Recipes in Bright Line Eating

Our tribe has expressed overwhelming interest in a Bright Line Eating cookbook and official BLE recipes for a while now. I address the topic in this week’s vlog, so you definitely don’t want to miss this one!

 

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Comments

  1. Nancy

    Wow! One of your best EVER! It So resonated with me! Just what I need! Thank you, Susan!!!!!

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    1. Shelley

      Agreed. Just the blog was freeing

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  2. Melissa Kerby

    Amen, Sista. As usual, we can trust there is good reason for the way the program is setup/structured. Each day, I learn to trust more and more in the process. Have I told you lately that I love you? I – and we all – do.

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  3. Cathy

    Wonderful reminder. No feathers ruffled here.

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  4. Joseph Meyer

    Hi Susan, y
    you say that BLE not only aims at changing the eating habits but intends to change the whole person … Fare enough, but I then understand that only one out of 100 really makes it.
    Best regards and thank you,
    Joseph Meyer

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    1. Julie

      My bet is that BLE will change those statistics and I can’t wait until Susan can share them. I’ve lost 30 lbs and kept it off for over a year and never see myself going back.

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  5. HELENE LAGACE

    I like the expression “Ruffled feathers”. it could not be truer. Still, I beleive that excellent food can be made respecting BLE guidelines. Eating is a real pleasure in life.

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  6. Joseph Meyer

    Hi Susan, you you say that BLE not only aims at changing the eating habits but intends to change the whole person … Fair enough, but I then understand that only one out of 100 really makes it.
    Best regards and thank you,
    Joseph Meyer

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    1. Laura caplan

      Joseph that statistic is exactly the sad truth regarding most diets. Which is why BLE takes a completely different approach. And trust me the statistics are way different here. If you read anything about BLE you see that many people have lost their weight and kept it off. For exactly the reasons susan talks about. BLE is a shift in our way of thinking and our relationship with food, not just a diet. And by the way, I enjoy cooking for me and for my family. My food is always tasty and I do enjoy it. But it’s no longer the focus of my pleasure in life.

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  7. Jill McKissack

    I must have tried weight watchers at least 10 times. The thing I hated the most about it was that it kept me focused on food. Morning, noon and night counting points made me insane, because my main focus all day long was food. So I get what you’re saying 100%, Thank you.

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  8. Judy A

    This makes so much sense. Thank you.

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  9. Sarah

    Thank you! I saw those cookbooks and decided I want to continue to keep my food simple. So, this video was greatly reassuring. Thank you!
    I’m not sure if this goes along with keeping things simple, but I find myself transitioning from eating meat towards more plant-based protein. I think this is happening because of BLE but I don’t know why. Any science that would explain this?

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    1. Paula

      Hi Sarah! It may be the pure simplicity of preparing veggies vs preparing/cooking meat, reducing time in a “hot kitchen” so to speak!

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      1. Jarka

        Hi Sarah! I would say, your body instinctively knows where is the real nutrition as it gets healthier & healthier.
        Meat is full of fat (even the leanest ones), not even mentioning all the disgusting stuff in it if it’s not organic. The fat in it is really hard for our body to digest. Esp. the liver’s functions slow down, the natural detox is way slower than it should be, and our blood get thicker & less oxygenated, which contributes to many diseases.

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  10. Ronna Berezin

    Your stated philosophy in this blog is probably the only way one can safely lose weight annnnd keep it off. Even ionly 1 out of 100 does it acc to Mr. Meyer it is still true! And where does he get his stats onyour program or any others?

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    1. Rachel Young

      Ronna, Re: the 1 out of 100 statement Meyer’s made:

      The figures come from Susan Peirce Thompson’s book, “Bright Line Eating: The Science of Living Happy, Thin & Free.” In the forward by John Robbins, he states Susan is “among the less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the population that has gone from being obese to slender and kept that weight off for more than ten years.” (The numbers are later broken down and show it’s 1 out of 100. Thompson later explains the dismal failure rate. Keep reading.)

      In the chapter, “The Obesity Epidemic: Not A Problem, A Mystery in Plain Sight,” Thompson states:

      “But here’s the statistic that I want to focus on: among the obese who try to lose weight, the failure rate is 99 percent. Literally. Ninety-nine percent do not succeed at getting slim. (See Fildes, A., Charlton, J., Rudisill, C., Littlejohns, P., Prevost, A., & Gulliford, M. 2015. Probability of an obese person attaining normal body weight: Cohort study using electronic health records. American Journal of Public Health, 105[9], e54- e59)

      “And for that precious 1 percent who do succeed, the triumph is temporary. The vast majority regain the weight over the next few years. The average dieter spends a whole lot of money and makes four or five new attempts each year, with almost no hope of success.”

      So, is there a solution? Thompson outlines her four Bright Lines in chapter six and gives the answer, which takes commitment, dedication, and discipline (some comments here describe that process as obsessive): “There is only one long-term, sustainable solution to this mess that I have ever seen work. […] Give up sugar and flour. Completely. Get them out of your system quickly and definitively.”

      Thompson’s book explains just how addictive sugar and flour are and their impact in the brain. There is no way to lose weight, keep it off, and stay “Happy, Thin & Free” unless you completely eliminate all sugar and all flour.

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  11. Dina Grossman

    I totally agree that recipes and cookbooks can be counterproductive. Especially for those who have been obsessed with them!

    I am very good at preparing simple, tasty recipe-free food. But during my so-far 7 months doing BLE, I have also seen a lot of people struggling because they don’t have the very most basic skills, like peeling and cutting vegetables – or steaming – or sauteeing without oil – or roasting vegs – or using a pressure cooker (so important to reduce lectins in beans …. which the Robbins among others point out)!

    It would be great to have a little BLE handbook about these basic skills. So I hope the idea you presented towards the end will be implemented … and that an actual cookbook is no longer provided in the boot camp! (Katie Mae’s cookbook is not easy for a new BLE’er to use, especially if he or she is not vegan. And … to go back to the main point: Boot camp is not the place for a cookbook, but some information on simple food preparation would be extremely useful.)

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    1. Robin Opuszenski

      Diane, I agree with you to an extent. I agree with Susan to keep it simple. I just want some simple salad dressing recipes! However, I recently discovered Katie’s Bright Kitchen(.com), a fellow BLE participant, (not affiliated with Katie Mae). What I love about her website is all her recipes are broken down into portions using the BLE guidelines. She has a cookbook too but it’s a little pricey, I guess because it’s self published. My plan is to try one new recipe per week and not stress out about it, still keeping it simple. PS: I’m not affiliated with Katie’s Bright Kitchen.) I think someone mentioned it on FB.

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      1. Beth Holmes

        Thanks for this info — I thought they were the same!

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    2. Monica

      Thank you for mentioning Katie’s Bright Kitchen. The website it wonderful!

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    3. Dina Grossman

      I agree that Katie Gates’s Bright Kitchen is great … and I have invested in ger book. But even then…. that is not what beginners need. They need basic food prep skills.

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  12. Helga

    Susan you are a brilliant orator. This blog speaks simply and eloquently as to the entire process and direction and focus of Bright Line Eating. Anyone thinking about about this program or trying to understand what it is should listen to this vlog.
    Well said and thank you.

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  13. Dana S Rodgers

    Love, love, love, love, love! I say that every week, but this one was exactly what I needed to hear. I’m not a big recipe book girl, or even into cooking. But your explanation (re-explanation for me) about foot neutrality is just so key, so important to understand at a deeper level. Been a BLE eater for only 200 days, but the past few months have begun to feel “harder” and less “free”. I can see that I had moved too far away from simple. A week ago, I went back to pure, plain basics and today your vlog helped me understand why I once again have so much peace in my world around food. Thank you Susan. Thank you again and again for bringing your experience, knowledge, and tenacity to a world full of people who desperate need it. XOXOX

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  14. Susan in California

    I noticed improvements myself when I began to de-emphasize the role of food and food prep in my life. Foods taste wonderful with as little as possible done to them if your palate is not exhausted from salt, hot sauce, tobacco, alcohol, etc. Though I am not a Bright Line tribe member, I eat fairly much as you prescribe (with some dietary limitations due to reactivity) and I use cooking as a creative outlet when I do it for others. But you are absolutely correct that it frees up your focus for other pursuits and relegates food to what it should be: fuel for life.

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  15. Ann

    I get this or got this and have found this gradual transformation that you so lovingly talk about in the blog. I find myself choosing restaurants by the simplicity of their menu. I tell my friends that this is a lifestyle change. The longer I’m on the program the more I know that this will be forever. Peace and Love to you.

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  16. Jessica

    Feathers not ruffled, but I think you’re missing something here….for those of us who used to make elaborate recipes, we don’t really know what it looks like to “just keep it simple” and “just steam some veggies” and “add a condiment here or there.” In my mind, a BLE cookbook would be essentially a roadmap to preparing food in that manner. Like, here is how long to steam green beans and here are some condiments that go well with them. And maybe some information about vegetables that we’ve never prepared – here is bok choy, here is when it’s in season, here are some ways to cook it. If we’ve never kept our food simple in the past, we’re not going to magically know how to do it just by staying away from elaborate cookbooks! And so we fall back on recipes and techniques that we know. What a help it would be to buy bok choy in the grocery store and know that I can look up exactly what to do with it, without having to sift through the non-BLE suggestions of the internet.

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    1. Dina Grossman

      Jessica, your ideas flesh out what I have been thinking: A BLE “cookbook” should help people master the basics. I was thinking mostly about people who can’t figure out how to peel and chop, or steam … and you have brilliantly described those are accomplished cooks and need help to learn to apply the skills in a simpler way!

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    2. Beth Holmes

      Absolutely Jessica. I was able to cobble this information together from posts in my Boot camp house, BLE Instagramers, and entries in the BLE website Support FAQ, but that was/is somewhat tedious. I am not an intuitive cook so I need instructions — lots of them — be that recipe’s or just instructions on how to steam or roast veggies. I understand keeping it simple, but for me (10 on the scale) if I get too bored with my food that’s when I’m tempted to break my lines. So after 5 months of BLE eating I have got a pretty good balance of simple weekday meals and then on the weekend I try some new things, or recipes that take longer to prepare. I could really use guidance also on how to make simple BLE compliant clean sauces and salad dressings, on how to calculate portions for things like soups, stews and chili which I am not willing to give up to do this program, but I loss some of my food freedom struggling to do the math around the portions. That said, I do understand what Susan is getting at. I grew up in a home where my Dad was (and is) obsessed with food and recipes and cooking. Whole vacations were planned around restaurant guides and where we were going to eat. Even now when visiting him our days are planned around what and when we are going to eat — but I managed to keep mostly clean Bright Lines when visiting him over New Year’s.

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  17. Kim Bishop

    I agree to disagree. About recipes. I feel obsessed about weighing my food and writing it down each night and makkng sure when I shops I have all the right ingredients and eat them in correct order etc. and freaking out if i am out at restaurant and not knowing ingredients or portion size etc. The program is great but very obsessive. So i get where uou are coming from with food neutrality. I am a foodie I love trying new recipes and such as eating healthy is boring and food does give me joy , hence yes being 30 lbs overweight…. So I get that. But if you are trying to feed a family. Or if food truly brings you not and it is healthy and filling and you will actually eat different stuff and change your pallet I think simple recipes are good. Even if it is just using different spices or trying different veggies in something or a way of making them like noodles for zucchini etc. Just my thought s…

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    1. Suzanne

      I totally agree that the program is obsessive.

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      1. Heather

        Look I wouldn’t say its obsessive unless I thought looking after a new baby was obsessive. There are a lot of details that cant be overlooked, that you have to be attentive to to ensure life in those first critical weeks/months. And so it is with BLE. you do have to be attentive and take care of the details but once you have it down and its automatic you flow and isn’t that true of absolutely any new skill.

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  18. Maggie Lillo

    Thanks so much Susan! This is why BLE works where every other weight loss plan else has failed so miserably in my life and many others as well. May I mention here that your recent email recommending Dr. Jade Teta was very disconcerting. I signed up, since it was coming from you… and was immediately overwhelmed by hard sell, endless emails to my inbox, trying to sell me supplements on a daily basis and a complex program of exercise and, yes, recipe books, that seemed to fly in the face of everything I have learned from BLE in the past 6 months. It triggered a lot of anxiety in me and I actually ended up having my first major food slip-up since I started. PLEASE Susan, I beg of you, don’t recommend anyone else to us any more. BLE is the only program that works and all we need. Love you so much and so grateful for 75 pounds lost. (60 more to go!) xox

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    1. Terez

      +1 on being thrown off by the programs Susan keeps emailing us about, that mess with our peace around our BLE program. Wish I could unsubscribe from all those types of emails Susan sends without losing her genuine BLE emails as well.

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      1. Kijito

        Yes and Absolutely! I’ve been on BLE for two years and USED to be involved in their research program (sending in monthly totals), but they could not differentiate between sending me those email reminders and not sending all the unnecessary fluff (like endless reminders about coaching calls, etc.). You would think with the awesome IT staff they have that they would figure that out, but not so far. How hard is it to categorize?? Really?! So now I get NO emails (from BLE) to my regular email address and all the general ones go to a secondary address which does not see me as a BLE participant. They keep preaching we need to “stay close to the mother ship”, but then make that hard to do.

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    2. Barb Moff

      I agree completely and was frankly upset about the endorsement of the mans system.

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    3. Melissa

      I absolutely agree – I felt used and abused by this man’s presentation. He talked and talked and wrote and wrote and said NOTHING of value. That strategy is offensive and upsetting. So, I emailed them to say so, and they sent me an email saying they would respond. They did not respond but did send an email asking if their support was helpful. Sheesh!

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    4. Jennifer Allen

      I also signed up for Jade Tetas program because I am on a bright line plateau. I DO think Dr. Tetas rest-based program meshes well with Susan’s “bunny slippers” approach to weight loss, when it is time to add fitness into your health regimen. But, the health-sherpa site he sells his program through is an annoying sales-pitchy free-trial- supplements distraction.

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  19. Eileen Lass, your proofreader from Virginia

    Thanks, Susan! I totally get it and agree! I have so much JOY in my simple and delicious meals! I am baby-stepping to food neutrality and automaticity.

    If you do decide to put out a “Bright Line Eating HANDBOOK” to teach folks how to prepare foods simply (thank you, Dina Grossman!), I’d love to serve by proofreading/editing it.

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    1. Dina Grossman

      Thanks Eileen!

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  20. Rhonda

    I also I agree and disagree. What you said is right on. Keeping things simple is usually a healthy way to live. But most things however, there are two sides to the issue.. , Having BLE recipes available can also take some of the focus and worry about what to eat. Having to think less about what we eat and more about how we live our livesis the goal, so having healthy recipes available can make this easier . I know for myself if I have a few things prepared ahead of time that are healthy (andBLE) for me to eat, that when I’m really hungry or stressed I can just reach for something (that I know is good) instead of thinking about what meal to put together. Also having to take others into consideration when cooking for a family can be very stressful. Having a resource to go to, for me, would free up a lot of attention paid on what to cook. I could simply pick something out of the book and make it without much thought . In short, I think it’s more the frame of mind you have and how you use a cookbook that matters .

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    1. Rosmarie Starck

      I so agree it’s you!,,,

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    2. Kijito

      Yes! Cookbooks are only tools. It is how you use the tool that matters. A shovel can dig a hole, and it can also fill in a hole, but it’s the same shovel. At the same time, either of those jobs are hard to do without a shovel (unless you’re a dog!).

      Still, having said all that (as well as previous comment), I was convicted that I do obsess over food at times. Recently began the vegan switch over, and was amazed at how limited my food choices became (when I also eliminate soy and a few other allergens). Agree with several other comments along the lines of how nice it would be to have a cookbook that outlines simple ways to fix new and different vegetables and grains that are not normally on one’s diet radar. Without soy I’m only allowed five different choices for protein, and three of them are beans. I like beans, but … really??

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  21. JoAnna

    That was exactly what I needed to hear… I have been the classic “still obsessed over food but don’t eat sugar and flour girl”. Thank you so much for your inspiration, and your intelligence. Praise God for people like you.

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  22. Bevan Davis

    I find myself feeling like I have a foot in both camps. I think I eat simply:
    Last night I ate a pile of raw watercress, topped with steamed sprouting broccoli, some roasted tomatoes and the correct amount of beans. And my fat was a tablespoon of salad dressing.
    I thought it was divine and I enjoyed every mouthful.
    But here’s where my two contradictions arise:
    1. Because for me, that was the sexiest food ever. I feel every cell in my body vibrate with utter joy when I eat this way, and it feels incredibly sexy. But given this vlog, that sounds like something best avoided.

    and 2. because I have a sporty, growing boy to homeschool Full Time, and a long distance runner as a husband, and I live in a remote rural location. I am super busy and I can only shop once per week, I don’t have a freezer. I HAVE to spend time planning all our meals every week to make sure everyone gets their nutritional needs met, and to ensure I can feed us all all week. So I do plan. Plus I create recipe cards for each combination of veggies/proteins and fats I create that works for all of us – which is writing receipts as far as I can see! But when time is really tight, and I’m tired and feeling uninspired, I know I can just grab a week’s worth of those recipe cards, use them to write the shopping list, and we’ll all stick to our healthy nutrition all week, rather than resorting to something we regret.

    So in terms of avoiding a BLE cookbook…………bother, I seem to have created one in my little kitchen already! xxxx

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    1. Terez

      Please consider self-publishing it on the amazon platform, Bevan.

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    2. Beth Holmes

      Right — we are all doing this individually, cobbling together instructions on best ways to roast veggies, steam veggies, veggies to try, BLE compliant simple sauces and dressings, how to count chili as protein + some veggies — why isn’t there some sort of handbook (food prep book) that we could all use. Maybe we could crowd source one somewhere on the web. Having instructions and some simple ideas available all in one place isn’t the same as obsessing over 100s of recipes in cookbooks. It would keep me from spending as much time as I now have to searching for ideas on Pinterest and Instagram. I eat pretty simply, but I know if I don’t also mix it up a bit I get bored and that’s when I’m tempted to break my Lines.

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  23. Amie

    That was beautiful Susan. I know that what you shared is true.

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  24. Kristin

    Something else that really resonated with me, is food neutrality. I have always struggled with eating healthy and feeling passionate about eating food I really enjoy. I find it hard to still eat food I really love in the long term yet still have neutrality with it. I feel like we should really enjoy what we are eating, but how can you do that if you feel neutral about it? I guess its a fine balance? And something I tell myself that I have to surrender to? Yet I still do enjoy what I eat on BLE.

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  25. Margie

    Doing the program on my own after reading your book. I had initial success but stalled out trying to find recipes that would fit with the program. Your blog explains why I should not be doing this in a way that made perfect sense to me. I still cook for others, but will keep mine simple. Just the basics. That’s what I did in the beginning and what I need to continue to do. Thank you so much! (I will keep the recipes I have found for when I reach goal. Perhaps then I can refer back to them for something special now and then. Yet keep it simple for 90% of the time. We will see!)

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  26. Jean B

    Hello and thanks for the reminder that it is about changing your view on food. However, for busy people, it would be great to have some basic, simple recipes as others have stated above: saute green beans and put some garlic on it; bake chicken with Trader Joes’s Seasoning Salute. Perhaps we can share in our FB groups.
    thanks again.

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  27. Kathy

    One of the things that brought me the most peace was throwing out all my cook books and many recipes taking up space in my kitchen! Been doing Bright Line eating for over a year, I only need recipes on line sometimes to know how to prepare certain vegetables or meats when I am trying something new in the line up of regular foods or preparing for guests. Everyone raves about how good they feel after a meal and it certainly takes up so much lest time like Susan says. I am a big fan of simple food! Love you BLE and Susan!

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  28. Cilla

    Brilliant!
    LOVE the simplicity!

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  29. AMT

    Thanks for this important reminder

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  30. Mary

    I also signed up for…recommended by Susan and was overwhelmed by stuff in my inbox.
    BLE is the only program I want to listen to and follow…because it is simple for me.
    Regarding the cookbook, I would like a simple primer…like in school to transition
    between kindergarten and first grade. I buy lots of fruits and vegetables.
    I cannot eat them all. I do not want to throw them away.
    How can I mix them and freeze them for later use?
    I have 6 bananas and I am going to mash them, add some oatmeal, nuts and
    bake them for morning with my coffee. simple and useful.
    I love you too, Susan, for “saving” my life. I pray for you and your family.

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  31. Mary Antico

    This was perfect timing for me, because I realize that in the past I was using food (eating out, mostly, but also at home) as entertainment, as a pick-me-up, basically as a way to add some fun to my life. Just today I fell back into that trap a bit by trying to figure out how to create a curry-like sauce for vegetables (with raw cashews). In fact, the keeping-it-simple method is much, much better for me as I find other ways to add fun to my life. A few people above are saying they need a book to figure out how to steam veggies, and at the risk of ruffling some feathers I have to say that seems like people with extra money to spend, who feel like they need to purchase a book for everything. I bet you could make money by producing such a book though, but it would have the downside of making BLE seem like just another diet. If you do it, maybe you could put the proceeds toward making the bootcamp slightly less expensive (a way for people with a bit of extra money to help those of us with a shortfall, just a thought!). I just finished the 14 day challenge and would LOVE to do the bootcamp, but I just can’t afford it now. I am confident though with the book and the vlog I can continue eating this way, at least for awhile.

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  32. Mary

    Another thought…this BLE primer could also include slogans
    Keep the food simple. Shop, chop and chew.
    Prepare ahead.
    I keep my food black and white so I can live my life
    in living color.

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  33. Gail C

    Thank you for sharing this. Having heard about your book and work on a summit I was listening to was the beginning of freedom for me in all areas of my life. I am so greatful. This was a major key in opening up the prison door which I had been behind.

    Thank you

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  34. Buffie in Colorado

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart for taking this stand against food preoccupation … and calling out “food porn” … please don’t back down off this. Better to learn excellent cooking techniques for the simplest meal rather than wallow in recipes.

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  35. Betty

    Thank you Susan for the reminders. Great vlog today.

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  36. Marlene Sarnat

    Thanks for that explanation. and reminder.

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  37. Beverly DiCarlo

    Eloquent AND wise.

    Today your body language carried a beautiful light qualty, btw.

    Not do you ever cease to amaze me

    The message is the voice of healing.

    Humbly, may I say, I am ready to assist you with this very same message when and if you might consider extending support here. It would be my true pleasure to consult one on one as a former LCB culinary instructor and now Brightlifer. This message is so clear, positive, on point, and much needed . It has been ingrained in my heart. BLE is the best compliment to what I have known to be true ever since when. And still learning.

    thank you dear Susan

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  38. Kathryn Steele

    Simple is best. But to be simple and cook for a family of 6, you still have to plan. Having simple recipes to use for dishes makes my job easier as a mom. Recipes are a must. It could be an easy one pan meal or a crock pot dish, but I still have to plan ahead for shopping and so I don’t have to think about it during the week.

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  39. Deb

    I’m curious to explore beyond the “all or nothing” approach to this topic. Most breakfasts and lunches for me are the same every day. Easy and simple. And 3-4 days/wk. I love to cook a BLE dinner that adds some variety and tastes fabulous. Now I’m only a 6, and single with plenty of time to cook and been with BLE for 18 mo. I actually found that after 6 mo. of BLE I broke my lines most often at dinner when I just couldn’t face another “simple” dinner. Quite frankly finding Katie’s Bright Kitchen recipes has been SO helpful in supporting me to keep my bright lines AND move toward a plant based diet. Couldn’t it be possible that some of us can achieve food neutrality and keep a “foodie” approach sometimes?

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    1. Cindy

      Deb, I really appreciate your comment. I use recipes for that reason as well, when my food gets boring and for making it simple for me instead of trying to create meal plans on my own.
      I am not in the tribe, but have Susan’s book and follow her vlogs.I admire her greatly and she has inspired me to clean up my eating habits and choices. I was a little surprised about the fact that her program is not supposed to be focused on food. One of the reasons why I have not started BLE is because I don’t want to take a scale out to weigh my food. when I am at a restaurant. To me, that is obsessive. On the other hand, I appreciate the reason for weighing your food and assume that after you get the hang of it you might not have to do this?
      Anyway, I think a recipe book would be great!

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      1. Beth Holmes

        I will never take a scale to a restaurant to weight my food. Period. As long as I don’t eat out frequently I just use the one plate method. Eating out is something that we don’t do often and is usually part of a celebration and a way to be together as a family or friends. I truly believe that I can eat simply most of the time, not be obsessed with food and recipes, but still enjoy a festive night out once in a while. If I can’t do this — then I will feel deprived or bored — and that’s what leads to breaking my bright lines. Oh, and I’m a 10 on the scale.

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      2. Beth Holmes

        Now if I had to travel for work and eat out frequently I might consider weighing food in a restaurant, but luckily I don’t. I did take my scale when visiting family over Christmas and New Years — and used it when we ate at home.

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    2. Beth Holmes

      Exactly — I have to strike a balance between simple and interesting as well and for that same reason.

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  40. Jacqueline

    Another great vlog.
    However I’m one of those people who have a different perspective. I’m new to eating a lot of WFPB foods and I enjoy things like soup as I can put it in a flask and have it on the run. So for me, a simple receipe book would actually make me think about food LESS as I’d build up a reportoire of basic breakfasts and lunches that would mean I wouldn’t need to think about it all so much. That would give me more freedom around food. xx

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  41. Rosmarie Starck

    I have been on Maintenance since Late November 2017. I go through different phases: first I was cross that there were no recipes and I have to reinvent the wheel every time I cook. Then a reluctant sense of freedom that I can actually create my own recipes. Then I have done this and it worked, I usually write it down in my BLE recipe cookbook. Then I feel again that I spend more time thinking about food and recreating the wheel again. Keeping food simple is very good and yet for me a vegetable soup is simple food and it would be appreciated to have some simple recipes., especially when it comes to cooking several portionsThere must be more to BL E food than I open a tin of beans, steam some kale and cook some potatoes and weigh all the cooked items before I eat it. And of course the salad.
    A bit of variety doesn’t necessarily feed food addictive behaviour but I do agree we have to tread carefully!

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  42. Edwards Robin

    When I saw the title, I thought, OH NO! WE DON’T NEED a cookbook! I was 100% in agreement with the vlog. I don’t need my food to be so complicated. BLE works for me. Keeping it simple works for me!

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  43. Kathy

    My comments often tend to ruffle some feathers but this time I´m all AMEN! I don´t actually do Bright Line Eating but I suffered for many years from eating disorders. Back then I collected recipes and was obsessed with food and cooking. Now that I´ve healed I find I hate cooking, can´t be bothered with recipes and everything is so much better when I just keep it simple!

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  44. Andrea Tollison

    Breaking free from the cookbook mentality was exactly the theme of a post I wrote when I talked about how I combine my BLE with Wildtree products. There are 53 individual Wildtree products that are 100% BLE compatible based upon my review and the majority could be used without the need for a recipe. If you include products that may have NMF after the first 3 ingredients, there are a total of 73.
    I see a huge opportunity for collaboration between the Bright Line Community. and me, a Wildtree rep who follows BLE. I will make my list of sugar and flour free Wildtree products available to anyone who asks for it and can further refine it to other dietary needs such as gluten-free, vegan, etc as well. Here is the post I mentioned above. http://thiswellseasonedlife.com/2018/02/10/no-cookbooks-please/

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  45. Jeanne Fontaine

    Great VLOG, Susan. I especially appreciated your explanation for the reason why BLE shys away from cookbooks and recipes in general. You have given me something to contemplate. Thank you!

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  46. Caroline

    Understandable….after all many are diet obsessed just for weight loss .
    There needs to be the transformation to health of body ,mind and spirit….it does take time and practice to develope.
    That being said….there’s always going to be the obsessed and those who will not change their lifestyle AND
    yes I would love a cookbook!!! LOL
    Because I am not the best at variety and experimentation or culinary prowess ( although I wish)
    I know I’d be blessed,satisfied and relieved I didn’t have to think when I’m done at that time of day and planning for other family
    gatherings and visitors who come and stay a few days…..healthy ,reliable,…Susan, from acorn to oak tree,just saying!🇨🇦❤️

    Reply ·
  47. Theresa

    I love keeping it simple…in all aspects of my life… Shop, Chop & Chew… the best take away for me!

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  48. Dawn

    Perfect! Very powerful and just what I needed to hear! Thank you!

    Reply ·
  49. Lauren Vollare

    I’ve got to say that I was getting tired of eating the same ‘ol, same ‘ol day in and day out, but for the reasons you mention here, I didn’t want to get into making complicated recipes – too much focus on food. What I’m learning is that it doesn’t take much to shake things up a bit – a different spice, roasting instead of steaming, a new vegetable I’ve never tried before. It makes a huge difference in taste with very little extra effort. Thanks for a great video. You sure have a knack for communicating ideas concisely and clearly. Bravo!

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  50. Peg Marinelli

    Hi Susan,

    As a 10+ on BLE food scale & a recovering foodaholic , I must keep it simple & I buy in totally to your Sweet Surrender theory. Anything less does not work for me. Keeping my meals one bowl simple – salad-veggies-protein-fat all in one bowl is the way to go successfully for me. I am 60+ & have a similar beginning to you. After a lifetime of eating disorders, bingeing & dieting, I FINALLY found success with BLE. K.I.S.S. is the only way to go for me – hence no recipes needed or wanted or I will become obsessive about food again. I am so very thankful for you & the whole BLE clan. I have lost 50 lbs since last March through BLE & am maintaining it. I am HAPPY, THIN & FREE. I wear a size 2 & am 106 lbs- never ever thought that would happen to me! I workout 7 days a week & am doing a 4 hour spinatholon this Saturday! Thank you from the bottom of my heart!

    Love, Peg

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  51. Jane Moore

    When I first started back in October 2017, 5 months ago, I frenetically searched for recipes in order to prepare my food. That lasted about 3 months roughly until around the end of boot Camp. Since then I have relaxed and settled into eating steamed vegetables, raw vegetables and a little seasoning usually salt, protein and fat. It was around that time that I thought I was getting “lazy” and couldn’t be bothered preparing my food with any flair but looking back it really wasn’t that at all.
    I had come to be at peace with my food and it just wasn’t important to me anymore.
    It has made my life so much easier not stressing about what I was going to cook!
    It wasn’t until now and this Vlog that I realize I have made a giant breakthrough with food. It is now not controlling me and food is less important to me now. Where I was struggling to come up with a plan of what to eat now just happens automatically and I am at peace with meal planning. Simple is quick and easy!!!
    Thank you so much Susan Pierce Thompson!

    Reply ·
    1. Carolyn

      Amen, I’m in 100% agreement, Jane. I love the simplicity of what I eat and the simplicity of how I prepare it. There are some very satisfying condiments to add extra flavor, if I want it. Before BLE, I never knew how wonderful food tasted in its original state, without marinating it in butter, oils and sauces. I, too, have found that peace and don’t believe I would be in this place today, without the STRUCTURE of the BLE program.

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  52. Karyn P

    Maybe people are meaning meal ideas. I am struggling with that on Day 3. Sample meal plans for beginners would be SUPER helper!

    Reply ·
    1. Karyn P

      And I love the idea of how to cook things to taste the best – steaming, salmon, etc

      Reply ·
    2. Beth Holmes

      Exactly. Ideas for simple meals — that’s what a cookbook can be — it doesn’t have to be all elaborate, complicated recipes.

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  53. Shanda

    I got rid of nearly all my baking pans soon after finding BLE, plus all my cookbooks except one. I LOVE my simple meals and never get tired of the food! Tomorrow marks 20 months of BLE, and after losing 63 pounds I’ve been within goal range for almost a year.

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  54. Sue

    Oh Susan, THANK YOU. This couldn’t be more timely! My initial reaction was “oh no, not a cookbook and more marketing.” Plus I’ve recently succumbed to eating more elaborately prepared, multi-ingredient foods from Whole Foods hot bar, and am suffering accordingly. Keeping it simple, and the focus on life not food truly is the way to go. Eat to live, don’t live to eat. My weight and health are so improved when I keep it simple, and don’t focus on/anticipate/daydream about what my next meal should be. Thanks for helping me get back on track just when I need it most.

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  55. JM

    This is a big reason I have a rotating meal plan every week. Thursday = stir fry, Monday = rice bowls, etc. I don’t have to stress or obsess about it too much.

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  56. Barb Moff

    Have come to the place where I really don’t care if I eat or not cause it all tastes the same . I sat at lunch today with yogurt, hummus,steamed vegetables and an orange. Tried to find flavor or taste. Other than the orange, nothing had much taste. I think there has to be more. I am a 6 and have been on BLE for 11 months. Lost 54 pounds, with 18 more to go. 79 years old.

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  57. Kathy Martin

    While I see your point and would probably be more successful if I kept my food simple, I don’t want to. Cooking is my creative outlet and I enjoy the presentation of a delicious BLE meal. Today, in fact, I am going through my stacks of recipes I have collected from cooking classes (which I don’t go to anymore) and other on line feeds looking for BLE compliant recipes (trashing the rest). It’s what I do for fun.

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    1. Beth Holmes

      Personally I don’t see a problem with this! I don’t do this much but I do it. I need some variety and I’m not an intuitive cook so I also need step by step instructions on how to prepare foods especially if they are new to me. The comment above where the poster says all of there food tastes the same just makes me sad!

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  58. Dyna

    I was really disappointed to hear Susan’s description of why we don’t want to focus on recipes. It’s like we want to diminish food, eat to survive, without putting care and attention into a socially engaging custom. The recipes would allow for some creativity, additional taste experience and ability to share our BLE foods with others. I’m right there with most of the BLE movement, but this feels off to me.

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    1. Anna

      Agree completely!

      Reply ·
    2. Beth Holmes

      Absolutely! Where is the healthy balance here. There is a place between obsession and bland rote eating. BLE is working for me because I can follow the plan and still interact socially with those who are not.

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  59. D

    I agree with keeping it simple-it works for me. Doesn’t seem to fit with all the food pics on twitter. They’re literally a little too much “food for thought.”
    Love BLE and thank you so much for getting the information out there!

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  60. Jean Morell

    What’s wrong with. Recipes. I like to cook and bake. But I follow a different diet plan it’s for healthy. Eating. I like to do recipes bake cakes with coconut flour I don’t like. Flour I use Flaxseed make pancakes 🥞 I enjoy watching foods being made. I don’t eat sugar flour oatmeal

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  61. Elaine Cousineau

    Thank you, thank you, thank you, Susan. I heard you say this early in my walk with BLE, but somehow after joining Katie Mae’s cooking class, I fully understand your logic.

    I am a 10 on the susceptibility scale and I simply can’t say no to the temptation to use some of the substances that I simply cannot use. I was just going to say maybe some day I will, but as I write that, I know that I never can. The recipes are such a trigger for me.
    If you ever do write a cookbook, please, please, please don’t include any recipes that offer NMF because there will be some people who could probably eat it and get away with it but I can’t.
    Thank you for explaining it once again. I’m still struggling to get back on track and I am frustrated with myself that I have not been able to get down to my previous lower weight.

    Reply ·
    1. Jeralynn

      Holding good thoughts for you! One day at a time Elaine. I am a 10 as well and this was a good message for me too.

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  62. Kathy Frodahl

    I thoroughly enjoyed this vlog?? Simple eating is key to good health!! I have been following a “whole foods “ plant based diet and don’t need a complex cookbook for that!! Not to mention my labs are excellent!!
    LET FOOD BE THY MEDICINE!!

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  63. Carolyn

    This vlog reminded me that If I step too far outside of BLE, by straying from ‘keeping it simple’, then my temptations and FOOD ADDICTION will always stay close to the surface where my sabbatour quietly waits. The saving Grace in the BLE program is its STRUCTURE … and we addicts need structure to stay clean. How committed are you to your bright lines? Susan has said that BLE is not for folks who need it … it is for folks who are willing to do what it takes to work the program. SISU

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  64. Megan

    I have to say that when I started BLE – it stressed me out to not have a food plan to follow – and that I had to come up with my own combinations of a protein, veggie, fat. And it kind of depressed me thinking I was just stuck with eating a protein, veggie, fat – with out any fun herbs or little healthy addition to it that made it somewhat fun. I know the point of BLE is to make food black and white so we can live our lives in color.
    I ended up not doing BLE – and switched over to a food plan that Betty Rocker sells. Susan – just for fun – go to her website and purchase one of her meal plans. They are not perfect BLE but they are super healthy. And you’ll be able to see a system that she has created that is very effective. She pretty much gives you a shopping list and a menu for the week. Each week has a different menu. You spend about 2 hours prepping your food that you use through the week. Recipes are repeated through the week – so every meal you’re not making new recipes from scratch. Her food is all very simple – yet delicious. For example – she has a white fish recipe that uses olive oil, lemon juice, minced garlic and grated lemon peel. OMG – sooo delicious broiled.
    So I think you could continue to do things the way you are doing them. And there are plenty of people who would be willing to do it this way. And – for those of us interested in livening it up a little – offering a meal plan similar to what Betty Rocker sells would be AWESOME. I would buy it. Your providing it would mean I would have fewer decisions to make through my day. And I am exposed to different recipes, herbs, healthy ways to prep foods, etc…
    Thank you for everything!!! What you all are doing is fantastic.

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  65. CJ

    Yes that’s great but for those who don’t really cook and mostly ate out or microwaveable meals, having something simple to follow helps. I like the receipts that members post on Facebook, I use most and now are learning there’s more then microwaveable meals.

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  66. Riadh

    say hi to philip werdell if you come across him
    that was nice

    Reply ·
  67. David

    This video did not resonate with me. For me (and maybe because I am only a “6” on the S Scale) I WANT variety. I only had 15 lbs. to lose to hit my ideal weight (same weight I was in college). It took me 70 days to reach this goal.
    I REALLY appreciate the BLE recipes I have found online. They offer me a level of variety that keeps form from getting bored with the standard fair. Every recipe we have tried is BLE compliant & for the most part delicious (-:

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  68. Karen

    After watching this I was feeling a bit like I might be obsessing over food – even more so now that I’m shopping/chopping/chewing and nothing comes out of a box. But I’m having fun learning about food. I haven’t cooked very much for most of my life, and when I did, I had to follow a recipe. In the past, I was not very good at throwing things together. However, I am gaining that skill. I’m learning to improvise more, my meals are usually tasty and satisfying, Some are simple, some are not. I’m learning about spices, what goes with what, how to store my veggies properly, my grocery budget is looking excellent, I’m saving money and I feel great. But every week when I sit down to plan out the menu and shopping – I peruse Pintrest for ideas or ask the family what was something I made that they liked and would want again. Ask a lady name Dina said above, it would be great to have a simple guide book to teach us basics of cooking and food.

    PS – I did buy one of the fake BLE cookbooks, 1st recipe had maple syrup in it. I sent it back 🙂

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  69. Judy McQuinn

    Susan, Thank you for this message. I was almost sucked into that BLE cookbook, but when I looked at a sample page and saw the ingredients, I knew it was fake. I also made a note in the review section that Amazon provides. Your comment about a how-to rings true with me. Suggested condiments, and methods would really be helpful. I am the cook and shopper in the family. Menus are my big bugaboo. Once I get a week of menus done, things fall into place. So a grid of a month’s menus would really help too. It’s easy to get off track when you have to refer to a cookbook to find out how to cook a certain something. You have to weed through the stuff you don’t want to read to get to what you are looking for.

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  70. Dennis Conklin

    I disagree but for a different reason – sometimes I need food to be quicker than a salad and a steamed vegetable. With all the fixins, a salad isn’t necessarily that quick. If I could get a recipe for a bean and vegetable stew and then know that 2 cups of that would meet my dinner requirements on a night I was pushed for time, that would be fabulous. We did not cook every night before I joined BLE and I find myself spending more time on food now than before. For a long time I have prepared my oatmeal on Sunday for the week. I would like to do similar for dinner. I can weigh out my salad for all week, but the bags get cumbersome, a lot of stuff needs to be cut just before you use it so it doesn’t dry out, etc. Maybe I’ll figure out my own bean and veggie stew recipe.

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  71. Emily in MT

    Simple works best for me.

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  72. SamD

    Soup guidance would be nice. I have figured out a couple of simple vegetarian chili recipes that I measure out at 6 ounces of beans and some extra for the veggies, but beyond that I’m not sure how to measure other soups. The simplicity in soup is being able to prepare it once on Sunday, and have it last for the week. The chili is also excellent served over spaghetti squash, which I also roast on Sunday to have for the week. The time investment on Sunday makes meals during the week very “automatic.” And it’s stuff my family is willing to eat, which makes life much simpler in general.

    Reply ·
    1. J

      I am vegetarian and on weight loss, so I make a soup with a ton of veggies. When it’s done, I strain out all the vegetables and weigh my 10oz (I do 10oz at both lunch and dinner; if you do 8 and 12, maybe do a few of each), then add roughly 8oz of broth to each before freezing them. Now, my ingredients are solely vegetables, broth, and water. If you’re adding meat, I personally would cook that separately and then divide that into each container. I love the soup, and make enough for about 12 meals at a time. Then, in a pinch, I grab jarred pesto for my fat and some protein to toss in (chickpeas or beans are light, but 2oz mozzarella is a tasty and filling option if you eat dairy).

      Reply ·
  73. Susan

    Thank you soooooo much! This was so encouraging to hear. The simplest is always best in my book!! As always, thank you Susan for your wisdom. Another Susan😃

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  74. Lori Stewart

    I love simple!! It makes life so much easier and much more enjoyable!! I want to say I’m on day 170. Went to the dr for my yearly check up. My dr was amazed by my numbers. She printed it out so I could put it on my fridge. It was awesome!! Last year at this time I was close to needing meds for high cholesterol. Not anymore thanks to you!! You are amazing!!!!!! Thank you so much!!!

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  75. Marilyn Hunt

    Hi Susan, I signed up for the 14 day challenge but I’ve been scared to start. I’m 74 and I’ve done every kind of diet but I still struggle. I’m very active and try to eat what I call healthy but when I looked at the amount of food we get with nothing in between it scares me and I’m afraid I can’t do it. I guess I need some encouragement. I love listening to all your blogs. I’ve been, I’m sure, you would call it addicted to Diet Coke and crystal light.

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  76. joanna

    I have been doing BLE since October of 2015, the reason I do break my lines occasionally is because of boredom – recipes would be nice.

    Reply ·
  77. Linda

    Thank you Susan for being so real. 3rd day on 14 day challenge.
    Feeling great cant believe the energy I have Wow.

    Reply ·
  78. Barbara

    Oh boy! I am still wrapped up in the food. I keep my meals simple at home. However, I so appreciate (too much) a delicious meal at a restaurant. And let’s talk about watching the baking shows on the Food Network when I am at the gym…food porn, indeed. Keep it simple….strive for food neutrality.

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  79. Anna

    Simple sounds nice in an ideal world, but what if you’re feeding a big family? I do not want to serve my husband and six kids BLE meals each night (with distinct protein, veggie, etc.). I ENJOY creating a variety of meals for my family – and trying it the boring way burned me out on BLE really fast. I’m back on now, but I DO create recipes that my whole family will eat. These may include soups, casseroles, skillet dishes, sheet pan dinners, etc. Each Saturday I peruse Pinterest, find healthy recipes to prepare, and then purchase groceries and do the week’s meal prep on Sundays.

    On the days I serve something healthy to them that’s not BLE, I eat something that I’ve prepared in advance.

    BLE needs to be practical for all walks of life. Idealism doesn’t help.

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  80. Terrie

    Thank you for this vblog. I literally had just looked at the “Bright Line Eating” Cookbooks on Amazon–even added them to my cart. Glad to know they are fake. I love soups–especially in the cold, winter months. Obviously, the cream based soups with flour to thicken them and sugar to sweeten are not going to work, but is there any way to incorporate vegetable based soups into the plan?

    Reply ·
    1. J

      Absolutely. I have them at least once a week. Just strain out the veggies at the end, divide that into your veggie amount (I do 10oz at both lunch and dinner) and add roughly 8oz of broth back to it. If I have a hair over for the broth, I don’t fret, because that doesn’t throw me but if it makes things wiggly for you, stick strictly to 8oz broth per serving. I love the Pyrex glass storage containers. They freeze, thaw, and microwave beautifully, and most of my soups have a lot of tomato in them and acidic foods can cause toxins to leech from the plastic containers (plus they shouldn’t go in the microwave).

      Reply ·
  81. LAs Mom

    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple S….. Yep, this is the best advice ever!!!
    Maybe a healthful eating handbook (a how to steam, saute, etc.), rather than a book of recipes.
    Money spent on ‘another’ cookbook could better be spent on ‘good food’ that we combine with helpful tips to create our own recipes….lord knows we already have enough recipe books getting dusty.

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  82. Tina

    Hi Susan,
    I appreciate the keeping it simple format. I would like to see a cookbook in the future though. I had browsed through the ones on Amazon you mentioned, when I saw they were not official I did not get them. As a person who has gone from primarily pre-prepared store bought heat it up at home meals, to someone who is trying to keep it simple, whole foods, plant based, any help I can get in basic how to cook/prepare fresh simple foods is much appreciated. Knowing what to do with veggies that are not common is daunting. I have been learning what I can here and there, but when I started your 14 day trial, some sort of guidance on simple veggies and how to on basic prep would had been very helpful. I made it to about day 4 when I couldn’t tolerate the amount of veggies (mostly raw d/t my inability to prepare). I love your book, your theories, info, guidance and encouragement and all the different questions you address weekly! Seeing all the different aspects from others is really helpful and insightful!

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  83. Sue Hesse

    I have been keeping it simple since I started with BLE, June 16, 2017 and have lost 79.6 pounds! It’s just like you said, Susan, by keeping it simple I don’t worry about food or even think about it until it’s time for my meal! I am so grateful to you and look forward to meeting you at the family reunion this summer! 💖💜

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  84. Jutta Sinclair

    It seems to me that you are distancing yourself from all of the plagiarising cook books that are not endorsed by you. I feel that just pages the way for a new book . Part of the 2 boot camps that I have participated in has been Katie Maie’s ‘ s vegetarian cookbook , one of her recipes that my husband eats for lunch whenever I have it prepared for him so thank you for that ! I just feel that this is a marketing ploy to assure a authentic Bright Line Cookbook . It hits me the same as the program that deals with the emotions behind weight gain eating that we can solve for an extra $1000.00 in Bright line healing . I really value the initial boot camp that I paid $1000.00 for that helped me to lose 60 lbs at 69 year of age but the discount for others meant that they pd 250.00 & I really resent that because I really did not have the excess funds. Now I find that marketing is taking over for you . You run the ship so ultimately you are responsible.

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  85. Belinda

    Susan announced that she was working on a cookbook with her publisher Hay House during the webinar promoting Brlght Line Healing about a month ago.

    Reply ·
  86. Missy

    Believing this is easier to do during maintenance. Working to totally keep my interest and good habits post boot camp!

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  87. Lisa Wilson

    Another great vlog, Susan!!! Thank you so much!

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  88. Pia

    Thank you Susan. i keep telling pp that besides the audio , and/or the book , and/or the 14 days ch and/or boot camp
    Bright line eating doesn’t sell anything no pills ,pouders etc .. And the free weekly blog’s are soo supportive.. I deeply respect you and your team.
    And i wish that your dream to bring this movement to the pp who are not abel to afford it ,

    Reply ·
  89. Pia

    …come true ..

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  90. Julie Ann

    Another great vlog! It’s like you are watching me at home! I always say I am happy and thin, but not free. This opened my eyes as to why. I mean, I learned how to work the plan in the boot camp, but that is the part of it I didn’t stick with. Thanks for the reminder!

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  91. Mona

    Thanks Susan ! Once again you remind us , eating is what we need to do every day, but not to be fixated on it. Three meals ,no snacking and weight your food. I find I get aggrevated with people recipes and showing food on facebook. Enough with the food conversation. We need to move on and enjoy going outside, visiting friends and get on with live. Thanks again great vlog .Have great week everyone!

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  92. Maggie Eastman

    So appreciated this Susan. I was doing Trim Healthy Mama and was obsessed with recipes. My focus was on the food. As a 10 on your scale, I needed to move from the lure of satisfaction by food … Simple, sane and free. Love it.

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  93. Mona

    Mona From Northern Ontario Canada day # 194 today 50 lbs down almost on maintenance . Thank you for all your help and support.

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  94. Mary E

    Watched this on the same day I watched the Webinar encouraging participation in the Boot Camp. The first free incentive was Katie Mae’s Bright Line Eating cookbook. ($25 value)

    Also, I’ve seen a response from a BLE staff member to commenter with a cookbook request: “We’re working on it!”

    Back in the day when My Daily Companion was “coming soon,” we were told “that’s where the recipes will be.”

    It seems like a collection of simple recipes would be helpful to many.

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  95. Sara

    You’re absolutely right! It’s a wonderful feeling of freedom and relaxation when the new habits are established….like reaching a ledge in a hazardous climb. Simplicity has been a great assist.

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  96. Jennifer

    What you’re saying makes sense. But does that mean that you eat your bright line meal and then cook entirely different food for your family? Or do you all eat simple Bright line food? I do not enjoy cooking. I would not want to make one meal for my family and a different meal for me. I meal plan for the week every Sunday. I grocery shop to those specific recipes. And my week goes well.

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  97. Gigi

    On your last vlog regarding recipes or how to prepare food . It would be helpful to keep it to the point and not so wordy. You spoke to much and didn’t really hone in on some great ideas about certain recipes or how you prepare your meals. I find that your vlogs are boring you don’t get to the point right away. You stress you don’t want people to be obsessed with food well by not giving specific ways either in you book or the vlogs is not very conducive in helping meet this challenge. Please present information right to the point and demonstrate or show examples of recipes that have worked for you or others.

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  98. Barbara

    I need recipes to help me stay on BLE. I am not a natural cook who can just throw stuff in a pan with a few spices. I am 2 years on maintenance and extremely happy with the BLE lifestyle and results I have gotten. I cook with my husband on Sunday afternoons. I use recipes to make large amounts of food that we can eat all week. It works really well for us. I have found a group of standard recipes we use that are BLE friendly and every couple of weeks I throw a new recipe into the mix for variety. I don’t spend a great deal of time looking for new recipes or pouring over cookbooks. I quickly find one and move on to living my life fully. If we like the new recipe, I add it to the group of standard recipes we use. Life is good on BLE. I highly recommend it for feeling happy, thin, and free.

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  99. Susan Mills

    Thanks Susan. I understand BLE is supposed to be simple and that is how I have structured my eating, and this includes the meal plans for each day. Preparing protein, vegetables, and fruits basically helps me to eat properly and then forget about food. Thanks for the confirmation.

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  100. Tina

    Thank you Susan< I love the simplicity of BLE and find simple food very tasty . Before BLE I did a 6 week online boot camp for whole plant based food diet. Fun as it was and very delicious it was also exhausting and I could not maintain for the whole 6 weeks as the recipes were very involved. Luckily I found BLE and was relieved to see the focus was not on cooking fancy recipes. If I get bored I do add variety but even that is simple. Thank you again.

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  101. Mary Antico

    You will probably never see this comment because there are so many, but it strikes me that what would make more sense is a BLE food journal. Basically a notebook that we could use to write our daily food plan but that would also include in the margins (or on the left-side page) tips about steaming veggies, good vegan protein ideas, mantras, etc. I mean, the nice journal books people buy are not that cheap, so if people are going to make that purchase, it makes sense to buy something that will make people feel more connected to BLE. If you do that though, please consider making it spiral bound, so that we can prop it up with only one page showing.

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  102. Kelli

    Yes!! Yes!! Love this!

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  103. Violet

    Thanks so much for this vlog! No recipes was one of the major things that attracted me to BLE. Other diets to me were just more complicated with recipes and shopping lists and I never followed through on them. With BLE you can pretty much start immediately with what’s in your cupboards and fridge. All I had to do was go buy a good food scale and I was ready to go!
    Thanks again Suasan.

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  104. Maureen

    There is nothing automatic about cooking for me – I really dislike cooking day in day out and get truly bored after a couple of weeks of the same “simple” food. It then takes no thought to revert back to the fast simple NMF dishes I was used to before. Some simple ideas as mentioned above by a number of people would be truly helpful even if not in an actual “recipe” style format.

    Reply ·
    1. Susan

      Hi Maureen- have you tried prepping and cooking on the weekend to avoid cooking each day? This has made my life much simpler and I always know there is a good meal waiting in the fridge.

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  105. Margret

    What’s wrong with “pretty darn simple” recipes. I don’t like to cook, work long hours and would like a bit more variety of simple recipes for automaticity. I’ve been eating the same lunch for six months and got sick of it and got off track as having an automatic alternative or two would have been helpful..

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  106. Laura A Slagle

    This makes so much sense – one of your best vlogs ever! Now I want to know how to explain to others that BLE is not a diet…I get so frustrated with people asking how I lost weight and although I try to explain, all they hear is the food plan and they say, “Oh, I could never do that!” Well, I couldn’t either…that’s just the point! How can I explain in a way they will understand that it is more of a mindfulness-based lifestyle plan?

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  107. Nancy

    Would you please consider adding a link to a written script of your videos? The videos are great, but when I am busy it is quicker for me to read the script.
    Thanks

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  108. Laurie Rolan

    Excellent advice. I’ve lost weight so many times (even in OA), but food was always still front & center in my life. At one point when I was well on the path to anorexia I was eating 400 calories a day and reading cookbooks constantly! It makes so much sense to “take food off the throne” so I can be free of the obsession. Thank you for sharing this!

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  109. Jenna C Reed Livingston

    “Cookbooks = food obsession” isn’t a link I’ve ever made…until today. Extremely powerful kick in the brain today. And, also…quite liberating as well.

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  110. Nancy

    So what about a book of simple recipes. Keep in mind that some food addicts have never learned to cook–all can do is pick up fast NMFs. Therefore a cookbook of simple recipes might provide a viable and valuable tool.

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  111. Claire C.

    I have a question that I hope someone can help me with…I could not find any answer in the book: I like to make a veggie chili with black, pinto, kidney beans, mushrooms, onions, celery, corn, diced tomatoes, red peppers, chili and cumin. I also make a soup with kale, cannellini beans, tomatoes, onion, mushrooms, with vegetable broth. Are these allowed in BLE, and if so, how much (in ounces) would be allowed for lunch or dinner?

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  112. Holly

    Wow – that makes total sense to me and now that I’ve heard it said aloud, it seems so obvious and sensible. Thank you!

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  113. Vicki

    Thanks for pointing out that recipes and cookbooks contributes to the food addiction. I have a ton of Keto, Paleo, Low Carb cookbooks that it is mind boggling. I like that this WOE is basically 4 squares/3 times a day, for the most part. I have always thought “why can’t I eat 3 square meals a day? Well, here it is.

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  114. Victoria Klitzka

    I’m a little confused. A bonus in boot camp was BLE cookbook by Katie Mae?

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  115. Anna

    I was just getting ready to buy one of the bogus recipe books and watched this first. I am so glad I stopped to watch. I will not be buying a cookbook.

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  116. Lisa Abercrombie

    This was very informative. I have wondered the why of no cook book. I understand now. I think my search for recipes is that all I knew prior to BLE is casseroles; meat cooked with lots of different sauces and noodles! I don’t know how to really cook “just chicken” well without it tasting like dried out nothingness. I’ll learn. Thank you for your explanation, and it makes total sense.

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