“Invited” vs. “Included”

The 4th Annual Bright Line Eating Family Reunion just wrapped up, and without a doubt, I had one main takeaway from the event. It was humbling, sobering, and life-altering.

Comments

  1. Jacque Brown

    Susan, you show us again that you are an amazing woman. You never shy away from hard things. You never make excuses. I’m confident that your lunch with Sylvia showed her that you really do love her. You really do include her, and you will do what it takes to ensure that she and everyone, no matter what demographic, will be truly included in Bright Line Eating. ❤️

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    1. LAURIE OLSON

      Well said and I agree.

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  2. Susan

    You did it again by saying that Sylvia didn’t quite fit in as a black woman of color in a urban or gangster culture suggesting that black people only fit into those two cultures.

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    1. Rosana

      Yeah, that was kind of shocking to hear her say that. She does say she is getting support, so let’s hope she will make progress.

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    2. Gretchen

      Thank you for pointing this out. My hair prickled when I heard her say the word “gangsta”, but I didn’t know why. And that shows my unconsciousness. It’s a long journey.

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    3. Susan Peirce Thompson, PhD

      Susan,
      Those were Sylvia’s words to me. I suspect she’s aware of the breadth and nuance of the many, many cultures that embody black America and black cultures in other countries…but her experience that she related to me, perhaps because of the particular black cultures where she lived for various stretches of time, or perhaps just as two examples that may have stood in for other experiences of not fully belonging, included those two descriptors, and that’s what I relayed.
      I appreciate what I’m guessing is your more global (though unsaid) point, though, that those are potentially harmful stereotypes.
      With love and care,
      Susan

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      1. Gretchen

        SPT, you’ve come to the understanding that while black people may use the N word amongst themselves, it is never one that should come from a white mouth. My thought is that it is the same with “gangsta”. Just because she used it in conversation with you, I’m not sure it gives you permission to use it as well.

        Thank you for your willingness to step up and admit unconscious racism. At least, that’s what I think you’re talking about in your video. I’m nonBIPOC, I’ve committed my fair share of gaffes over the years. It can be a painful process. I strive to learn and be better. As I’m also human, I sometimes don’t get it right. Still, we must learn and change.

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      2. Audra

        Thank you Susan your courageous and amazing, I left a response in Katerina Seligman’s post which expressed my thankfulness for both yourself and her. I watched the whole of your video post and knew straight away that you were using Sylvia’s words as it is sometimes challenging to define ‘where one fits in’, particularly when society often by one look or where you come from will self determine ‘who or what’ you are. Sometimes it is as simple as being the only brown face in the room and being confident enough to stop the thoughts of “Will I be judged?, Will I be accepted?, Will they understand that how I grew up those foods are so foreign to me?, What if I hear a racist comment?, What about the criticism I have to handle because I am choosing to eat differently to my cultural peers and now they judge me?. I also did not complete the Brightline Eating course module I paid for ages ago. But guess what Now I’m motivated to give it another go. Thank you! from a Maori/Scottish/English gal from South Auckland, New Zealand

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      3. Debra McLean

        Susan… you are a great example of selfless, devoted, unconditional loving and giving. Your actions speak this in volumes. Your intentions are heart full, pure , positive and purposeful.
        Words are words. Actions speak louder.
        Inclusiveness is very complex. I, too, am a very loving person who does not see colour. I, too, have used words with Canadian Indigenous and have made mistakes with words, however, my actions of being open to loving, accepting, learning, trying and manifesting inclusiveness speak way louder. Very powerful indeed.
        Stay true to your own truth. As you know, healing is up to us as individuals. We steer the ship. Sometimes we come across unexpected turbulent waters that challenge our navigation. We diligently work through these times to get back on our own true path. We lovingly own and embrace the turbulence, and learn and grow, but we do not own the ocean waters. I completely trust in you to continue on your journey with grace and purpose. Thank you for guiding and helping others to navigate their own ships in our vast and complex ocean.

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        1. Rita Palmer

          I just came to your website and I listened to the vlog. WOW. We do unintentionally commit those gaffes and other subconscious pain causing things. But I listened to your heart. You were pure and vulnerable and loving. I appreciate that you wanted to learn and understand more. I cried so much while listening to you. I wish others will take a lesson from you. I take a lesson from you even as a brown woman from the Caribbean. I take you as a sister. I love you sister.

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    4. Cassandra K

      Yes, SPT did say those words, but it was preceded at about 8:23 by, “Sylvia shared…” What followed was SPT paraphrasing what Sylvia shared, including not being a fit in various situations. Therefore, in the context, it was Sylvia saying she didn’t fit in, not SPT declaring this about Sylvia. Good work, SPT.

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    5. Hayley

      Yes, she did. I love SPT but this is not ok in my mind even if she was quoting Sylvia which she possibly was. It doesn’t sit right either way.

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    6. Gwen

      I’ve lost 90lbs through BLE and I’m hugely grateful. But it’s things like this that reconfirm that BLE is not my tribe. Very very disappointing and frankly shocking.

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      1. Karen Holbert

        We’ll said.

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    7. Nancy Masterson-Newkirk

      That was inappropriate and insensitive, agreed.

      Also, I love BLE, but it’s not surprising that it’s mainly middle class middle aged and older white women. It’s expensive for the boot camps and bright lifers, not to mention all the classes. I love the Facebook community, but the cost is pre-selecting for a certain demographic group. My friend just did the 10 day challenge and read the book. I wish there was no charge or a smaller charge for Bright Lifers–like in WW when you go for free when you’ve reached your goal. I would have loved to attend the reunion, but it’s too pricey. I wish that the video stream was cheaper too–that would be a great way to be inclusive. There’s a lot that could be done to make BLE more accessible and affordable to a larger number of people.

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      1. Maggie

        I agree that inclusiveness should include people who could not in a million years afford the “family” gathering. Like me.

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      2. Shanda Sherpa

        Nancy Masterson-Newkirk I hope you got the email from BLE about the longevity pricing. It goes down the longer you are in Bright Lifers. I’m dirt poor, so this will help me a great deal. Yes, the reunion is pricey, so I may not be able to return for a third time, but I also know that things can be attained if they’re important enough, so we’ll see what happens. I hope you aren’t turned off to BLE forever, but best wishes on your journey, however it unfolds.

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    8. Sarah K. Laird

      Very much agreed. The intent to improve is obviously here, but hopefully she will get help or training before commenting on this further.

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    9. Trinity

      Hello Susan,

      Sylvia, thank you so much for taking the risk to speak up when you were hurt..it takes a lot of courage to do that. One person can make a difference and you were that person at this reunion, for this situation.

      Susan, thank you too for taking the risk to speak your truth. I feel sad and disappointed that you repeated that and that Sylvia (and so many) were hurt by this. But, on the other hand, I also feel relieved and grateful that you listened to Sylvia, let her words land and was deeply affected by her. Of equal import, you didn’t shy away from this and were willing to speak up and make some changes for yourself and BLE as a whole. Thank you for starting to make amends in every possible way. As an old timer, I learned a long time ago that you say sorry until the pain in their eyes goes away…and then go a little further, (insert heart). I am a First Nations/British, uncategorically sexual woman from Canada (divorced from a First Nations/Canadian man,) and now married to a white British/Canadian woman with a 9 year old daughter who is Native/African American/British.

      Coming from my world I am SO grateful to you and your team for bringing BLE into the world. I Googled menopause, women, weight loss…nothing more or less. And there you were at midnight talking about the science behind losing weight…I saw a lot of older women (I’m 58) and thought, ”hmmm, maybe this will work.” 😉 and it has since Nov 1st 2018…living happy thin and free from the west coast of Canada.

      I pray this will help heal all and that BLE will become home to many more people who need to be happy, thin and free.

      Much love,

      Trinity B

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    10. Roy Montgomery

      I’m a black male doing BLE. I live in a rural part of Ontario and my career has mostly been in law enforcement. So I’m not white, female, urban or a gangster.

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    11. mary

      She said urban, or gangster, or any other……please, she is so sincere in her desire to learn how to not offend anyone. I think anyone who watched this video could clearly see what Susan’s heart is all about. Using the “race card” has become so abused……clearly Susan is not a racist.

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  3. Priscilla

    So powerful, Susan and Sylvia. I am with you on this vital and required journey.

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  4. Katerina Seligman

    Well done Susan to recognize your ignorance and unconscious racism ! I am a white European, and live in New Zealand. I have been on a journey for 20 years now, learning about my own unconscious racism to wards Maori. I have been learning the Maori language all of that time and now have several Maori friends, but I know I still carry unconscious and partially conscious biases and beliefs. I come from a holocaust survivor family and when I started this journey I thought that I was not in any way racist.. I discovered that most racism is unconscious. We do not know what we do not know. To create an organization which is truly inclusive is a BIG work. A HUGE work. Congratulations for recognizing the need to do that work. I love what you do!

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    1. Audra

      Thank you Katerina, As a Maori/Scots/English (yet people only see the Maori in me because of the colour of my skin) I have been treated unjustly at times. So it gives me hope to see people like yourself who make an effort to understand unconscious bias. As I too even have to work on my own unconscious bias. I am so grateful Susan posted this as One of the reasons I did not follow through with Brightline eating was because I felt I would never fit in.

      I am learning to overcome my fear of white privilege. One of the ways I have improved my confidence is that one of my friends from the UK invited me to a conference one day and I said to her “Have you noticed I’m the only brown face here”. She laughed and said “Don’t be Stupid”, she then took a look around and said “Oh my gosh your right I hadn’t noticed” but once I pointed it out she said she started to notice it in many of the clubs and places she went and thought of me, and started to question why ‘people like me’ were never there.

      I said it’s as simple as this, “We’re not invited”. So guess what she started inviting me to everything to improve my confidence. I can now be the only brown face in a room and not be so scared anymore. I’m also confident enough to ask why more people like me are not sitting in some of the meetings I attend. I also invite my non-maori friends to the Marae and take them to places they would normally not go either. I’m so grateful for people like yourself and Susan. It so gives me HOPE for us ALL!

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      1. Marta

        <3

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  5. Marcia Corenman

    I am so proud to say I sm a part of Bright Line Eating thanks to you SPT. I look forward to learning along with you and our fellow travelers how to become truly inclusive and compassionate toward each person’s unique life experience. Thank you for the incredible opportunity you provide for continusl personal growth.

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  6. Michele

    BULLSHIT Susan. You fucked up. Don’t forget your sorted past. You know better. Don’t forget you are an ETHNIC women. Bullshit video. Not good enough. Get support. Give me a break. This should of never happened. It’s obvious from your videos that you are self centered. and conceited but cruel I never imagined. This is on you.

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    1. Marta

      Wow, Michelle! You obviously have some triggers that you need to work on. SusanPT is saying she will be working on this and you shower her condemnation? Not cool.

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    2. Audra

      Wow that’s harsh Michele, do you know how much courage it takes to publicly admit when you believe you have done wrong. There are many many non inclusive groups out there selling healthy eating. To date I have NOT seen a single person come forward and admit their unconscious bias. NOT one! Can you name another?

      I have survived breast cancer twice and if people had been more upfront and honest about the influence of food on the body many many years ago. I just may have not got cancer the second time around. Had people not made assumptions about cultural influence on eating habits I just may have got better support .Had people been more attune to the importance of Cultural inclusiveness I may have gotten better education and support around food. Especially when you are trying to make dietary changes that could save your life. It’s a starting point that she has noticed the lack of inclusion. And Yes it took Sylvia to point it out, but it’s as simple as this…TODAY she has seen it, and that can only be a good thing.

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    3. DR

      Come on, Michele. You’re just trolling.

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    4. Mike C

      Michele – Maybe you have issues on your own side of the fence to deal with/work on before elevating your own EGO with judgements and advising others on what THEY should do. Just thinkin’…

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    5. Lynda Hahn

      She was apologizing Michele, how cruel you are to take her to task. I’ve been with BLE for almost 5 years and she is the most honest person I’ve ever met. Too honest sometimes. How dare you, you don’t know her. Get a life!

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    6. Cathy Sue

      Michele… as I read your response I can’t help but wonder why you are so unforgiving. Susan is reaching out for our support. Love and prayers for her continued courage to admit her mistakes. This is what is needed throughout this entire world. Deepening sensitivity is emerging in ALL of us because of Susan’s willingness to step out and risk her life and livelihood for the greater good. May you be included in this healing. God bless.

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  7. Ronna Berezin

    I believe that you, Susan have some serious confusion and issues about race and culture , and here’s where your deficits in understanding many things ,but primarily yourself prevent you from getting a grasp on how enormous this challenge really is. You might benefit from professional one on one counseling because your reactions to and confusion about this situation are disturbing given your responsibilities in your field.

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    1. Joseph

      Ronna, as she always does, Susan is facing her issues on this and she’s taking steps to make herself better. It’s what she always does. But along with so many others in this comment section, thou protesteth too loudly!
      Joseph in Missoula

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      1. Lynda Hah

        Right on Joseph! Makes me wonder about these people and how cruel they can be.

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  8. Margo Stewart

    Awesome! It’s about time for a conscious effort in that direction from everyone.

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  9. Marilyn. Barrett

    Hi Susan,
    I’m so touched by the courage you showed to share from your heart.
    I celebrate the ways this will shift BLE and our world. Thank you for leaning in.
    So my daughter teaches a very powerful course in this area. Please feel free to contact me if I can connect you with her in order to find out if what she teaches is a fit.

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  10. Berni Foster

    Being aware and becoming an ally takes education and courage. Bravo Susan for this.

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  11. adeline

    I am opting out of your teaching because I do not want to learn from anyone who uses rap.

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    1. C.J.

      Good thing you don’t know about the background of all of your teachers because you probably wouldn’t have any education with a mindset like that. You sound like someone born in the land of perfect. Ps. Not all rap has negative words or lyrics. I am African American and I am an educator who just took a training called implicit bias. We ALL have it. Consciously or unconsciously. We ALL have it.

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  12. Jan Bond

    Hey Susan I am a person of color and and I noticed that in the videos. I live here in San Diego and lost the $50 because I decided to not come to the reunion.

    Last year you and your team helped me make incredible breakthroughs and lose almost 30 lbs. This year I felt lost and not included in your tribe for a couple of reasons, one of them being the emotional rollercoaster of politics and age. There were probably other factors. Thank you for sharing the impact of your experience with your friend Sylvia. Looking forward to what you will bring in the rest of 2019 and beyond. A real fan!

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  13. Mary Palafox

    The N word is never ok. Praying for complete reconciliation and restoration. Xo. 🙏🏼♥️

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  14. carol pruitt

    Susan May I suggest you take a public speaking course, there are some excellent ones available. Then I’d like to urge you to grow the hell up. Gangsta rap??! Really? How old are you? You present yourself as a tenured professor so shouldn’t your head be a lot more squared away? Didn’t you have to consider a wide variety of students and ethnicity. to be a professor. Often when listening to you I feel like you are out on a limb winging it and being captured by every new wind that blows by. It can be difficult to watch and listen as you huff and puff. I fear this movement will just fade away with such poor leadership. Get a grip woman , get some real help to navigate this business. Your the problem. I really thought about coming to the reunion this year and I’m so glad I didn’t.

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    1. Audra

      Please Susan don’t stop the gangster rap. I’m sorry folks but seeing those whom would normally never do gangsta rap actually do gangsta rap is dinner and a show for me. I love it and I do not get offended. Here we go now…”Now what you hear is not a test of rapping to the beat and me the crew and my friends are gonna try and move your feet, you see I am Wonder Mike and I like to say hello…” (Come on now, this isn’t about education it’s about fun and putting a little spark in the World”)

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    2. Jessica

      I’m a 44 year old white catholic accountant mother of 4 soccer mom, who LOOOOOOVES gangsta rap and R&B and all the amazing, excellent artists from the 80s, 90s, and early 2000s. Most of my friends are people of color. Grow the hell up? How about everyone here stop being damn snowflakes for someone liking something that “doesn’t fit in with their skin color”. Like black people I know who like country get crap for it. With ALL the BS in the world, people are getting their panties in a wad over friggin music?? Yeah ok I get the N word thing definitely, but holy hell all the whining in these comments! Get over yourselves with everything SPT has done to help people and you pick on her for music!

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      1. Gina

        High Five!

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      2. Cynthia

        What Gina said!… High Five!

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      3. Lynda Hahn

        Love it! Well said

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      4. Cathy Sue

        Me too Jessica!! I love it. I went back to college at the age of 35 in the 90’s. I lived in college housing and worked for the college as a student advisor. I was surrounded by ALL races, religions, ethnic backgrounds which include ALL kinds of music. I love it!! I loved connecting to others through their music. There are some real stories and expression of pain that need to be recognized for the art that it is!!

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      5. mary

        thank you Jessica. I also listen to music from the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s, country, rap, etc. I’m allowed to sing along to every genre, except rap? Give me a break. If the musicians don’t want us using the words when we sing along, than don’t put them in the song. I’m not being a racist by singing along, I’m just singing! I don’t silence myself when singing, no matter what the words are. The words are in the music, and that’s all they are….part of a song. Susan wasn’t being “unconsciously racist”, she was singing a darn song! …….but now were going to criticize her for being a forty something woman that listens to rap? What next? Seriously, this is out of hand. My kids listen to rap all of the time, so I have grown accustomed to some of it. And I’m 60 – so do I need to grow up? Should I only be listening to Frank Sinatra? Susan – you apologized. I hope you don’t apologize again, because some folks are using it as a whipping post….and frankly, I’m over this boloney. Anyone who follows you knows your heart. You have done so much for so many people….thank you for giving me the freedom that your program has given me. Thank you for your honesty and your kindness…always. You have not excluded anyone. Every single person has the same, equal opportunity to look up BLE and join, or not join. The price is the price……..maybe as you get bigger, there can be discounts offered, but for now, anyone who wants to and who wants to pay the money can join. No one has ever been turned down. Is question 6 on the Susceptibility Quiz “what color are you?”
        Of course not – because NO ONE CARES! If you have an issue with food and BLE seems like the answer for you, please join! It’s that simple – not “where are you from?”, “what is your nationality?”, “what is your skin color?” – of course not. ALL ARE WELCOME!!! Let’s please move on people.

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    3. Ania

      Carol… wow! First of all, this is a matter of being politically correct and NOT public speaking. Secondly, if you don’t have constructive criticism to give, just don’t say anything.

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  15. Cathy

    What you say Susan about invited vs included was something I really needed to hear. If like attracts like then why we in BLE inviting people “like us”. As most of the people I’ve met in BLE found out about it from a friend or colleague just like I did then I too need to work on how I can make BLE more inclusive. Thank you for talking about this and giving us pause to think about how we might take action too.

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    1. Lori Williams

      Susan, your courage and transparency is such an example to me. And this message hit home. I ask myself if I would have the courage to come forward like you did. I am not 100% sure I would. As I read so many negative, unloving, hateful, judgmental comments… whew! Makes me all the more aware of how far we as a society need to come to change the future for our children and grandchildren with Love. “Let she who is without sin cast the first stone. “ Creating BLE was an act of love and courage. It has saved my life and is allowing me to stand up and put myself out there in ways I did not have the courage to do before. Thank you. You stood up out of the foxhole that many of us hide in all our lives. I love you. You inspire me.

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  16. Lydia

    Thank you for caring about this issue and for committing to learning to be inclusive. Thank you for being humble and vulnerable.

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  17. Kate

    Hmmmmm! I’ve always understood BLE as a safe place for us all, and that includes Susan….. just sayin’

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    1. C.J.

      Love this!!! I sooooooooo agree💕💕

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    2. Cynthia

      kudos!

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    3. Cathy Sue

      AMEN!!

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  18. Pamela Adams

    Division is not just colour or gender. I live in a country that is not the USA and I feel a disconnect. I live in a different time zone and a different season. We all need to be mindful we all walk a different path.

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    1. Susan Peirce Thompson, PhD

      Yes. Totally. BLE is very US-centric.
      If you have thoughts about what would help you feel more included, I would love to hear them. I’m curious and open.
      And I appreciate you sharing this.
      With love,
      Susan

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      1. Catherine

        There is great work being done on diversity, equity and inclusion. We brought the National Equity Project into our business to work with the team to raise all of our understanding of implicit bias, and to create shared norms and agreements to improve our culture and interactions. Your marketing team also needs to look at modifying your approach to attract diverse audiences. It takes focused explicit intention, but it can be done. Good for you for owning the issue and caring enough to recalibrate.

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      2. Michelle Helmic

        We (you) cannot make others feel anything. We (you) only can show genuine love. It begins with us (you). Who is in your circle that is different than you? Start there and ask questions, build relationships, love deeply. In that, I believe, you will find direction. Keep expanding your circle of diversity and it will ripple out and flow into BLE. You are a researcher. I challenge you to take a whole year and dive in with both feet to explore this subject and you will have your answers. You have a huge capacity to love, and love is always the key! God bless you and I will pray for this next year of discovery for you as I know it will be a game changer! Hugs.

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      3. Maggie

        How about “rich-centric”. I understand that you have to make money but I could never in a million years afford the “family” gathering. At my family gatherings it would not be acceptable to leave out my family members that can’t afford to come.

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      4. deedee

        i would love to join . I tried but I can’t afford it. I have even reached out but your people had no time to talk. Only asked for money. I’m hispanic and I listen to your videos and feel they are great.👍🏽 wish i would of been a part .God Bless You

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  19. Cathy Sue

    WOW…..right on Susan!! This is the beginning of new healing. And for you to bring it out like that demonstrates a level of courage that will lead you to the awareness you seek. WOW… I’ve been working with a Guru who’s entire program is focused on understanding racism and being able to identify it in our own thought. This is a process that will only move forward as we are able to fully engage in this type of honesty and open acknowledgement of the learned hatred we have been raised on. This is not a time to blame or judge or turn away. This is a time to celebrate and lift up our brethren, which will in turn help us reflect on our own thought and help us to be aware of the hatred that is the source of all disease… including our self destructive eating behaviors that have forced us to need what you Susan was divinely inspired to bring forward. Thank you. May we all open our hearts to allow Love to do the work that only Love can do!!! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

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  20. Natalie

    Hugs!!! Much love is needed here! I found some of the comments to be very harsh and wanted to be quiet but just couldn’t. I was there and didn’t catch what happened. I don’t think the sound was clear for me because most of the talking wasn’t audible for me. I don’t like that word but I also think that we need to be loving towards everyone and it is never OK to tear someone down.

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  21. Martha Myers

    I love that you are vulnerable and authentic and have not stopped growing. What a bright light example you are. Thank you.

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  22. Joseph

    What projection! The many negative comments help confirm what we already know: that surrounding the issue of race, Americans, especially white ones, have had their minds bent. It happens early in life, and it’s widely pervasive. It’s what would be expected in a country whose culture is steeped in a long legacy of the most brutal slavery the world has ever known. It lasted hundreds of years. Those who jumped on Susan need to look in the mirror and tackle their own demons. We’ve all been infected, we are not immune.
    Joseph in Missoula

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  23. Paula

    Susan, I am an African-American woman. I want to commend you for having the courage and willingness to learn and grow. You are amazing. Thank you for taking the time to be aware. It doesn’t matter what you may not know, but that your willing to see. I hope that one day we can connect and meet and learn from each other. Thank you for sharing the difference between “Invited” and “Included”. Bless you.

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  24. Rebecca

    I’m deep in inclusion and diversity in my work currently. I do agree with your observations, Susan, that the programme is very US centric. For me, this includes celebrations, language, content, programme scheduling, delivery, finding buddies/mastermind groups and accessible support. Perhaps it is time to create satellite hubs with coaches in other countries? For example, accessing the coaching calls during Bootcamp was impossible – calls were scheduled during work hours for 2 hour blocks which I couldn’t accommodate without it impacting other responsibilities. I suspect they worked well for the US time zones but not so great in the southern hemisphere. Another lens for inclusion is to think about the one thing that makes us unique and it may not be the most obvious – I attended a Men As Allies workshop and we were asked to share one thing that makes us unique – it was necessarily gender, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation – we had a trained opera singer, a cheese maker, film maker, burlesque dancer, etc, etc. For me, this made me realise that we are all unique in some way. I wish you well with this journey and trust there is deep learning ahead. Go gently.

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    1. Janelle Trees

      I’m an Australian woman of Aboriginal descent. Good suggestions here from Rebecca.
      As an antipodean, I have felt that the Bootcamp and communities are not great value for me because of the time difference. We also pay more for courses in US dollars. These things inhibited me from subscribing to the online relay of the meeting.
      I also find that my FB support group is available to me at a delay. I’m always 12 hours late in the conversation. Or speaking out while the others sleep.
      My US-based white American buddies there do their best to relate to my situation, but I do feel like an alien sometimes. There are only about a dozen women in the group who join the discussion (from about 200 people, I think. What do the others do? Lurk and eat NMF, I guess).
      I’m a lesbian, as well, which makes me more exotic.
      I have wondered whether it would be possible to have a FB BLE support community for lesbians, or for Indigenous people. Even an Australian-based support group, or a US-based rainbow flag group would be a start. We need safe spaces to bring our full selves to–this will give us more confidence in stepping into the BLE mainstream with all those gorgeous white Christian women.

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      1. Kathy

        There is Facebook Special Interest Group for LGBTQI Bright Lifers.

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      2. C.J.

        Perhaps this is a call for you to create a community where you live. 💕

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      3. Stephani Horstman

        I would also LOVE and benefit from a LGBTQ-centric group on FB for BLE. I’m not a Bright Lifer but would be willing to be a moderator/co-founder of a LGBTQ group on Facebook. Let me know if you’d like some assistance in creating such a group. I’m not sure of the process to get it officially sanctioned as a BLE group, but I’ll do some research and try to find you on FB to share what I learn.

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  25. Deborah

    While I commend you Susan for sharing your feelings, I suggest that the issue is one of respect – simple respect for other human beings. I live in a land of “brown” people and never once have I felt not included or felt the need to make the distinction with them. Their culture is different from what I grew up in and is a wonderful opportunity for me to broaden my life experience. I lived in a small town growing up in the states and there were several “black” kids I was close friends with. Never once would I have considered that they were different or not equal to me in any way! I treated them as we all should treat people – we are all part of the species labeled “human.” Yes, cultures are different and life experiences are different but we are all humans. We all have the same wants, needs, and desires in this world regardless of what that looks like to each individual. Even for you to label people as “people of color” is racist! How would you feel to always be labeled a “white” woman? Yes, I understand that the world is quite divisive at the moment and that is sad. What is even sadder is to see that any label you might apply to another human being is hurtful! I apologize to your friend for your failure to respect her as the human being she is. I can’t tell if you get that.

    Reply ·
  26. Naomi

    I want to weigh in some feedback for you from a Black, African-American, 25-year old’s prospective. First, when I saw the title and your face, I already knew what this video would be about before I clicked it. I wasn’t expecting you to admit you said the n-word, but I wasn’t shocked. And I’m not saying that to make u feel bad about yourself or to say u just ooze racism, but to say this is common in black people world. It IS UNACCEPTABLE, but I KNEW you were gonna talk about this community being uninclusive for Black people. I knew this because about 80% of the time, I also don’t feel understood or embraced in this community, and I believe cultural background has a great deal to do with it. Second, you took full responsibility for the room not having men and probably only a few specks of women of color. I want to relieve you of that. It is NOT your fault. These outcomes are the result of societal structures and ideas that were built hundreds of years ago and are maintained daily by the entire nation in every aspect of life by our collectively being complicit and going along with the status quo. it is not your fault that it’s acceptable for men to be fat and ugly whereas women are judged harshly for their bodies and appearance. it’s not your fault men are less likely to care about their weight even if it kills them because being weight-conscious is considered “girly”. it is not your fault that black people have been discriminated against for centuries, and it makes self-help programs like BLE financially and mentally out of the question for most black ppl. it is not your fault that black people have a completely different culture that makes the idea of eating the BL way completely absurd, even if we were likely to know about it and could afford it. All those sexist and racist ideas were created by the church, the government and other powerful rich white guys long ago. However, you are spot on to say that There IS something that YOU can do to alleviate these realities as a leader of this movement, and it will take A LOT of work on your part, and you’ll probably need outside help. very true. Also, to speak on this idea of black people feeling unincluded. I can tell your heart aches for us because of this, considering your past with social acceptance as a child, but I want you to know that this is typical in America. All black people, are fully aware that we are not welcomed, valued, or cared about ANYWHERE but at our own homes, and sometimes not even there. so don’t take it so hard. it is just a reality of being black in America. Not only do we seldom fit in anywhere outside our micro-community, our lives are often in danger just from walking around, driving around, minding our own business, we can be the target of hate or violence for no good reason. this is our DAILY reality. it’s why we have such tough skin. (or why we’re always “angry” as people like to refer to us. Clearly we have reasons to be!…I digress) we’re always being bullied and beat up on. it’s almost expected for some white person to disrespect us or say the n-word. it’s just another day in the life of being black. if u are a black person trying to improve your life, because it’s so uncommon from black people to be able to do this, we are ALWAYS a minority in nice places of business, elite institutions, YOGA, in careers that are lucrative, at Whole Foods. nothing NICE is designed with us in mind. the only things that are designed for us kill us, exploit us, or give us low self esteem. as black people, we take this world in doses. And yes I’ve always felt like the weirdo speaking in my Gideon games group and commenting in every FB page and even in my MM group. one of the members dropped out because me just being me, bothered the mess out of her. I was too different. The social shunning is unfortunately simply ONE ASPECT of the extra adversity that black people must counteract to become happy, thin, and free, but it aint new to us. ask me how I felt when I was the only black girl studying civil engineering in a PhD program at Duke University. I felt the same unincluded, misunderstood way that I feel as a BLifer. that I feel everyday, everywhere, ever since I realized my hair didn’t make bangs. all this to say, it seemed like this was a big moment for u, and that’s beautiful but for us, it’s just another day.

    Reply ·
    1. Janelle Trees

      Powerfully articulated, Naomi. Thank you.

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    2. Janine

      Dear Naomi, thank you so very much for articulating this. I am a white woman. And without knowing the details which you so beautifully expressed, I have at times tried to imagine myself in another’s shoes and gotten glimpses of what you describe and it saddens me deeply and I’ve felt helpless to remedy it. I am in my early fifties, and I’m only now trying to figure out what little I can do, in terms of using my privilege to advocate for people of color when I see something unjust happening that is motivated by systemic or overt racism; to educate myself on how systemic racism presents itself, and to examine my own cultural and unconscious biases. It’s tough work, and exhausting, not in the way that living inside the skin of a person of color is exhausting, but in the sense that it is my duty as someone privileged to advocate for EVERY oppressed group, and sometimes people from oppressed groups vote against the civil rights interests of other oppressed groups, but if that makes me angry, I’m supposed to stuff it because any criticism coming from me is a micro-aggression. As a semi-professional artist cobbling things together discovering how all the financial values my middle-class family taught me don’t add up when you live below the poverty line, economists don’t even include us in their data. They call us Class X. And from that perspective, I am right on the cusp between being attracted to this program, and not committing to it. There are a lot of other reasons why I don’t, but that’s the one that enables me to relate to what you are saying. Anyway, thank you again for saying it.

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    3. Kelly

      Naomi. So perfectly articulated. Susan, thank you for the awareness. I was at the reunion as a 50 year old African American woman. I received (in my heart) your sincere apology. I loved my reunion experience and I look forward to being part of an inclusive BLE community. The hurdles are tall. Thank you for recognizing and taking it on. What is most encouraging is that while at the reunion I did feel that my authentic self was loved and I didn’t have to try to acclimate to feel loved. (Interesting side bar, I’ve shared BLE with several, 50/50 minority/non-minority that have struggled with weight; only the non-minority have actually purchased the inexpensive book with a few continuing to the actual boot camp. For sure our community has cultural barriers in addition to BLE being headed by a White, “privileged “, middle aged woman.).

      Second side bar, I attend many optional meetings and such where I am the only one. Just a leader walking up to me at the meeting (privately) and acknowledging to me privately and asking for help creates a feeling of inclusivity versus “ Invitedness”. ..or when a non-minority person says ahead you might be the only one there, or even noticing it…makes a huge difference .

      So, nothing but love from me to you, Susan , and BLE. Thank you Sylvia for being brave to have the hard lunch conversation . Congrats BLE team for noticing. (I was wondering how you received the info so quickly when I was listening to the apology. ). Thank you for creating a safe environment and noticing when it failed to be such. Thank you Sylvia for being brave enough (and safe enough) to express what you were feeling, in that moment, openly. Love to you also.

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    4. Marta

      Thank you, Naomi! Thank you for lovingly stating your truth. Blessings.

      Reply ·
    5. C.J.

      Oooooohhhhh… I know you meant well but my dear… please don’t speak for all black people. I wonder if you would’ve written everything here in first person if that would’ve been better.

      “All black people, are fully aware that we are not welcomed, valued, or cared about ANYWHERE but at our own homes, and sometimes not even there”….

      NOT My reality. Speak for yourself. This is YOUR experience. Own it. I mean no disrespect by saying this. To me you are just giving people who may not know much about black people a very limited and oppressed view that is not everyone’s reality.

      “black people have been discriminated against for centuries, and it makes self-help programs like BLE financially and mentally out of the question for most black ppl. it is not your fault that black people have a completely different culture that makes the idea of eating the BL way completely absurd, even if we were likely to know about it and could afford it. “

      While I know that the word eating disorders is not used a lot in our community… and culturally rich and excessive eating can sometimes be seen as “normal”…I know many black people who are in overeaters anonymous and who are quite familiar with food plans and weighing and measuring. Also to assume that all black people can’t afford BLE is untrue. I think the affordability can go across the board as it can be a struggle for MANY people of all different races. Now the ironic thing though… is that I could’ve probably bought 3 homes with the binge money I’ve spent over the years… but that’s another post. Lol… anyhoo… yeah… these are my thought. No shade… I just don’t love being spoken for

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    6. Cathy Sue

      Thank you Naomi

      Reply ·
  27. Wendy

    What a bunch of crap! You are just trying to target another what you think is a “group of people” to get on board to Brite lines eating but the wrong way!! This has nothing to do with where we came from , color, race,religion!

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    1. Yolie

      What! How can you be so dismissive? You’ve just done it again . You know her life and experiences better than her? I am also a person of color and what Naomi is expressing is her truth and her experience and it rings true.

      Reply ·
      1. Susan Peirce Thompson

        Yolie, I don’t think Wendy is directing her comment to Naomi, I think she’s directing her comment to me. Wendy is saying that my video was a bunch of crap.
        Thank you for being here, in the conversation.
        With love,
        Susan

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        1. Yolie

          Thanks for the clarification . Sorry Wendy.

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        2. Cathy Sue

          Even so Susan… You don’t deserve that kind of disrespect. None of us do. That’s not constructive. It destructive negativity . Many others have confronted this situation and expressed their pain with love and forgiveness. To me, those who are being harsh and unforgiving are as disrespectful as they are accusing you of being.

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  28. Andrea Hirschfeld

    Susan, you are fortunate this incident opened your eyes in a hopefully loving environment. I know you’re looking for real data before moving bright line eating into the mainstream, but if it’s going to be accessible and available to everyone you have to promote it in a more worldly way. A movement means promoting a revolution. Start with why. You’re product is no more exclusive than MAC products. Make it simpler, more accessible, and promote your mission broadly-add tv and radio. I wondered why JLo got all kinds of media coverage with her no sugar diet but you didn’t -with all the folks and metrics for success you have! Good luck with your work in this arena. It’s complicated but I know you’ll have great success in time!! You’re brilliant, and you and your team think very critically.

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  29. Sonja Toutenhoofd

    Hi Susan, I enjoy and am inspired and educated by your videos and appreciate your willingness to face this topic.
    Here are a few ideas: My daughter (a pretty savvy teen) feels the combo of the words “happy and thin” (not the word free) do not attract the younger crowd (teens) because teens see that as part of the culture that advertising tries to link being thin with being happy etc. I know what you mean and love the content that I’ve come across in your BLE and can look past that and I get what you mean. Modern teens might respond more to “happy, right-sized, and free” or something like that.
    Another idea: as BLE grows consider having guest hosts of many ages and colors and identities present the topic of the day.
    I’ll hold you in the light as we all travel this journey together.

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  30. naomi

    Also, wow some people’s comments here are just so antagonizing. she said she knows she has a problem, and she’s going to get help. People, sheesh! Wagging your finger, isn’t helping. she already feels remorseful, so no need to make her feel worse. this is also a reason, I don’t feel included in this community a lot of times. u try to open up and relate to people, sharing your stories or struggles and lots of people can’t engage with it, without telling u how u’re wrong. lots of people can’t understand the difference between someone authentically opening up about a problem they have, wanting to be heard and people obliviously shooting off at the mouth.

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    1. Marty Desmond

      Thank you, Naomi! As a 50 something white man, I have very little in common with you on the surface, but I find a lot of wisdom in your comments and see where we share some of the same concerns. Saying that we agree on BLE feeling like a white girls club is easy. Let’s set that aside. I’m going to say that what you say in this comment is common ground for us. Thanks for participating. Thanks for caring enough to re-engage. I gave feedback after my boot camp to make this feel more inclusive from a male perspective, and have never spoken to anyone about it. I can see where you would be valuable in shaping a more diverse and open movement. I hope you consider that. I hope to someday be able to work with you on that.

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  31. Anne

    Thank you Susan and Sylvia for entering into and contributing to the awakening that this country (and the globe) needs to do to become inclusive at all levels of society. We, each in our own ways, are unconscious of the “water” we swim in. It takes courage to look carefully at myself, my privilege, my hurts, my gaffes, my good intentions. There are many perspectives that can shock me when I realize I have just stepped on another’s toes in pursuing what I consider my best work in being related to others. This program is valuable and has a lot to contribute to being a fully functioning human being , since we all need to eat to survive. How we all go about sharing it can be a shining example embarking on the road to greater inclusivity, or not. May it develop into that shining example with all of us contributing.

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  32. Karen Jepsen

    I was very moved by the message. Sometimes we are so passionate about our work that it takes a minute to see with needed perspective. I am excited to see how BLE evolves from here. There is much to learn and room to grow. Keep moving forward.
    I am grateful for how my life has improved with BLE. May the path for others become clear as well.

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  33. Mary Smith

    Susan I think your Bright Line eating followers are mainly white middle aged women who can afford to pay for your boot camp and other activities.

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  34. Fiya

    Hi Susan, As 43 year old African American Woman just wanted to say thank you for your vulnerability and transparency. Also I know that “ white” people aren’t suppose to use the N- word but here’s the thing it’s all in these songs and you were just singing along to the Lyrics. You should be able to innocently sing along with a song. If you were using the word with malice intent that would be different. Also as far as it not being a lot of people of color I don’t believe that’s your fault as like attracts like. I found you because I am a woman who is very open and sees myself as being apart of the Human Race and not focusing on color, therefore I usually find myself being one of the few African Americans and that’s ok with me. I felt your sincerity and I wanted to let you know that you are human and that I don’t believe you had any malice .
    Peace and Blessings

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  35. Vanessa Timmons

    Thanks so much for this post. As a Black women I am deeply grateful for your thoughtfulness. I am not a brightline eater yet, but I plan to explore it more deeply.

    Blessed be

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  36. jamie

    I am praying for peace for your heart, Susan and for wisdom for each step forward. I am praying for comfort for the women that was hurt by your actions. I pray for those who have commented in such mean and hateful ways. What a tough position to be in… a leader and imperfect. I am praying we can all be filled with love and grace and understanding as we navigate so many tough issues. I see your heart, I hope those around me see mine. I make mistakes and I grow, I am thankful for the people in our lives who are willing to love us through our mistakes and teach us with love and forgiveness. I am thankful for Jesus Christ’s example of love, sacrifice, forgiveness by laying down his life for those who were beating him, insulting him, hating him.

    Reply ·
    1. Margaret Terris

      Amen x

      Reply ·
  37. Greta

    Thank YOU!
    When I first got into the Bootcamp I had already about 200 bright days behind me and still procrastinated to post on Facebook because I felt as if I didn’t belong there. I was from Europe, and spoke completely different language. I had no weight to loose. I felt fine. I was still ashamed to admit that BLE was the only way that saved me from dying. Literally!! I have left 20 years of suffering from anorexia and bulimia behind my back because I’ve read the Book! I have followed it to a t. And despite it all I felt weird, slow, different. I’m not quite sure it actually relates to such a serious topic Susan speaks here about. Therefore I just want to bow down to everything You do in this life. By saving such “small” people like me from dying. By elating me, changing me and saying – I am one of you, I do belong. Thank YOU.

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  38. Elana Schachter

    I am surprised that nobody has mentioned economic inequality. The participants in the Family Reunion, and to some extent in BLE in general, are a self-selected group of people who are wealthy enough to have hundreds, or even thousands of dollars of discretionary income. I wonder why you found it necessary to charge $97 for the live stream, when it certainly doesn’t cost that much, and it would have been an easy way to be more inclusive to make it free, or to charge a minimal fee. I know that you, SPT, have spoken about bringing BLE to urban food deserts, to schools, to underprivileged communities, to international communities, etc. Yes, it is a business, and I appreciate how much you are doing, but I am curious what progress is being made toward those non-elitist goals. BLE has created special interest groups for minorities of all sorts. Maybe a special interest group for people of color is in order.

    Reply ·
    1. Nancy Masterson-Newkirk

      Elana, I agree with you 100%! The program currently pre-selects for people with discretionary income and time. That has to be taken into account when trying to expand the program. The program is fantastic.

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  39. Sarah Katzin

    I commend Susan for having the courage to speak up about her faux pas and commit to humbly learning more in order to make changes. I love on one hand that Susan is so natural and fun (hence the rapping) but on the other hand, personally find it jarring at times how freely she uses the “f” word, let alone the “n” word. I agree with Elana Schachter and some others that the affordability of the program, and especially of the Reunion, largely affects who is “included”. I am very grateful that when it came time to renew my Bright Lifers membership and I wrote in to Support, I was given a discount I could live with, but even for this I had to have made a considerable investment up until that point. For many people, both in the US and throughout the world, getting through the door is currently impossible.

    Reply ·
  40. Kafui

    This might be stating the obvious, but the high cost of BLE programs will always keep out a huge number of people.

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  41. Lindy

    Thank you for this Susan.
    These last few days, certain ugly tweets have made me look at myself and see that there is ugliness in me. I am a white person living in a multicultural city and though I truly want to be an inclusive person, I know that I have a long way to go. I deeply respect your willingness to acknowledge that you caused hurt in a person of colour and your willingness to work on yourself and your unconscious prejudices. I am going to do the same. That there are some people who find it hard to believe that you are genuine in what you have said indicates that all of us have prejudices. That is one area at least that is truly inclusive.
    I am European and I too feel somewhat excluded from aspects of BLE. (I’m not for a moment speaking of this exclusion as on a par with the experience of people of colour in white society which Naomi pointed out so eloquently.) It’s early days for BLE. and all movements have to start somewhere and since BLE started in the USA it’s probably inevitable that it is somewhat USA-centric. I hope the movement will become more truly international in time. Travelling to America for the family reunion is out of the question for me and I have found myself drifting away from BLE to more accessible methods of weight loss. I feel a long way away.
    But again, thank you for helping me to look at myself. If we don’t see the ugliness we can’t adadress the ugliness.

    Reply ·
  42. Kathy Cosgrove

    Thank you both – your honesty and courage is wonderful. I’m white and middle class. I’ve done a little work with unconscious bias (not only around colour) and been shocked at what I’ve found. However, I think seeing and owning it is the first step and understanding where it comes from (media/family/culture/etc) is the next before we can change. I definitely need to do more and I’m so glad that BLE is honouring this work. The painful experience has been turned into opportunity by you both showing true friendship. Amazing.

    Reply ·
  43. Lisa Pitt

    Thank you SPT,
    made me realise that even on a close family level I need to be more inclusive and not just invite family over. Great vlog

    Reply ·
  44. Missy

    Xoxo Fiya.

    Reply ·
  45. Krystal Vickers

    Thank you Susan. This went deep into my soul. I’ve been wanting this for a lifetime.

    Reply ·
  46. SVGM

    There have been a lot of hurts with BLE over the past 4 years of my association… No one has ever reached out. This is my third comment! I don’t think you really want to know individual experiences. You select what works for your Blog or topic of the week.

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      SVGM, We are so very sorry and sad to hear this. We’d love to talk to you more about your concerns and your suffering and how we can help and improve. Can you please contact our support team by going to support.brightlineeating.com? Hope to hear from you there so we can continue this conversation. <3

      Reply ·
  47. Laurie Ploude

    Wow!
    Thank you all for your comments both kind and harsh. I am a middle aged white woman. I know that we don’t mean for BLE to be an “exclusive club”. The BLE community is one of the most loving, safe, places to be.
    I am excited that SPT will be exploring different ways to make this journey more inclusive for everyone.
    It’s often our biggest mistakes give us the best opportunities for growth and redirection.
    Honestly, we can all use lessons on what it’s like to feel shunned and to be educated on how to achieve this.
    Looking forward to brighter days.
    Instead of bashing Susan for what happened, perhaps you could offer to be part of a round table discussion on where she could improve. What better forum to learn from than those who feel oppressed.
    Truthfully, I have limited understanding myself. But I want to know more.
    Blessings

    Reply ·
  48. Melissa Kerby

    Economics. Try to reach public school system and programs that serve youth in less affluent areas than has been your economic bas during BLE launch phase. As is usually if not always the case when building a product from a grassroots level, there has to be economic support. As you are able to pitch off a solid base, strive to target (beyond a library book) those who need a more direct mentoring.

    An aside – if you’ve not yet budgeted or analyzed how testimonials might enable growth, might be something to consider. While upper middle /middle class females have been a good market. Continue to grow that base (target the men of that economic base) so as to reach into less economically affluent communities.

    Thanks for your transparency and openness to learn and grow. Your optimism and openness is allows that. We appreciate you.

    Reply ·
  49. Selena

    Susan has been fooling people for a long time. Now she shows her true “color”. I love BLE, but when I tell my friends and family I am careful not to invite them to join because it’s basically for white women. I rave about how easy it is to change your life style eating habits, but I tell them to make it their own because following the BLE plan is not the way we eat. The ideology is GREAT. The people…not so much. Susan, if you actually change the way you promote BLE to focus on being a solution and not a club, then perhaps you really can be inclusive.

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  50. Ann

    I’m pleased to see/read this conversation. As a white mother to three children of color, I have had to become alert to the ways white skinned privilege is unacknowledged, blindly expressed and overlooked. It’s an on-going learning process. I hesitate to suggest BLE to my daughter (who wants to lose weight) because there are no black faces anywhere on the website, vlog, etc. I’ll be looking forward to the face, and heart of BLE becoming more inclusive.

    Reply ·
  51. Jayne Peterson

    Susan Thank you for sharing honestly and giving voice to your and Sylvia’s experience in a public forum and stating publicly the need to learn and grow. Sylvia thank you for being courageous and speaking up! Learning about the systematic effects of racism is important work NOW and each of us in the dominant white culture must individually take responsibility for our own learning as it relates to racism, racial justice, white privilege, white fragility…deeply listening is a great place to start. We must not rely on the voices of people of color to “teach us” but take responsibility for our own learning. I have been on this journey for a couple of years after an African Nurse in a nurse coaching collective I belong to started naming in our group issues of racism and thankfully in a brief moment of awareness I saw the red flags of defensiveness in my own being which led me to some deep inner work. Here are some resources for you. I have worked with Nikki Akpawera RN, MSN, MPH, a black nurse coach who supports and leads individuals and businesses towards racial justice and inclusive leadership. You can find her at http://www.diversityandinclusioncoach.com. Nikki, myself and another nurse are reaching out and developing continuing education for nurses on this issue. A reading list we have put together includes:
    So you want to talk about race, Ijeoma Oluo-(excellent straight forward clear, concise read-a great beginning)
    White Fragility, Robin DiAngelo
    Mindful of Race, Ruth King
    Between the World and Me-Ta Nehisi Coates The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead
    Homegoing, Yaa Gyasi
    A Gardener’s Tale: Camara Jones
    I also follow and read
    Dr Amanda Kemp who also offers coaching around racial justice, online.
    Teaching Tolerance-Harvard Implicit Bias Project https://www.tolerance.org/professional-development/test-yourself-for-hidden-bias

    May this conversation open the door for many to deepen their learning around racism and become change makers and advocates for racial justice in small and big ways.
    Again, thank you!
    Jayne

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  52. teri crockford

    Susan, I appreciate the vlog and am constantly learning myself as the landscape of my community and language is changing.
    It may be appropriate to look at your team, as excellent as they are there are few visible minorities represented…good place to begin…

    Reply ·
  53. Kathrin

    Hi Susan,
    I have never met a person who exuedes love like you do. I hear it in your voice in your books and from all your vlogs. The love you put forth is so much greater than the hurt you are feeling right now. You have already learned a lesson. And although I wasn’t there it’s hard to believe you meant to shame or hurt anyone. People have to include themselves in the BLE community too. All I’ve ever felt from you is inclusion. Many people of color are hurting again. Humans come in many shades of skin tones, we are all humans. By the way dear Susan, you’ve invited everyone! Too be included YOU have to get with the program, join in!

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  54. Ruth

    There is another community of people who feel left out of BLE, those of modest means. I understand that BLE is a business but there is so much emphasis on things that many of us will never be able to access, the “Family “ Reunion for one. It certainly doesn’t make one feel part of the tribe when many cannot fly across the country and spend hundreds of dollars at “a beautiful resort”. If SPT really wanted to include us vs invite us to things, every “best thing ever, most important learning ever” like parts work and the reunion would not come with such a high price tag. BLE is becoming yet another example of upper middle class privilege.

    Reply ·
    1. Stephanie

      I am not a member of BLE, but I watch the videos and I have read the articles and agree with Ruth it is expensive
      and it is geared toward upper middle class. Simple fact is it was set up for your socioeconomic group.
      Why the Rap music in the first place. I do not think you were trying to reach a group of Millennials or Gen Z’s.
      The world is full of beautiful music. As for not feeling included, I think everyone has felt that way sometime in their life.
      PS I live in the suburbs in Florida. I can safely guess 60% of my neighbors are African Americans.

      Reply ·
    2. Raina

      I’m an event planner, it is truly expensive to rent venues for events like this. I didn’t go, but my Doctor did and for that I’m grateful. If you’re looking at just the building alone, it probably cost at least $80,000 to rent the entire venue for the time allotted. Then you have food and beverage on top of which most venue’s charge at least 17-18% service/gratuity fees. Food and Beverage alone is likely in the $80,000 mark too. Then venues can add AV equipment fees, wireless access fees on top of that. Plus you have room block fees, if an event does not meet their allotted guest number, they get charged a percentage of the rooms NOT used. At best, breaking even is hard to do when holding events like this. I don’t know how much the registration cost but I can tell you, based on the events I’ve held, breaking even is a miracle if you want to put on an event that your guests will enjoy. No matter how much she wanted to, I sincerely doubt she could have made it any less and given the same level of quality that I would expect. Conferences of all kinds, across the country, are expensive. This one is no different. But you’re right, I’m one of those ‘of modest means’, and it would have been nice to go, but in all honesty, I have more important things to do with my money. I’m getting knowledge and support from SPT through her vlogs, her personal journey, so it’s really up to the participant to decide ‘Is this enough, do I need more?’. I do not, I don’t need to feel included to take advantage of what she’s teaching, when you go to a classroom, its just as much your responsibility as a student to learn what their teaching even if you dislike the teacher. I’ve had plenty of professors that I couldn’t stand, but that didn’t invalidate their knowledge of the subject I needed to learn. My apologies if this turned into a rant, it was not personal, I just wanted to clarify that there are things behind the scenes that most people are not aware of.

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      1. Rose

        Your right. Back in the days I would wonder why I had to pay for a box lunch that cost as much as a nice dinner out until I was on the other side and learned the many details and charges for everything. You just don’t know what you don’t know. Thanks Raina for the breakdown.

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  55. Elena

    Dear Sylvia, know that you are loved no matter what!!! In spite of the beat downs that you face in your life, keep your heart open for all the love that you deserve!! I may not know you, but I send my love to you!

    Dear Susan, yup, that was screw up for sure. Reconcile. Atone. Learn. Improve. I look forward to watching your growth from this point forward, and learning and embracing your upcoming lessons to drive change in my own self to be a better human to all my fellow humans.

    May all hearts feel love today and always!

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  56. Ann Holley

    Thank you Susan for being your highest self. I am not afraid of hard work. SISU

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  57. Dawn

    I think the first major step towards inclusiveness is to bring down the price/cost for BLE classes, camps, seminars, etc. I have followed the book and the program, but I have not done anything that requires payment. And I would be considered privileged. So if I find it hard to spend the money, I imagine it must feel impossible for those who are more socioeconomically challenged.

    Reply ·
    1. Gretchen

      Part of the ongoing issue from people on the outside, from what I’ve been told by an outsider, is that BLE is largely patterned after OA – Overeaters Anonymous. A big difference however is that OA is free and based on the tenet of public service. As you can see BLE is a business with employees. SPT has made past remarks about the price she charges and it needing to be what it is in order to pay the team a living wage. But there you have it. It’s still pretty exclusive. Even a middle-age white woman like me can’t justify the costs to do Boot Camp and all that comes after – it’s just continued ongoing costs. While not to categorize every BIPOC as being of a lower socioeconomic means, it doesn’t surprise me at all about how homogeneous BLE is, simply due to money. If there is a desire to truly be more inclusive, there might need to be a huge business shakeup, like maybe moving towards a not-for-profit. Given the economics required to make it run, if it stays for profit, it may always be exclusive.

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  58. Dianne

    Susan, thank you for the willingness to publicly apologize for your lack of discretion with the use of offensive language. I did not attend the conference but like Sylvia, as woman of color I would have shared the same sense of angst. I want to be very careful to say that today our society is easily offended by so many things, some legit and perhaps others being overly sensitive; but the wounds are deep and it takes sensitivity, thoughtfulness, patience, and genuine caring to allow/promote healing. However; now is definitely the time to pursue this conversation in a way that we all put our swords on the table and “listen” to one another. If we are quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to anger, I believe the conversation might actually result in real progress. Even as I write this I know some will respond with anger but my hope is that we will all take a moment to breathe, and think before we speak. That our words will bring healing and not personal attacks. Yes, the time is right so let’s do this.

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  59. Sara

    I would love to find a way for BLE to work with and for those of us with disabilities, and those with different disabilities from all cultures and races.

    I’ve been slowly working out how to make BLE work for me and by myself I have made very little progress.

    I sit outside the group with my heavy prism lenses propped up with shaky hands and looking in at the rest of the class who get to dance and sing and rap (which IMO can only be done by lyrical and rhythmical geniuses) and reap all of the rewards and success BLE brings to those in the group.

    BLE as is, does not work for this person with many disabilities. The very essence of BLE relies upon consistency, commitment, and following bright lines.

    When you alone have to tweak BLE constantly to make it work invites too many accommodations that leaves one feeling like they’ve accommodated themselves right on out of true BLE. Outside over there.

    For BLE to become inclusive and accessible it is my personal experience that BLE needs to be adapted at the highest levels just like regular BLEs and then handed down and practiced just like regular BLEs. I can’t tell you how frustrating it is to write out meal plans every night and the next day, often filled with vomiting, are forced to adapt and fail your BL and plans. It’s maddening. And I haven’t solved how to make it work for 3 yrs but can solve a rubix cube in minutes.

    Thanks for reading and considering. Wouldn’t it be amazing to find a way for BLE to include everyone? Together we are all stronger and all the more beautiful!!!

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  60. Janine

    Dear Susan, I recommend taking a course in combating systemic racism, if you can find one,. It was uncomfortable for me, but made a huge difference in my life. And this book “Waking Up White: and Finding Myself in the Story of Race” also comes highly recommended and could really transform your perspective. How to address each others humanity in a systemically racist world without being color-blind is a confusing and scary journey. Bless you and take loving care, Janine
    https://www.amazon.com/Waking-Up-White-Finding-Myself-ebook/dp/B00HZZ1JD0

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  61. jamie

    Nobody is perfect. And I pray that you remember that you will not be able to fulfill every insight and request that you will get as feedback from this situation. Yes, learn from it. Yes, do something. But allow for grace for yourself, too.

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  62. Steve

    Good thing you didn’t show any cleavage, Susan!

    Come on folks, Susan took meaningful time during a highly emotional meeting setting to address this with the person, room and here. Allow her to apply the new wisdom going forward and further process her self observations!

    Forgive her, Forgive yourselves and don’t get distracted from the true reason you are here. It’s natural to place people on pedestals and sometime be disappointed when they are real, like us, and stumble.

    After hearing chants of “Send her home” and “Lock her up” on tv last night I refuse to join the hatred.

    Live YOUR Bright LInes!

    Reply ·
    1. Debbi Neher

      Thank you, Steve! Refusing to join the hatred gets my vote 🙂
      Susan Peirce Thompson, I appreciate your owning this issue with sincerity, and taking responsibility to grow from it. We will all benefit as BLE increases in diversity. Peace to all.

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  63. Pamela Pickens

    I am so sorry to see this nonsense here. Dr. Susan, you gave us a roadmap to wellness that was plain and simple and now it’s becoming politicized to the point where I have to call BS. Our brains on sugar and flour don’t give a crap what color, culture, neighborhood, experiences we’ve had. We are human beings. Period. That is our tribe. Always was always will be. Thank you for writing your book. I have it and appreciate your hard work that went into it. Anyone who has read it will know you simply wanted to share with EVERYONE what you learned along your journey and what you found in your research to support it. Thank you for your courage and yes, your humanity.

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  64. Gina

    Thank you for addressing this issue and thank you for stating that you would look for help on the issue. I see many areas that BLE needs to improve to make everyone feel included. From marketing images to the cost of the boot camp and everything in-between needs to be looked at. For example, I just went onto your website and did not see any diversity. The cost of the boot camp turns many people away as well. If you truly want to hit your goal number of Bright Lifers you will have to make some major changes. When I say diversity I don’t just mean people of various ethnic backgrounds, I am talking about a variety of races, colors, religions, national origins, ages, sexes and marital status.

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  65. Marian Babaoka

    Beautiful. So much integrity and humility. Susan, you are an awesome Chief for our tribe. Silvia, so much love to you, my BLE sister. ❤️

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  66. Jenny Partridge

    This was my second Family Reunion. And the BLE staff knocked it out of the park with the comprehensive support and professionalism. As a former leader with a large Pharma company, I comprehend the significant strategic planning that went into all the new offerings, as well as the operational planning to pull off this event. I’m still incredulous you were able to plan and implement the four new product offerings within 4 months. WHAAAAAT!!? While I understand and appreciate your acknowledgement and apology for the unintentional harm you caused others , I would like to encourage this not to be the punctuation mark for you and the BLE staff that diminishes the magnificence of this event. The experience for me, my roommate and my local tribe was nothing short of transformational. The phenomenal content of the new information, and the priceless camaraderie are two specific take aways that make me want to give all of you an eternal hug. Much love,

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  67. Marta

    Speaking up- Mexican American, 1/3 Native American 2/3 European descent. A mixed-mutt, born in NYC, to Mexican mom and Mexican-American dad. Lived in Puerto Rico most of my live. Spanish became my first language and English my 2nd, until living in the States as an adult. Lived in other countries too. I always have felt a little different, like I didn’t quite fit in. I was discriminated against from time to time. I’ve been shunned by whites and by blacks, and by Mexicans and by Americans.
    Now that my husband and I are retired, we “dropped” from high middle class to lower middle class. There are things I cannot afford to do, that I used to be able to afford before. Big deal! Big deal! Big deal? Nope. It isn’t a big deal, because I don’t let it be a big deal. Where I live, sometimes I get “the eye” from blue eyed blond with pink skin. Big deal! I don’t let it be a big deal. Sometimes people make fun of how I pronounced a word. Big deal! I don’t let it be a big deal. If I can’t afford to go to a BLE Family Reunion, I don’t go. If I can’t afford the livestream, I don’t pay for it. I don’t mope about it, I don’t think “see, here we go again, white privilege”. Nope. I function within the parameters of my life and the priorities in my life. I love to travel. I can’t travel much, but I accrue points with every purchase I make with my credit card to be able to travel with points.
    I bought the book. Wow! was that mind-blowing or what? I could afford that! I watch the weekly blog. Wow! All that content for free! At least, free for me, because I know it isn’t free for Susan to produce and upload and keep a website running, and people working, and organizing everything that needs to be organized.
    So, what is the point of all thing? Just this – be thankful of what you have received and can receive. Squeeze everything you can out of what you have and all you can do. BLE is here for us to be Happy, Thin and Free, not to cater to every kind of culture and subgroup. Inviting and including others is there for the rest of us to do. Let’s stop looking for slights, when none are intended. Let’s stop blaming and putting fault on others because of our own bias.
    Susan has issued the invitation. She has made so much available. Has given so much of herself to us. Are you willing to be included?

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    1. C.J.

      Marta???? Girl…. this is possibly one of the BEST and most WISE comments that I’ve read on here! I love EVERY WORD! So much personal power! High five 👋🏾 From this New Yawka! 🥰. Love it!!!!!

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    2. Raina

      Marta! This is awesome! I love it, thank you so much for saying this!

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    3. Nancy Houghtelin

      Marta…..awesome! A voice of reason and an attitude that will take you far!

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    4. Cynthia

      Marta, I love you! Very wisely stated from many of us that could not put in to works such grace.
      Thank you.

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    5. cathy sue

      Yikes… talk about taking a good look at our whiny ass feeling sorry for ourselves thoughts!! bravo! gratitude can open up abundance

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    6. Rose

      God bless you Marta. Love your attitude.

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  68. Christine Kemper

    Susan, I guess the Lord is leading you to a whole new place!
    Maybe it’s time to consider another crazy big hairy goal: delegating culturally and internationally. This way of eating is screaming (as you even stated yourself) that the world needs to know this information. It’s not just skin or culture, it’s helpful and healing by anyone no matter who they are. You need to train teachers and support and oversee these teacher/trainers around the world. Of all races, of all creeds and cultures. Sister, you could have the worlds largest and most compassionate and effective empire the world has ever known!! God made people, all people, who all WORK the same when it comes to simple whole nutrition and how we all process it. There are nuances and chemistry differences body to body, but in the end, if ya poop, ya had to have eaten! Make Sylvia a partner, she can speak to the African American population and bridge that gap you talked about. Make your international students partners and send them out armed with all this amazing info into their own cultures. Listen, listen….what are you hearing?? Yes….what is He telling you? Girl, I live in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada in Northern California. We don’t care as much about all the letters behind our names as the healing results we really are seeking. Our cultures don’t even meet and I’m Viking white, middle aged, homemaker and mom. The most denegrated person on earth because I don’t have a race to fight for nor do I have a mega education or profession….but my hand rocks the cradle that will soon be the future of this country and I’m teaching three boys the value of your program. Girlfriend, you’re being called to send out seeds that can take root in all the soils of the world. Do a teacher training program…create Bright Line Instructors, franchise your produce and let us talk to our communities wherever and who ever we are! I have only done your 14 day challenge, I’m not a boot camper and I wasn’t at your gathering in, but I know in my now healing gut that what you’ve brought to the world is so very valuable. Don’t ever forget that the higher we go in our own strength, the brighter we become to the One who humbled us to remember it’s by His strength that we exist and share and live. Much love to you! Here’s to the future!

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  69. Liz

    “Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America ” is a 2016 non-fiction book about race in the United States by Ibram X. Kendi that won the National Book Award for Nonfiction.

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  70. Nancy Houghtelin

    If I understand the situation correctly, the N word can be used by black people without repercussion…..but when uttered by a white person it’s a sin? Wow….isnt that RACIST?

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    1. Marta

      Wait! IS that what happened? The N word was in the rap and this whole thing exploded because of ACURATE rapping? Are we now muzzling each other?

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  71. C. J..

    One… two… three and to the four… snoop doggy dog and Dr. Dre is at the door… ready to make an entrance so back on up cuz you know we bout to rip sh_t up! Ok … that is from the Chronic CD from years ago… I am 47 years old… African American and I love MUSIC. Do I listen to a lot of rap? No… do I love some old school classics??? Absolutely. Do I also have Barry Mannillow , Sarah Mcglauglin , Christopher Cross and YES… BTS a KPOP group in my iTunes???… yes. I say all of this to say that music is universal. I can’t believe how much I love BTS and I’m knocking on 50!!! I’m glad Susan that you didn’t make an apology loving the music that you love. I don’t use the N word and as an educator I try to have my students not use it. I know that you didn’t use it maliciously. You repeated lyrics. I’m pretty certain that I would have mentioned it to you as well if I were at the reunion as it wasn’t a great choice to use it…and I did cringe a bit when you mentioned speaking about Sylvia that she wasn’t urban or gangster and didn’t fit in… I KNEW that you were probably using her words but at the same time I knew immediately what you repeating that would cause in commentland. I only wished that I was there to warn you of how it may not go over so well and it will seem as if YOU had a very limited view of black people. I know that is not true. I’ve always felt connected because the damn food thing is the GREAT equalizer. Beyond the food thing… I’ve always considered you a sister from another mister.

    While I know that there could be some more diversity in BLE… I don’t believe that is something that you should have to carry or be wholly responsible for. There are so many nuances. I’m often the only black person in the room whenever am at certain spiritual or self help events that interest me. I still experience a oneness because I don’t feel separate from others. I commend your bravery and transparency and your willingness to explore. It’s so interesting because I’ve imagined myself singing at a reunion. It’s the only original song I sing. I’ve wanted to share it because I’ve always felt a oneness in this community. While I am not as active as I use to be… the BLE community and you Susan will ALWAYS be in my heart. I love you eternally! Carllie Jaxen

    https://m.soundcloud.com/carllie-jaxen-1/we-are-one

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    1. cathy sue

      Great Song C.J.

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      1. C.J.

        Thanks Cathy👊🏾💕

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  72. Phyllis Johnson

    As a college instructor who teaches ESL and sometimes students with special needs, I know unequivocally that when we set inclusivity as a cornerstone of our program, we make room for everyone, which includes mainstream students/ persons in addition to those we are seeking to include. ALL benefit. In addition, we are modeling inclusivity to all participants. This means that we are teaching life lessons in addition to the content of our program. Susan, I see and hear the pain this realization has caused you. I know the BLE program will be better for your having wrestled with this issue. And I know the path to inclusivity will become clearer with reflection and consultation. We trust you to bring this successfully into fruition.

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  73. Sandie

    Susan,
    I wonder if weekly meetings , similar to the weight watchers model would work. No weighing in of course. I realize some ladies have started their own bright lifers of whatever city, but maybe something for non lifers would be appropriate. Obviously you’d need leader training, but it’s a way to get more involvement and support at a lower cost. I’m a lifer and other than following the four lines to the best of my ability, I really don’t use the other tools.

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  74. Raina

    Susan, you wear your heart on your sleeve and I cannot comprehend how much bravery it takes to put yourself out there to millions of people in your vlogs. For that you should be commended. I’m so glad my naturopath put me on your plan. As a society, we need to get obesity in the world on the ‘automatically covered’ status. If we’re forced to use insurance to pay for health care then by god I want obesity to be one of the first things 100% covered. I think your program has, by far, made the most sense in terms of WHY we are where we are. I’ve taken classes on the American food system and it’s utterly disgusting. Keep being you, we’re all human, we’re all fallible, we definitely ALL make mistakes and for you to openly admit and humble yourself just makes it that much harder for the rest of us to live up to your example, but by god, WHAT an example you are. Be you. Enjoy your gangsta rap, I’m a 43 year old white woman that loves thrash metal and gregorian chanting. Music doesn’t define who we are, how we treat others does. Thank you, sincerely, for being you.

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  75. Yaprak Buyukteoman

    Human-centered design and social innovation are great tools that organizations can use while scaling responsibly. Bringing diverse voices, different stakeholders to workshop and brainstorm and test and implement can be a great way to begin… I know WW has teams of service designers and researchers doing this kind of work. Let me know if I can introduce you to some resources. Brightline Eating is saving my life, I’d love to see it grow in terms of diversity. (I kind of don’t belong in its existing culture either)

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  76. Karen

    I am incredulous that a person with a background in a type of social science would be unaware of the impact on a person of color when a white person uses a racial slur, even in the context of rapping. Although I signed up again for Bright Lifers, I really wish I hadn’t now. While I thought SPT’s apology somewhat sincere, I also found it self serving and oddly all about her. (I would have preferred to hear more about how Sylvia was doing.) BLE isn’t a nonprofit company. It’s a for-profit company, so I have had to learn to treat it like one. I don’t owe SPT gratitude because I pay for the services I receive. That was the bargain BLE created. So I’m wondering how and why SPT had a major, indefensible gaff that even my high school aged daughter would not have made. Why, even though she has been thinking of “inviting versus including” for months that she could have done something that was so obviously hurtful. Through a series of negative experiences, I do not trust BLE’s language of love. I have found it to be cliquish instead. This incident further solidified my opinion. I hope SPT proves me wrong.

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    1. Lauren

      Agree

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    2. Jane

      Well said.

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  77. Deborah Garrard

    This is the conversation our entire culture needs! Either/or, this/that, us/them is so divisive! Consciousness brings us to ‘both/and’ thinking!! Thank you to the team for leading a difficult and needful conversation of healing!

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  78. Diane

    Susan , I hold your commit to !

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  79. Sage Lavine

    Susan – it takes a brave, skillful and prolific leader to dive into this topic, to own your own mistakes, and to bring them to the world for all of our learning. You have created a culture at Bright Line eating where rather than beat ourselves up for making mistakes, you make it SAFE to make mistakes – thus allowing us to risk further, to stretch ourselves into the lives we truly want, and to bring our voices fully. I admire you – thank you for being a pioneer of imperfect leadership – the world doesn’t need more leaders who promise rainbow & butterfly solutions – the world needs more leaders who bring their whole hearts, their wounds, their mistakes, and most of all, their commitment to their impact. Thank you for your modeling. The world is a richer more honest place because of you.

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  80. Lizzy

    I would suggest Layla Saad’s ‘Me and White Supremacy Workbook’ which is an intense and eye opening tool for white people to examine structural systems of power and privilege. It has helped me tremendously in seeing my glaring blind spots on the issue and that having good intentions is a start, but until we are honest with ourselves about the benefits we get from inherently racists structures, we can never truly consider ourselves allies. It is ugly work, but work that must be done by us, as white people. It is not the job of POC to train us, we need to do the work independently AND because it is the right thing to do, not because we want praise or to have our guilt removed. I know that this part is beyond your control, but I feel uncomfortable with how many people are heaping praise onto you for doing what is basic and right. I commend you for being honest and apologizing for your actions (I was completely shocked), but I would suggest as you enter this journey that you ground yourself in the fact that this work is to be done for the benefit of POC. This is a NOT a personal, soul searching journey. The audience would benefit not from hearing your personal healing around the issue, but would benefit from having the voices of POC amplified. It will be hard, as I know you have a lot of BLE super fans out there (understandably), but I would suggest your give specific guidance to the BLE community (the white people) to make sure this is not a self-serving endeavor and they will not and should not receive a gold star for wanting, encouraging, or promoting inclusion. Honesty is the best place to start and seeing how we as white peoples benefit from our whiteness in everything that we do. I appreciate you being open minded to suggestions and wish you well on this journey.

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  81. Penney Morse

    So appreciate your honesty. It is a conversation needed not only in bright line eating, but in communities across the country.

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  82. Irina Lee

    … and we love YOU, Susan! ❤️

    Thank you for putting together the best event ever. I know what I’m talking about, because I’ve been to all four of them!!

    This one was the best! Without a doubt.

    Not only did we get more time “to rest and digest”, which I really need after getting so much powerful insight.

    Also, because everyone on your team have stepped up their game. Including you. Just like you so courageously share in this video. I salute you for that.

    BTW: If any Europeans should feel “left out” by not having the opportunity to travel all the way to San Diego, I have some good news:

    Susan and her husband David will join the 2 Year Anniversary of the Norwegian BLE book in Oslo, Norway on August 18, 2019. All friends of Bright Line Eating are welcome!

    For more information, please visit: http://www..spisdegfri.no/party

    Please reach out to me if directly, if you have any questions, at irina@irinalee.no

    With love,
    Irina Lee
    (Norwegian publisher of the BLE book)

    Reply ·
  83. Irina Lee

    Ooops. I did a mistake and typed in the wrong URL for the event in Oslo in my previous comment. Here’s the correct one: http://www.spisdegfri.no/party
    [The first one had two dots in it…]

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  84. Allen

    Hi Susan,
    As a man who has tried BLE with a couple of female colleagues, I have had the funny (odd) feeling that BLE is a female thing. I was amazed that the family reunion pics are almost exclusively of women. Just a feeling?. But having read the book and trying to get hold of the BLE app and learning that you have to be part of the inner circle to use it, I certainly didn’t feel included, in fact I felt excluded. Ii was really like, sure buy the book, but to be really part of BLE you need to join up. I only need to lose about 5 kilos and I pretty much managed that just reading the book and checking in with my two colleagues, but it was really disappointing to not be bale to use the app.
    I live in Australia and timings of online events don’t fit all that well and while I’ve been invited it doesn’t quite feel like being included.

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  85. keri

    Blah, Blah, Blah. If you don’t want people to use a “certain word,” don’t put that word in songs that people of all races and colors will sing along to. Sorry, the offended person should take her grievance up with the people producing and creating the songs.
    That video is babbling bullocks.!

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  86. Diane Ainsworth

    I can’t believe all these so perfect people on here with all these hateful comments. Talk about being judgemental. Susan as owned it and is learning from it. I love hearing from you Susan, you are so open and full of love. Ignore the haters, they will always find something to find judgment on. Many love and blessings to you Susan

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  87. Cynthia Meigs

    Wow. Susan Pierce Thompson, I was blown away by this vlog. Seemed sorta like a confession of ignorance. I too am ignorant about what will offend people in certain cultures and I am striving to learn. In one culture that I am a part of, it is OK for me to call myself a “dyke”or to refer to my “dyke” friends. These are the people most dear to me in my chosen family. We don’t usually resort to name calling however as that is what the word “dyke” implies. And to some it is derogatory. “Queer” was derogatory when I was growing up and now it has been claimed by a group of people as a label of empowerment. This just affirms for me that “times, they are a changin”! as Bob Dylan would say. It is hard to keep up sometimes and I appreciate the confession and coaching on this very delicate topic that I am trying to learn about myself.

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  88. Cynthia

    P-e-o-p-l-e… what is WITH all this sensitivity to insult? Those who condemn Susan are as biased toward her as they are accusing her of being. It’s NOT all about YOU and your precious broken feelings folks! Please get over yourselves and look outward to make the world a better place.

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    1. Marta

      Bravo, Cynthia!

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  89. Michelle Medrano

    Thank you for this honest and vulnerable post. I stand with you in the intention of a more inclusive BLE, in my world and in our big world – while all the while knowing I/we don’t entirely know HOW to accomplish this. In that intention, we will be clumsy, make mistakes, and push a lot of damn buttons.

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  90. Catherine (in Canada)

    “Daring leaders who live into their values are never silent about hard things.” Brene Brown

    Susan – thank you for “owning” your mis-take, for taking the actions required to restore what could be restored as soon as you became aware of the mis-take, and for exposing the gap between where we are and where we want to be so vividly. You seem to understand that no ‘excuse’ will suffice (as in “sorry I missed our meeting but I had a very good excuse…).

    I also celebrate Naomi (above) for offering that you are not responsible for “outcomes are the result of societal structures and ideas that were built hundreds of years ago and are maintained daily by the entire nation in every aspect of life by our collectively being complicit and going along with the status quo.”

    AND – I champion you for the integrity and responsibility with which you own your place as a leader in a global society, and as such, take on the GAP vs the blame between where BLE is and where it wants to be vis-a-vis inclusivity and a place for all.

    It is a mighty gap. And it will take a ginormous commitment and I stand with you. Thank you for requiring us to be part of the gap-reducing force, here at BLE. What we do here can have a global impact…as is your stated intention with having a world of folks who are happy, ___ and free.

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  91. Rea Calkins

    Susan, I suggest that you hire staff members that represent a variety of people that are direct front line staff involved with the people. People need to see someone familiar. Everyone should be included on this journey. Be kind to yourself. You may not have realized that you were not representing everyone, but we all need you in this world. Thank you for all you do❤️🙂

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  92. Diane

    Just wanted to say I love you all deeply and am thankful for all the progress I’ve made in my life with BLE and it’s many opportunities.

    Reply ·
  93. Heather Hudson

    Susan, thank you as always for your transparency and your work. You are such a bright light for everyone that is willing to grow themselves and celebrate growth in others. God bless you always. You are my girl and you will always be in my heart. Love you always. xoxoxoxo Heather from Welland, Ontario Canada

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  94. Judith Myers

    Susan,
    I just listened to your Invited vs Included message.
    I might suggest that you do what I have done.
    I am an 80 year old woman who is white, but definition but when I had my DNA analysis from 23 and me, I had dna from Nigeria, Leone, some neanderthal, and isn’t that a surprise. Thinking that I am white.
    There are not white pureblood anything in the world and our DNA proves that even those White supremists are not white.
    Thank you for your sensitivity to this matter..
    We all need to be color blind. It is the heart that matters and you have a wonderful heart and compassion.
    Thanks.
    Judy

    Reply ·
  95. Roy

    I’m a black male doing BLE. I live in a rural part of Ontario and my career has mostly been in law enforcement. So I’m not white, female, urban or a gangster.

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  96. Brian Donovan

    Susan: this was truly beautiful. The dialogies you mention are necessary for each of us to begin and pursue.

    They are difficult, as you mention, but necessary.

    For a few years, I have been distinguishing between people who invite, when they are actually ordering. For example, ‘do you want to join me to…’ When, what they really mean is, ‘you must come with me to…’ Many people actually do this. I start with invitation.

    The invitation needs to come before the inclusion. But inclusion is an essential part of invitation.

    This is truly an exceptional presentation. Congratulations.

    A great book on this subject is by philosopher Kelly Oliver titled, ‘Witnessing Beyond Recognition’. The book highlights the idea that, before inviting, we must first recognise. You sought to recognise Syliva as important.

    Let’s thrive in our own ignorance and welcome learning.

    Lovely

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  97. Jann

    I love learning and growing with you Susan!

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  98. Scott Hunter

    Susan,
    For your information, i am a male and a dedicated bright lifer. I am at my perfect weight and stay right there. I listen to your weekly vlogs. So you know, i always feel included. But there is a reality here that you must understand. Whatever i do, I am almost always the only man. I belong to a Course in Miracles study group that meets weekly and of the 20 attendees, I am usually the only male. Everything else is just like that. Men don’t seem to be too interested in most growth-oriented things. Maybe they are too busy working or whatever. So i wouldn’t take it personally that you are mostly a female-dominated organization. It will always be that way.

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  99. Carole

    Thank you Susan for your honesty and integrity. Thank you Sylvia for saying something about the way you felt. However, I feel the need to say that no matter how much work you do, there will always be people who will feel un-included. It seems like everyone is offended by something. A name, a book, a movie, a way of life, a religion, a country, a political leaning. I don’t care about anyone’s colour, race, religion, sexual orientation, music choice, nationality, etc. I just want us to be nice to each other. Which to me means that if I say something you don’t like, you tell me and I listen and understand and apologize and we both move on. If I don’t like someone’s music choice, I can leave the room but I don’t get mad at the person because that is their choice. If I don’t like someone’s religion, I don’t go to their church but I don’t get upset with them because that is their choice. I am really tired of everyone trying to be so politically correct.. Thank you for listening.

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  100. Carol

    Thank you for taking on this important work. It feels deep and complex and overwhelming to me. I am a privileged 50 year old white woman . I have learned so so much from you from your weekly vlogs and $29 fourteen day program and your free webinars. The parts work has been amazing, just to have seen that intro webinar. Thank you for beginning to take on this piece of race and privilege. I am so grateful for how hard you work in so many realms. my life is better and richer and healthier and more clear because of all that you have offered. I look forward, really look forward to hearing about what you are learning in that area of race and learning myself. Thank you thank you thank you.

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  101. Joe

    I find it intriguing and elucidating that a weight loss program event has engendered such a multiplicity of opinions and emotions on racism, economic inequality and cultural disparity. Given the political climate in this country and the divisiveness that informs so much of the public discourse, it occurs to me that this is a good thing. Making any headway toward improving the realities of the many inequalities that we suffer under in our society can only be positive for all of us, whether we like it or not. And we should, we must, do it for the same reason we sent men to the moon, not because it is easy, but because it is hard. Susan, your courage more than your intellect is what makes you–in my opinion–a leader. Good luck on your newest journey.

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  102. Steven H Brown

    While I appreciate the pain that the incident that sparked the journey you are on, you are being too hard on yourself. As a man who is on a weight loss journey, but not a bright liner, I am very grateful to you for you for your appearances at many summits, and the weekly vlogs. They give me new ideas an reinforce my plan for a road to living long term in a right sized body. I have no plan to become a Bright Liner, but I still get value from who you are and what you do. You will likely always have a group that is skewed towards women and that is OK! given the differences 8n the challenges men and women face in eating for a healthy lifestyle, not every group can be or needs to be all things for all people. I never feel disrespected because you have focused on the challenges women face in the context of eating disorders, that is your experience and your expertise. . Know that while a Bright Line Eat8ng Family Reunion is not in my short term future, that says more about me, than it does about you and Bright Line Eating and its value, and values.

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  103. SO

    I think you shouldn’t be beating yourself up. It’s none of your business what anyone else thinks of you and I’m pretty sure whatever rap you were rapping was released to be sold,bought, sung, rapped and enjoyed by everyone. I’m pretty sure the artist wouldn’t have been racist and insisted it was only to be bought and sung by a particular demographic?
    I think widening your inclusivity is a marvellous idea, but don’t destroy yourself or mental health in the process. Your current demographic is such because it’s the one taking the bite.

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  104. Leigh

    “Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.”- Maya Angelou
    Thanks for the opportunity you have given all of us to do much better, Sylvia and Susan.

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  105. Felicity

    If the “N” word were used by the CEO of any other organization, that person would most likely be asked to step down or be fired. There is no excuse or justification for its usage. It is offensive. And hurtful. And it shows a troubling lack of understanding and wisdom. Rallying around Susan to proclaim how wonderful she otherwise is trivializes a very mistake that needs to stand alone. On another note, not sure anyone needs to see a 40-year-old company head performing gangsta rap despite how cool/fun Susan seems to think it is to do so. To use language she herself might choose, “WTF?”

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  106. Jessica S

    *Please delete if not allowed. Susan I feel like we (my husband and I) are following the BLE program of getting out of debt, Dave Ramsey. My husband and I often compare our food and financial “Bright lines”. Dave is a radio host and author, but also has several radio personalities he is associated with of different races and sex. I am not sure if you guys would get along because you are so different, but I have heard in the past, you have met with other famous people in the past to pick their brains, maybe you could do that? – It just seem a like all kinds of people call into his show. -He also always says he meds to stop eating NMF stuff, so maybe you could help him too! Just a thought.

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  107. Sheila Spillane

    Susan, I feel so bad for both of you ladies, but at the same time proud of you both for being strong and loving and caring enough to come together. To make a difference in each other’s lives and to make it right. At the beginning of the vlog I was sad but by the end full of hope. Thanks to you and Silvia.

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  108. Ryan Eliason

    I appreciate this video very much, Susan. I appreciate how you’re embracing this humbling experience, and doing your best to learn from it and course correct your behavior going forward. I get that your personal values, and BLE’s values, are to be authentically inclusive of the many diverse types of people who walk this Earth. I assume that inclusivity extends well beyond race, culture and economics, to include diversity of political perspectives, spiritual beliefs, sexual preference, age, and so on.

    My perspective is that BLE is about helping ALL people to discover and maintain healthier ways of eating. And you seem very clear that you’ve got a ways to go to reach the level of inclusivity that is possible and desired. It’s inspiring to see you embracing this challenge wholeheartedly.

    I would love to see more CEOs, and more companies, making this a higher priority. Thank you for taking steps in the right direction. I support you and I’m cheering you on. The world desperately needs us all to learn to get along better, include each other more, and be kinder and more respectful of our differences. Thank you for doing your part by recognizing your mistakes, making amends, and then including all of us in your learning process. We’re all works in progress.

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  109. ReginaDee Sinclair

    Susan,
    I am an American born Chinese Christian woman who falls into lots of categories and cultures and am now in the categoy of widow. I commend your expression of humility and sensitivity. At the end of the day, we all bleed red blood and skinless, we are all the same. I appreciate the Bright Line Eating program and in the span of 1-1/2 months I have lost 12 pounds and commit to losing more because this has become my way of eating and my way of life because at age 73, I feel so much better and know in my gut that this is the right way of taking care of myself.

    I have five mantras that I purpose to live by and remember:

    1. It’s better to be kind than right.
    2. I’m never too old to learn.
    3. The older I become, the bolder I am…with love.
    4. Everyone has a story.
    5. Life is too short…make the most of it.

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