BLE and Ultra-Processed Foods

In this week’s vlog, I talk about a big scientific advancement that happened recently and how it’s such an important step forward for the obesity epidemic. Funny enough, it’s something the Bright Line Eating community has been well aware of for years. Watch the vlog to hear all about it.

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Comments

  1. Susan Clow

    Great conversation and you are right processed foods are not good really. They are addictive and without proper balance and the downfall of this countries health.

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  2. Lisa Wold

    Hi Susan,
    I LOVE LOVE all of your weekly vlogs! I’ve watched you for years now.
    This is going to sound really crazy, but would you consider wearing shirts that are
    Higher on your neck or chest ? I have no right or calling to suggest this other than I think you would look even more beautiful than you already are.

    Reply ·
    1. Deb Evans

      Are you serious? She looks elegant and amazing. Perhaps you need to to really think about your own issues with women’s bodies.

      Reply ·
    2. Ian Breuser

      It is good that once again you point out the science behind the Bright Line Eating plan. Thanks Susan.
      I would like to point out that not all packaged foods have to be processed. For example, dehydrated fruits and raw nuts and seeds can be packaged. They would be considered minimally processed as long as they are free of salt, oil, sugar and flavorings.
      Of course these foods are calorie dense and not suitable for people trying to pull out of food addiction, but otherwise would be good for those on a Whole Foods diet. Just saying.

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    3. Lilian

      ????????? You Must be joking!

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    4. Amy Craig

      Actually, no. It doesn’t sound crazy. It sounds cruel and out of line. We have not come this far trying to love ourselves enough to treat our bodies with respect for you to make any kind of judgement at all on someone’s body or clothing choices. It’s unacceptable. You owe us all an apology.

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    5. Brooke

      Its funny but, there is another woman who has an online presence who has long, voluminous, flouncy hair and every time I watch her it is so distracting to me. She also sometimes wears revealing sexy outfits, too as she interviews famous people. I think she is smart and interesting and I have never seen anyone say something to her so I wonder if it just me. I am far from a prude but, would like to focus on just the content. I have noticed her getting a bit more “conservative” in her looks a she matures so, maybe it has been talked about?

      That being said, I do NOT think Susan is at all like that. She has beautiful, healthy skin and is not wearing anything “revealing” as to be distracting. She has a wholesomeness about her that she compliments with her outfits. She wears minimal makeup and her hair is out of her face. She would look great in any outfit! I think she gives a lot of thought in how she presents herself so the “message” can be heard.

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    6. L

      Lisa Wold is addressing her comment to Susan – NOT to anyone else. So why don’t you stop being the THOUGHT POLICE and lay off. You may not agree with Lisa’s comment, but she is being very polite about it and Susan take it or leave it. Mind your own business – Deb Evans, Lillan & Amy Craig.

      Reply ·
    7. Stephanie Smith

      Seriously. I think she looks fine. She looks fantastic to be a Mother of 3.

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    8. chris

      well, i think it’s enough to say “Yes, it sounds really crazy for you to expect to be able to dictate what someone wears.”

      enough said.

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    9. Cindi

      Yikes. This is about her sharing her extensive knowledge and research willingly and generously for the benefit of others, and you feel the need to comment on what she is wearing?

      Reply ·
  3. Meghan Trueman

    I’m loved this vlog!!! Been waiting for four years to see you do something like this!! Yay!!

    Reply ·
    1. Valerie Conner

      ❤️❤️❤️

      Reply ·
    2. Bright Line Eating

      You’ve been waiting a long time, Meghan! 😉 Thanks for your comment!

      Reply ·
  4. Tini

    So. You are basically saying what America has been gearing towards, because I realized that if I want to eat healthy I had to watch out for all the sneaky ways advertisements were…I had to make sure that the first 5 ingredients were not off the track…of healthy immediate ingredients…people don’t know this without amazing people like you giving this kind of information…thank you so mucj

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  5. juliet

    great stuff.

    Reply ·
  6. John Sirutis

    The Study intrigued me so I dug deeper. The trial was even more complex and invasive than indicated by Susan. There were periodic blood tests, MRI’s, and whole days in a respiratory chamber.
    For those interested the Journal article can be found at:
    https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(19)30248-7
    PDF’s of a shorter or a longer version can be downloaded. The longer version includes photos of all the meals and snacks.

    Reply ·
    1. Dee Fay

      Thank you, John. That was very informative. I looked at the extended version with the meals and pictures. The unprocessed menus look almost identical to our Bright Line Eating meals. Very cool to know we’re way ahead.

      Reply ·
  7. Sweetpea

    Such a great blog, Susan. I’m from the UK and often notice the difference in advertising and sales techniques between the UK and the US. In the US it is a very direct approach and its’s very obvious that a person has something to push and sell and convince you to buy a specific product or sign up to a certain method so it’s really refreshing to have you say I don’t have a packaged product to make money from selling to you – just go to the store and buy a carrot! Love it!

    Reply ·
  8. Jan Schaper

    Dear Susan for about 7 years now I am aware of food being of big influence to one’s health. Why ? After being diagnosed with osteo athritis at age 59 (now66) , i was being told that nothing would repair or heal my “worn” joints…So in conversations with co workers about my “worn” joints some would sugest starting using “glucosamine” as this supplement could give some relief after all. After a year of supplementing and searching the internet about joints and suggested helpfull supplements, I found a book and decided to order that book first, before ordering a new batch of supplements. The title was: Joints and food and was written by someone who called himself a “orthomolecular” physician. This book focused on the disbalance in omega 6 and 3 essential oils in modern diets. OK in order to shorten this mail, I started making fruit vegetable smoothies using frozen but “packaged”vegetables purely for practical reasons. I was advised that frozen foods still contained all their vitamines etc. Question: Susan what is your standpoint/opinion on frozen vegetables like kale, broccoli, mixed italian or asian etc. to be used/smoothed with whole fruits (apple, lemon, banana, blue berry, red beet, ginger root, garlic, and more)
    Yes I am very impressed with your presentations since I saw you in broken brain with dr. Hyman in april 2019.

    Reply ·
    1. Jennifer de Jung

      I’m curious too! According to one source (Archive.WPHNA.org: article in World Nutrition Volume 7, Number 1-3) about the first NOVA group…

      “Minimally processed foods are natural foods altered by processes such as removal of inedible or unwanted parts, drying, crushing, grinding, fractioning, filtering, roasting, boiling, pasteurisation, refrigeration, freezing, placing in containers, vacuum packaging, or non- alcoholic fermentation. None of these processes adds substances such as salt, sugar, oils or fats to the original food.”

      There’s much more

      Reply ·
    2. Stephanie smith

      Frozen fruits and vegetables are just as nutritious as fresh and possibly more. Frozen foods are picked and immediately frozen. Fresh often sits around for weeks causing it to loose nutrients. Just be sure it is nothing but fruits and vegetables.

      Reply ·
    3. Bright Line Eating

      Hi Jan!

      Regarding your question about smoothies, here’s what Susan has said about blending food: “Digestion starts in the mouth, where enzymes in saliva begin breaking down your food. Blended food goes into your system faster and it’s processed faster, so there’s less time for the release of nutrients. Blended food results in a bigger rush of glucose into the bloodstream (followed by a bigger release of insulin as a result), which will slow or reverse the healing of your brain and keep your cravings alive. Also, you may get hungry more quickly, as research shows that the faster a meal is eaten, the less satiety (fullness) results. Typically, blended foods are consumed 2-20 times faster than whole foods that require a lot of chewing. Also, there is research that shows that chewing your food promotes neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the growth and development of new neurons. It reduces depression, staves off dementia, and improves memory and other important cognitive functions. For these reasons, we advise that you focus on consuming whole, unprocessed food.”

      Reply ·
  9. Robert Roepke

    Another great presentation, Susan! I am now going to download the Nova list.

    Reply ·
  10. P.G.C.M Weyer-Liphuijsen

    Interesting! Hope you feel better love!

    Reply ·
  11. Elena

    You have all kinds of followers in BLE with each type of person more receptive to one type of message than an other. I personally love your science-based vlogs! The “mini-lectures” give me information and power to understand so much more about this very complex multi-faceted issue. The result is driving real change in my life and, most notably, changing my whole relationship with food. Keep the science coming! Thank you!

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Thanks for watching and commenting, Elena. Happy to hear you enjoyed this vlog. <3

      Reply ·
  12. Kim Ballance

    I love this vlog. I am remembering years of waiting in line to weigh in at Weight Watchers and seeing the shelves of low point junk food thinking, “how is this helpful?” Thank you for your commitment to not jump on the marketing bandwagon to box up BLE food and convince people it’s a healthy choice! Recently, I also saw an advertisement for Whole30 selling bags of food that you add water and instantly have a compliant meal. Yuck! I love my BLE food, it is SIMPLY beautiful!

    Reply ·
    1. Stephanie Smith

      And 84% of WW clients gain back their weight Not to mention the fact the stuff is expensive and loaded with chemicals.

      Reply ·
  13. Gina

    Thanks, Susan. This was interesting. I like what you have to share, but I don’t agree that the brain can never heal once it is “pickled.” I lead people through this process so I know it to be possible.

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    1. Joseph

      Gina, I think you misunderstand what Susan means when she says that the brain never recovers. She means that bad eating causes grooves in the brain that, like a river bed, can dry up (i.e. you’re addictive behavior goes away). But the river bed is still there, meaning that it’s easy to fall off the wagon, return to addictive behavior. It’s why an alcoholic doesn’t dare take the first drink, and why a smoker who quit runs from smoke. Same with food addiction, i.e. sugar & flour.
      Joseph in Missoula

      Reply ·
  14. Nancy Goss

    Exceedingly important message for all of us. The brain certainly needs to be protected. To think that we could permanently “pickle” our brain is a showstopper.

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  15. Linda

    Another great vlog. Appreciate your integrity for choosing not to market quick fixes and travel packages. It would be a huge income source for you. Instead you show how we can travel by planning ahead. Sad that we value ourselves and our health so little that we want instant meals. Raw veggies and fruit are as quick as tearing open a package. Your BLE plan is the best.I’m a perfect 10. Unfortunately, I need to regroup but know I will get there.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Raw fruits and veggies, some nuts and hummus…done. How’s that for speedy? 😉

      Reply ·
  16. Janice Bittner

    I found this link which has some good information (at least I think it does).

    http://www.fao.org/3/ca5644en/ca5644en.pdf

    I was hoping for a searchable list so that I could make better decisions when I need to buy something that has been processed (unfortunately, sounds like we can’t get away from that), but this only gave examples, not a list.

    Reply ·
  17. Michelle Lomas

    Thanks for this. I didn’t really consider the different levels of processing of foods too much as I very rarely purchase anything in a can/jar/bottle/box or bag. But to have the brain possibly start to react to minimally processed foods is indeed a real concern; I do know I won’t drink fruit juices or eat dried fruit only because of my potential for consuming the entire contents in very short order because I consider them ‘treats’… hmmm….

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  18. Mercedes (from Argentina)

    My pickled brain says: “you’re so right!”. Love you, Susan.

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  19. chris

    awesome. i agree that more studies need to be designed on addiction… to all things.

    Reply ·
  20. Gary L Gibson

    SUSAN: If hummus is a processed food, should I instead only fix beans from scratch. I love hummus on carrots.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi Gary!

      Hummus is a little bit of a weird exception. We’ve noticed it’s just not triggering for most people. Michael Greger, M.D. (from http://nutritionfacts.org) did a video where he talked about a study showing the glucose response and insulin spike from blended legumes is not the same as it is for other blended foods. Garbanzo beans behave differently than other blended foods, turning out to be the exception. Beans are soluble fiber, which means the benefit from the fiber is maintained when they are ground. Hope that helps you in your decision!

      Reply ·
  21. Cynthia Meigs

    I found this weeek’s vlog very interesting. It seems to me that there are times when a smoothie would be appropriate if someone has digestive issues that are causing diarrhea. BLE is very restrictive for those of us with these health issues. It seems to me that there is not much flexibility in the program to deal with such issues. In addition, when told to” stick to the effing plan”, I interpret that as meaning 6 oz of berries, not 5 oz or 6.1 oz and so on. CONFESSION! I add .1 oz to the berries just because I am obstinate about the inflexibility. I lost 35 # at first on this program and have been stuck ever since so when I hear people lauding BLE as the “be all and end all program for people to lose weight and keep it off”, I am very skeptical even after losing weight on it. I have reached a plateau and frankly I don’t see any answers to that issue. I would love to hear some if anyone is so inclined. Health issues are not appropriately addressed by professionals in this program. It was my understanding that there was a nutritionist on the BLE staff and then I was told there is not.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi Cynthia! Thanks for watching and for commenting! If you have a copy of the book “Bright Line Eating” there is a section on plateaus and exactly what to do in those circumstances. Or if you were in Boot Camp you can revisit that section in your course materials. Also, you are correct, we are not medical doctors and so some individuals need to seek professional advice on their meal plan to work with their specific health circumstances. There are many who modify the meal plan to fit their needs. <3

      Reply ·
  22. Inkling

    The weekly Vlogs are always a source of information and are useful! Thanks very much Susan!

    Reply ·
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