro pathways – and you get the cravings etc…. For some of us, that can happen fast. One or two cookies and a glass of wine one day, and before you know it you can’t stop yourself from eating all the cookie dough, and frosting and pasta and wine the next! Catching your slips early and rezooming AND keeping it positive rather than punitive, is the way to go. Thanks.

    Reply ·
  67. RENATA KRAUSZ

    Loved that ❤️

    Reply ·
  68. Linda Padgett

    Authenticity with imperfection is what this world needs in every area of life!!! You are heroic, Susan. Thank you!

    Reply ·
  69. Allison

    Love, love, love your vlogs!!! I think it is incredibly awesome and brave that you put your authentic and vulnerable self out here, there in your vlog! Kindness, compassion, and love for ourselves and for others is so important!!! Personally, I believe too many of us, myself included, have a thing for perfection and/or doing it right or not at all and/or beating ourselves up. I am guessing for addicts or those highly susceptible, that following an eating plan and sticking to it closely is essential for the freedom you speak of. I have heard and witnessed that alcoholics often cannot touch alcohol or they end up on the slippery slope downwards and may or may not recover.

    I don’t believe I am an addict although I am high on the food susceptibility scale. I took your quiz twice and one time I was a 9 and the other time an 8. I did do your bright line eating 14 day challenge the end of June 2019. I found it very interesting and educational. One of the things that I found most interesting was the “no exercise recommendation” as losing weight is hard on your body and a big undertaking on its own. I did lose 6 pounds in 14 days and stuck to the bright lines partially as I did eat more than 3 times a day. I ended up having a flare up of nerve and muscle and other symptoms that were a tad scary and disconcerting. It could have been a detox, clearing, herxheimer reaction or not.

    The main things I gave up were chocolate and microwave popcorn and switched from caffeinated coffee 1x/day to decaf coffee and added in dairy/yogurt. It was an experience. I have switched back and am doing what I had been before although a bit more aware of what I put in my body. For some reason my body is going through stuff and it seems that some sugar, chocolate, seems to help balance my brain for now.

    Some time a year ago or more, maybe January 2019, I was at an all time high of 183 for 5’7″. Tons of stress in all areas of life. I shifted up my eating a bit and was at 175 the end of June 2019. I did the 14 day Bright Line Eating challenge the end of June 2019, dropped 6 pounds, and was at 169. Through continued awareness of what I put into my body, I am now around 150 or so over the last week. I have dropped around 30 pounds over the last year or so. I believe the last time I weighed 150 or less was in 2012 when I weighed 145 and was quite fit and walking almost daily. I feel so much better at 150 than at 183. I am ok at 150 although I have an unofficial goal weight of 145. The lowest weight for me would be 140, which I was at back in 1996 when I was super active, hiking and doing other activities.

    My goal is to be super healthy and fit and maintain 150 or less! Happy, healthy, and free!

    Thank you for all that you are and all that you do for everyone!

    Reply ·
  70. Laurel Milligan

    I haven’t watched a vlog in a very long time. Because I’ve been studying the brain and rewiring neurons via DNRS, the vlog title caught my attention. Your river analogy was absolutely perfect! Nice to hear that concept in layman’s terms, and so eloquently described. Also, the end part about nonperfection is a tearjerker. You’re Heaven sent, no doubt about it. Thank you for all you do.

    Much love from Utah,

    Laurel

    Reply ·
  71. Rhonda Black

    Having dealt with decades of a debilitating and misery inducing food issue, I can personally attest to the brain healing that’s taken place. It has been nothing less than a miracle. Because as BLEr’s we face multiple assaults to our way of eating daily(as Susan said), we may fall and scrape a knee occasionally. But it is a scrape. It doesn’t negate the profound healing that has taken place. So we pick ourselves up, treat the wound and rezoom. It was a great question, Michelle, and a great vlog, Susan! Thank you!

    Reply ·
  72. Sabrina Perrin

    When I read your book, I really felt a sense of perfectionism. That was one of the things that turned me off of bright line eating. I do not believe in perfectionism. I believe it’s bondage.. After watching many of your weekly blogs and your reboot resume videos recently, I felt way more comfortable about bright line eating because, OK, here’s a person who has struggled deeply, she knows the struggle, she’s been on the perfect end and on the not so perfect end, and somewhere in between.
    I read your book specifically for the psychological science behind it.
    I find it interesting that I landed at an eight and a nine on the susceptibility scale. (Yes I took it twice) That actually made me angry LOL. As I am a nutritional therapist and I work with people daily who are struggling to eat the right foods and lose weight and keep it off.
    So the beginning of the year I decided to completely drop sugar as much as I possibly could. It’s like a switch has been flipped in my brain. Last Sunday for the first time in 25 years did I turn down brownies and cake at a church function. Now part of the reason I was successful is because I made a choice, the other reason is because I have several clients that I go to church with. And I have talked with them about my struggle with that particular event. We were able to all keep ourselves accountable to each other and I feel like it was a great win.
    All this to say thank you for being imperfect and sharing that with the world.

    Reply ·
  73. Jenny

    I love you SPT…thanks for always keeping it real, sharing your truth and being brave enough to gift us all with the lessons you’ve learned via an imperfect journey.

    Reply ·
  74. judy

    Susan,
    BEST vlog I have heard so far. Bravo! You are BRAVE.
    Compassion, self-cherishing, and compassion is what I received.

    Reply ·
  75. Jessica

    So happy to have a leader that is imperfect. I think life would be so boring otherwise 🙂

    Reply ·
  76. Ellie Osborn

    I think “this is my favorite vlog yet!” almost every week, but THIS is truly my favorite vlog so far!
    Thank you, Susan! The Riverbed visual worked well for me as a Geologist! 😉

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      There’s no need to play favorites, Ellie–you can love them all! 😉

      Reply ·
  77. Sheila Fimreite

    I personally feel that “Progress, not perfection” one day at a time is the most favorable way to recover from a food addiction. Thank you, Susan, for the Vlog.

    Reply ·
  78. Stacy

    Honestly Susan, I wouldn’t be following you if you had not struggled in similar ways as I have. We have a very similar past, and susceptibility, except that at 20 I was extremely restrictive with my food and was scared away from the strictness of 12 step because I didn’t think appealing to my overly rigid side would be healing at all. Now, many years later, I have been practicing BLE for 3 years and rezoom 2-3 times a week (seriously). If I didn’t hear about your honest struggles and you had never had troubles like that, I wouldn’t have given up long ago. Thank you so much for your guidance and honestly. You give people hope when the journey doesn’t come easily. ❤️

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Stacy, it’s so sweet of you to share this. We know the journey doesn’t come easily to many people, but that’s why it’s important to know that you can always reZOOM and keep going. One day at a time. 🧡

      Reply ·
  79. Michelle Seigal

    This was a great vlog. I am literally going to draw two River beds one with the damn and the other one flowing freely that image is so helpful to me right now. Thanks for sharing all that you do you are so inspirational in this vlog was one of the top 10 for me

    Reply ·
  80. genevieve Phillips

    Hi Susan, I enjoy your vlogs. I have maintained a 150 lb weight loss for 18 years , imperfectly, one day at a time, as member of a 12 step program for food. Gratefully I haven’t experienced the same approach to working my food plan, ( no flour or sugar, 3 meals a day) as you have experienced. I have gotten alot of love and support in spite of being my imperfect self.

    Reply ·
  81. Teresa Atkinson

    Hello! I have been doing the BLE for a week today. I have enjoyed the videos they have helped me understand my thinking and it was good to know that someone understands how I feel about food. The first few days were rough. I had to
    Laugh when you said the first day you started ble you went back to bed till an hour before your next meal because you didn’t think you could make it. YES that was me! You hit the nail on the head. It’s day seven and I feel SO SO much better. God made no one perfect and I admire you for your honesty. We have no twelves step program where I live. I went to a counselor a couple of times but she didn’t understand . Thank you for all you have done for us food addictive people. You are amazing. I saw you on the Today show and it has changed my life so far so good. Thank you.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      That’s wonderful, Teresa! We’re so glad you’ve found your way to Bright Line Eating and have a community of supporters here who do understand! Sending you love for your journey. 🧡

      Reply ·
  82. Suzanne Smith

    No one is perfect. Certainly not me. I have been doing BLE for a couple of years now. I was very successful in my weight loss goals, going from 176 or so to 134. I’m 67 years old and 5’8.5. Over the summer life happened, I started down the slippery slope, spent a month with my 95 year old Mom, and then the holidays. Ate off plan and gained 20-25 pounds. Now weigh 160 +/-. I rebooted/rezoomed the first of January and was mostly true to the bright lines and never dipping into the danger zone. My weight however has not budged. Initially it was so easy to loose the weight. Now it is such a struggle…. seems like it doesn’t matter what I do, no weight loss, or inches or NSV. So then I think, well, what’s the point? I’m fat again. So what? Also, I’m not one to reach out for support even though I read the posts daily on FB. Initially I did the 14 day challenge and then the boot camp. I believe in this program, I believe the science behind it. I’m very discouraged. My weight hoovers at high normal BMI but I’m uncomfortable. I liked myself in a 135-140 weight range. Any thoughts?

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi, Suzanne! You said you’re “mostly true to the bright lines.” The answer probably lies therein, with a need to shore up those lines. That might mean reaching out for support (thought we realize you’re hesitant to do so) or perhaps revisiting the book or your Boot Camp modules to remember what was working for you in the past–and why. Please keep reaching out for support from us! 🧡

      Reply ·
  83. Nancy W. Goss

    The microbiome is so different for each of us. As mine heals from removal of sugar and flour and diary, any cravings also leave. Thanks for your message, Susan.

    Reply ·
  84. patricia ricciatti

    so….. everybody’s different. well, bully but given such diversity, ble somehow remains universally applicable.

    you’re a great gal, susan and a excellent researcher, scientist, super mom, great teacher and advocate for all of us bl eaters 🙂 thanks for all you’ve done for us and continue to do for us.

    i unsuccessfully had been trying to nudge even an ounce from my too rotund little frame since 2012 and as i write, am within two pounds of my goal weight (which i have achieved despite plenty of “experiments” and cheats, etc. except that not one morsel of flour or sugar have i consumed since september 28, 2019) so i’d say there has had to have been a healing (call it a new riverbed or whatever you like 🙂 i’ll tell the world that ble WORKS! and that is all in all.

    thanks again (doesn’t seem like very much to say that because it means so very much more)!

    Reply ·
  85. Joelle Babcock

    Thank you Susan for this vlog. It really, really spoke to me. I have 133 days of BLE – not perfect but pretty Bright. I started on September 23, 2020 after a long relapse in my food addiciton. I started my obsession with food at 14 yrs old, became very athletic and hence, my weight remained good. Went to university to obtain a degree in biochemistry followed by becoming a dietitian. I had all the knowledge regarding food and health but could not get my food under control. Fast forward 20 years and I found OA (could not do FA as it was too punitive for me and I am defiant and rebellious). Got 3 years of abstinence but did not follow a “weight and measure” food plan so my saboteur won and I started gaining the weight. A friend sent me your link and I have not looked back since. Your vlog today really made sense to me re: healing the brain. Your program has saved my life and I am truly grateful. I can do this one meal at a time with progress, not perfection. Again, thank you so much for this vlog, science has always made sense to me.

    Reply ·
  86. Cynthia Newton

    Susan, Thank you, thank you, thank you!! 🙏❤️ This is a personal journey, to thine own self be true, physician heal thyself, let food be thy medicine, kind of journey. BLE is empowering each of us to be accountable to ourselves. First, the complete revolution ( for me) of learning just how devastating flour and sugar had been to my body over 50+ years . Then committing to myself to do better by honoring my precious body with real food, simple, nutritious, delicious food!
    Thank you for being inclusive and never exclusive and forbid giving us the tools to be successful. If we bend or even break our lines , we Rezoom and are right back on track. ❤️

    Reply ·
  87. Michelle Freedman

    One thing that struck me from the VLOG was taking the susceptibility test from when you were at your worst. I remember as an 21 year old with wicked PMS going to the gas station before it closed at 10pm to get a chocolate bar because the craving was so strong. I’m a 7 on the scale and thought to myself that I must be lower than that because I haven’t completely lost myself to such cravings for years. But I guess the river bed is still there, so thats something to be aware of.

    Reply ·
  88. Tom

    Re: Cravings

    Hi Susan.

    I was reading Keith Scott-Mumby’s book on food addiction before I learned about bright line eating. In his book he writes about one way to find out if you are addicted to a food is if you have cravings. In my case I would crave “original taste Coke”, Chocolate, and eggs. It also turns out that I am a binge eater for those items. Having cut out these three things and also chicken ( which was my primary source of protein) I no longer have cravings. I don’t have any interest in any of my normal snack foods either.

    Reply ·
  89. Jenna C Reed Livingston

    Thank you for your human-ness, Susan. You are what makes Bright Line Eating approachable, inspirational, possible and sustainable.

    Reply ·
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