Navigating Surgery with Bright Line Eating

Lots of people in Bright Line Eating Land have been having surgery lately, and this morning, I found myself under the drill, which is its own little story, so this week I thought I would shoot the vlog on how to navigate surgery with BLE. Whether you have a surgery coming up or not, this vlog will provide some helpful tips.

Comments

  1. Stefi

    Feel better & better Susan… always cheery but still… 🤗❤️

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  2. Erin

    Your hair is really growing . It looks nice!

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  3. Jane Sheetz

    Thank you for this subject!!!
    I had to have unexpected gallbladder surgery last Wednesday. I knew on Tuesday afternoon I would have the surgery and spent that evening chopping veggies and getting things ready to just be able to weigh out meals in the following days. I knew it would take a few days of rest to feel better. I didn’t expect to not feeling like eating *anything* for several days. All I wanted was easy-to-digest foods like rice, potatoes, Ezekiel bread, bananas, etc., so my husband ate lots of veggies for the rest of the week! I didn’t break the no flour, no sugar lines in the first few days after. I didn’t eat regular meals because I just couldn’t eat that much at once. But then I was constantly hungry which led me to breaking the no flour, no sugar lines by Saturday.
    Now, 8 days later, I’m still struggling to eat regular lunch and dinner. I’m still recovering and my digestive system still hates me and I don’t*want* to eat because of the discomfort. It’s been a difficult week! My sponsor has been great and my Gideon Games team has been supportive, too.
    I honestly have wanted to just give up for the first time since I started BLE last July. But I won’t!!! I’m so close to goal weight for the first time in my adult life. I’ve been happy, thinner and freer than I’ve been in 26+ years. Giving up is not an option!!! I just have to get through this recovery, regain my Bright Lines/Crystal Vase and learn the lessons being taught.

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    1. Joseph

      Oh Jane. So sorry! I may know what you’re going through because I had my gall bladder removed five years ago. Recovery took time and it was painful, even though it was laparoscopic (three small incisions instead of open surgery). Good news is that the liver knows how to take over the gall bladder’s job of distributing the bile to the small intestines. But it takes time for the liver to learn it. Until then, you may want to consume less fat, because the only thing altered in your digestive system is the mechanism for handling fat. But you should be over the hump on everything else — not perfect yet, but much better than a few days ago. Five years later, and I’m so glad my gall bladder’s gone. It was such a pain for so long.
      Joseph in Missoula

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    2. Bright Line Eating

      Oh, Jane, what a rough week! The struggle is real!! Take a deep breath… You’re still deep in the midst of recovery and doing the very best you can. You’ve got this and we’ve got you. Continue to lean on your sponsor and GG Leader; they care about you. One meal at a time. Sending love, support, and healing thoughts. xoxo

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  4. Laurie Eisenhauer

    Thanks I am 3 weeks out from a major surgery. I kept my Lines Bright and took the time I needed for rest. I had soup available after surgery because I wanted lighter food as I eased back to eating. Love all you do for us.

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  5. Shelley Garr

    Wow, Susan….yoy are a well rested BLE/BLF rock star today!!! THANK YOU for defining what soace looks like when a surgery comes up.

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  6. Shelley Garr

    Space not soace, LOL!

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  7. Z

    Please unsubscribe. Thank you!

    Reply ·
    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi there. If you would like to unsubscribe from our emails, simply click the “Unsubscribe” at the bottom of any of our email messages. The action will remove you from our email list. Take care!

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  8. Jane

    Good tips! Surprised you didn’t address having a saline IV instead of glucose though? Do you not request it? Thanks!

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  9. Riadh Asaad Ghanma

    get well soon
    you look ok
    good info away from food addiction

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  10. KRW

    Thank you for sharing your vulnerability and self care – hitting the pause button – when hard things happen. I appreciate that modeling. In human development, we are learning so much about executive function, as the brain’s “air traffic control” system (Harvard Center for the Developing Child) and self regulation, as mini plan-do-adjust cycles throughout the day. I believe this is what BLE helps us do – and automate – in our daily lives. We stake out a healthy locus of control and build self efficacy. We move through and with life’s experiences, even the hard ones, with greater presence and satisfaction. There is joy in this way of being and becoming for Bright Life Experiences.

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  11. Jaqulyn

    Hi Susan, I wonder if you advocate using microwaves? I am surprised in your blog when you mentioned someone using it to warm up her food and thought that would definitely be a no no. Can you shed light on this according to your thoughts please. Thanks

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  12. Barbara

    Don’t ever ask the surgeon how much he or she slept! Surgery is the one thing they can still do on autopilot being in a glow even though they are VERY tired if they are experienced. If they are tired and you ask, you’re gonna stress them out if they are tired. But praying för the surgeon is wonderful. Pray and trust and it’s the best chance it all goes well. I know the procedure from both sides of the curtain……

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    1. Carol

      Thanks, great tip, Barbara! Certainly don’t want to be patronizing to the surgeon or stressing them out. I’m thinking it’s just really good to create some kind of positive connection with them oh, just that they know that you see them as a human being and are grateful for their care and wisdom.

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  13. Liza

    I always go for the first surgery too! I have two
    Hope joint replacements. It is probably because of the faring why i
    Did that too! Love the ideas of all the pre freezing.

    Hope you got a good sleep last night!

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  14. Carol

    Thank you Susan, I always love hearing from you and learn so much each time. Thank you thank you for your generous heart and wise words, speedy easeful recovery to you! That is a great tip about requesting the first, or an early slot in the day if at all possible.

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  15. Kristin

    Wow Susan, I would have never been able to tell you had dental surgery that very morning!! Thanks for making sure to record this vlog. Love the ninja tip about requesting the first surgery, great advice!!

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  16. Anne Austin

    Thank you! Any ideas for fluids for 24 hours before colonoscopy! Water and broth are all that’s coming to mind.

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Hi, Anne. Medicines with sugar or artificial sweetener in them generally are not triggering, as our brains are able to relegate the sugar consumption to just that occasion. We have never seen anyone triggered by the colonoscopy preparation solution, so you can go ahead and use what your doctor recommends.
      There is, however, a colonoscopy preparation solution that has NO sweetener of any kind. It’s called Golytely (pronounced Go-Lightly) and there are two different kinds: one is artificially sweetened to taste like pineapple and the other is unflavored. You may want to ask your gastroenterologist if you can use it.

      Additionally, at each meal in the 1-2 days prior to the procedure, you can have 8 oz. of broth and 4 oz. of white grape or white cranberry juice diluted with 4 oz. water for your “meal.” Between meals, you can have herbal tea and water.

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    2. Anne Austin

      Thank you!

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  17. Lisa Rothman

    This video arrived at the absolutely perfect time! I was just about to call my friend who is going to prepare my food for the four days after the surgery I’m having on Friday to remove melanoma from my leg and biopsy my lymph nodes. Happily, I do have the first available surgery time 6:30 a.m. so am going to skip the sugary drink they wanted me to drink at 3:45 a.m. to give my cells “fuel.” I could imagine this is warranted to drink if I were having surgery at 2 in the afternoon and hadn’t eaten since the night before but the mind reels at how getting up in the middle of the night to consume sugar before surgery could be helpful in any way. Susan, the stability of Bright Line Eating has been a Godsend during this stressful period – can you imagine all the excuses I could have come up with to eat at the issues I’m facing? I’m also grateful I have not been poisoning my body with sugar and flour all that time – I’m sure this has created an inhospitable environment for cancer cells.

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  18. Leticia Gattas

    My name is Leticia Gattas
    I did sign in for the BLE and I lost or misplace my username and pasword. I have been asking for help to the Tech department with no response. If anyone reading this, will you please advise?

    Leticia Gattas
    leticia.gattas@gmail.com

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  19. Marla Dee

    Thank you – fabulous timing. I am having two long dental surgery days next week.

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  20. Kim

    Wow, Susan! You look great for just having had surgery! Yay, healthy lifestyle, right?

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  21. Denise

    Just had two emergency surgeries last week, on my digestive system. In the ICU part of the time. Five of the days they just had me on an IV and the two days that I was allowed to eat, they had a clear liquid “chef’s choice” diet, all a bunch of nmf full of S. I asked if there were other options and was told I didn’t have a dining choice. It was tough and I’m still recovering. But like another comment above, I still don’t feel like eating because if the side effects from surgery so I’m choosing very bland and easy to digest foods. Hope to be feeling back to “normal” soon although they told me to expect digestive challenges for about 1-2 months. Some surgeries are hard to navigate and stay bright, but I won’t give up. Hope you heal up quickly and get the rest your body requires.

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Take care of yourself, your body, and your digestive system, Denise. Simply do the best you can when it comes to navigating your program. Your health and healing are the current priority! Sending so much love! xoxo

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  22. Laura

    Thanks for this vlog, Susan. Something l learned recently after gum surgery is what a poor choice baby food is for anyone requiring a soft diet for a while. I bought two well known brand names, with ‘Organic’ in big letters on the front. Purchased some main courses (eg: vegetables and turkey) and some fruit. Although both boasted – no added sugar’ both were so incredibly sweet because of things like fig paste, and concentrated apple even in the turkey dinner…..main courses and fruits all tasted the same! It made me appreciate how babies and children’s tastes buds (probably ours!) are subjected to this, and how a normal level of sweetness or a non sweet turkey dinner would taste far too bland. Next time I need to have surgery I’ll prep my own meals in advance.

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Wow, Laura!! That’s fascinating and valuable information. Thank you for taking the time to share!

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  23. Stephanie

    You are wearing a warm-up suit and it is in the high 90’s here.

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  24. Carolyn

    If you have a good chiropractor, get an adjustment. It’s amazing to me how thrown off I get after a dental appointment. 4 hours with your mouth open with lots of stress can really throw off your system. Feel better fast!

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  25. Janelle Trees

    Perfect timing for my upcoming surgery. Thank you dear Susan.

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  26. Sharon

    Hope you feel better! Thanks for helping us prepare for big stuff, like surgery. By the way, I am looking forward to meeting you at the Food Revolution Summit retreat at Breitenbush. That’s in my proverbial back yard so I couldn’t pass it up.

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  27. Susan Lafferty

    Having leukemia and then brain surgery and being at Mayo in Rochester, MN for almost a year now-inpatient and outpatient feels like a whole other thing. Chemo, and immunotherapy, and a subdural hematoma make planning specific meals difficult and impossible many, many times. But….despite it all, it was important to stick to no sugar, no flour because who needs more trouble in their life? , I am a 10 and no thanks, I sure didn’t want to add cravings to everything else that was going on. I suppose what helped me most was clinging to a power greater than myself that I call God, prayer, and my Bright Lines Book. I’m still alive, going home soon I hope (nothing is ever certain with cancer) . I reach out to get support, and love the weekly vlogs. Living in the present has proven to be essential to my well-being. You do the best you can no matter what and you’ll be okay. You will.

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  28. Theresa Carpenter

    Great and timely vlog! I can relate to your story, Susan! Three weeks ago I recently had unexpected dental surgery and was surprised when the surgeon told me to go home and rest and not return to work. What?? I went home, put on my bunny slippers and took the pre-weighed Bright Line lunch that was in my fridge, reheated it in the microwave and put it in the Vita-Mix!!! Just as delicious and no break in my Bright Lines. Thanks for the Ninja tip! Hope you are feeling better.

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  29. Dina

    lots of heart felt 💓 wishes for quick recovery to you Susan and to all you ppl recovering from ops.
    It will be myself too in this category in 2 weeks times, thankfully for a minor op.
    love to all xx

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  30. Susan J Edwards

    Susan, you are so pretty and soooo FUNNY!! Gave me my chuckle for the day. Bless you,

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  31. teri crockford

    Susan,
    I have a friend who not only prays for her surgeon before surgery but brings them a hearty meal to eat before her surgery so they will have stable blood glucose!

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  32. Jen Cook

    It’s said that “timing is everything,” right? Well truer words were never written! I am 5 days into my BLE 14-day Food Challenge, and 2 1/2 days away from major surgery. I’m 57 years old, have been overweight all my life, and have living with multiple sclerosis for over 20 years (secondary progressive MS now). MS fatigue and mobility issues make exercise (heck – even walking) a challenge, but I keep moving the best way I can. I’ve always been so thankful that MS isn’t a disease that’ll take me off the planet like cancer might. Unfortunately last March I learned I had stage 3 triple negative invasive ductal carcinoma. After genetic testing revealed that I carry the ATM gene mutation which raises my cancer risk, I made the decision to have a double mastectomy with reconstruction. Unfortunately I woke up in recovery with one breast and 14 lymph nodes gone (10 of the lymph nodes turned out to be malignant). Today I am THRILLED to say that I am cancer-free – thanks to 17 rounds of chemo and 30 doses of radiation – and 7 pounds lighter thanks to BLE! On Monday morning (6/3) I will have my final surgery; the long-awaited removal/reconstruction of my right breast, and the removal of the expander and placement of a breast implant on the left. So excited to hear your thoughts on preparing for surgery. This weekend I’ll measure, prep, and freeze enough meals for the first week. My amazing friends and family will be bringing us dinners, but are concerned that I “won’t be able to eat them” because of my bright lines. My supportive husband and 19-year old son have been eating the same dinners as me, but I’m sure they’ll appreciate whatever deliciousness folks bring. Everyone will be relieved to know that I have a stockpile of BLE-friendly meals waiting in the freezer. Thank you, Susan for inspiring my friend and coach, Ellie Bassick-Trovato, to establish her Bright Lines, and to hare your amazing program with others! I can see (even after only 5 days) that BLE will be a life-changer – no wait… make that a life-saver for me!

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    1. Bright Line Eating

      Cancer free!!!!!!!! All the best to you in your surgery and recovery, Jen!! Sending love your way! <3

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